5

You can carry the same subject through multiple actions in the same sentence without repeating "she" (or her name) over and over again; the subject in each additional clause should be clear to the reader. Something like: Jane opened her eyes and reached out toward her screeching alarm, fumbling as always to silence it before it woke the neighbor's ...


3

I know this is an old question, however there have been more recent replies so I figure it's not terrible of me to add one more on. I'm not a published author yet, as I'm still working on my novel. But I'd like to contribute my opinion as an avid reader. I'm sick of seeing the hate for prologues. I love them, so long as they are gripping and add to the story ...


3

Your best to confirm with the particular person as there isn't full standardization. From the submissions guidelines of the publisher Edge Science Fiction and Fantasy, they consider it separate. What to Submit Required Extras (see below) Query/Cover Letter (see below) Synopsis (see below) Title Page (see below) Prologue (optional) (see below) Chapters One, ...


2

As the author of the story, with absolute freedom to tell your story anyway you want, you can use any POV you want in any scene you want. So yes, you can use an Omniscient POV for the prologue and 3rd person limited in the scenes of your chapters. I am told that 3rd Person limited is the most common POV used for writing these days because it is the easiest ...


2

The short answer is: use 'epilogue' (var. 'epigraph') regardless of where you place something that is not quite part of the text of the body of the work. It's an 'off-label' use, but then if one is a writer they have license to do just that - especially where no other good devices or terms are provided. Language is inherently flexible in that respect and for ...


2

Write the first draft. Then go back and revise according to whether it sounds right, and all the pronouns have a clear referent. After you revise to make sure you have a coherent plot and clear characterization and a distinctive setting. This is because you could revise this passage twenty times to get the pronouns right, and then realize the whole thing has ...


1

The best way is to clarify this question with an agent you work with. According to the majority of editorial guidelines, a prologue is not considered a chapter, so you should send chapters 1-3. Unfortunately, there is not a general standardization. Publishers usually provide their own submissions guidelines.


1

R. A. Freeman invented the "Inverted" detective story, in which the reader is first shown the crime in detail, and then sees how the detective solves it. In most cases the first section is told from the criminal's PoV, and the 2nd from the detective's or an associate of the detectives (the Dr Watson role). But in some cases, the first section was ...


1

You have correctly identified your issue: Your prologue has cannibalized your main story. A prologue should generally be brief, otherwise, your reader may grow invested in it to the point that they reject the switch to the main narrative. I've read books by very good authors where the extended prologue was great, but I barely even made it through the rest of ...


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