62

'Publish' is a word with specific meaning and from the context of your question I can tell you're not looking to publish. You're looking to have your work printed. That can be done quite easily, if you have $39 to spare and live in the US. (I'm not affiliated with BookBaby and have never had them print a book. I can't say anything about the quality of their ...


29

Yes, this is relatively easy to do these days through Print On Demand services. One that I've personally used in the past is Lulu.com. Their user interface is easy, and their POD books are of comparable quality to what you would see from a traditional publisher. The price per book is also comparable to what you would pay retail for a standard book. They do ...


21

Just to offer an old-school solution, you could always print and bind it yourself! Yeah, there's lots of services which can print on demand these days, but when I printed a book for a friend, they were not around. Whether you want to go through the effort to print and bind it yourself is really a matter of how you feel about the physical object you end up ...


4

Most traditional publishers now use POD for their backlists. It's a controversial practice, because some authors and publishers disagree about whether a POD title should be considered "in print" for purposes of determining whether rights revert to the author or not.


4

They have told me to use INDESIGN, GIMP OR INKSCAPE as design software, then convert to PDF. Whoever told you that, they either hate you or are on a wrong set of meds. GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is for manipulating images, not book-length text. INKSCAPE is a tool for creating and editing vector graphics, again, not book-length text. Adobe ...


4

iBooks Author creates e-books in EPUB for the Apple Store. But AFAIK (I haven't used it) you can export your iBooks Author e-book as a PDF. POD (Print On Demand) companies like IngramSpark will take a PDF and convert it to print for you. However, most authors will use apps like Vellum, InDesign or PressBooks to create their e-book and then upload the ...


3

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: https://www.createspace.com/Products/Book/?sitesearch_query=calculate%20cost&...


3

First of all, you appear to have established the ways in which yours differs from the others. Then, also look at other POD providers - I take it you're also concerned with the matter of print costs, but that's difficult to avoid with a massive tome. POD / CreateSpace may not be the right answer, however appealing it may sound. You could also talk to ...


3

I've seen this up for quite a while now and will take a stab at answering your question. However, the answer is much more complicated than the question. The simple answer is yes, Python is used to convert text to braille tags, and a LaTex package is used to print out the symbols. IF the brailler you are using is not designed for use with a proprietary ...


3

I've used Lulu Press in the past. You can order one book at a time if you want from them. And if you are willing to go ebook, then look at Amazon and Barnes & Noble too. Wikipedia's article on self-publishing is a good general place to start searching.


3

When I was publishing my first book, I found that the best pricing I could find to self-publish a hard-cover book was from Lulu. I wasn't doing a picture book, but if they were good on other types of books, they're probably good on other types of books, too. So here's their pricing page for picture books: http://picture.com/pricing You might also look at ...


3

Yes, some of them use POD for their back-catalogue. Bloomsbury Publishing has launched a digital global publisher, called Bloomsbury Reader, that will sell a back-catalogue of titles in e-book and print-on-demand format. Bloomsbury Reader will sell books that have either never been printed before or haven't been available in print for many years. The range ...


3

Make sure you have permission first before you do anything. I tried that with a fic of mine and they flat out said "No" and that I was not entitled to self-publish or make any money as long as it was based on their universe.


3

I don't think you should plan on a specific number. If you plan on a small run, tell them it's small (less than a thousand). Maybe ask them why they want to know how large you're going for so that you can answer better. I think your answer should actually be that you don't know and that you plan to do "print on demand" which has the capability to grow, but ...


3

I've done this a lot to print out drafts. I have 2 methods but prefer the 2nd: In word, Layout > Page Setup (small icon bottom right of ribbon box) > Margins > Pages section > Book fold. Then when I print I'll use landscape and select "print on both sides". In word, save as pdf, then print > booklet (print on both sides selected). I have an epson printer ...


3

Any full-service book printer can create custom sizes if they wish, it just takes more work and costs you more. Printing machinery generally only works with paper of particular sizes. This is why you see stock sizing. And why one printer might do a certain set of sizes and another will do a different set; they have different machines! If you want ...


3

I think I understand where you're coming from for this question. However, I don't think we can answer it. Paper is often measured (where I live) in grams. However, that only really reflects the thickness. It doesn't tell me about the colour or the quality. Bright white can be thin or thick. Next to me is sitting a novel that is thirteen years old. It is ...


3

The "weight" and grade of "finish" will affect the look and feel of the printed page. Your preference amongst the options is not something we can advise you on. Check at a local printing shop, or paper specialty store, to get a hands-on assessment. But if you are concerned with longevity (15 years, as you asked), don't worry. Most papers used in ...


2

Yes, small-press publishers use print-on-demand. It's hard to do a print run of less than 500 books more economically than print-on-demand, and many new books sell less than that. In fact, by the time you factor in printing, shipping from printer to distributor, cost of warehousing, and shipping to retailer, it's sometimes really hard to do better than ...


2

I'd recommend going to PODW and walking through their instant quote wizard. It will give you an excellent appreciation of the sorts of decisions that you have to make, and an idea of the costs. If you went for some traditional book printer you'd probably get a better price, but the effort of dealing with them would make you wish for an early and painless ...


2

With your first book, you have no idea (honestly...) how it will sell. So, your 500 copies may well take a long time to sell, and in the meantime, you have to keep them in a damp proof storage location, preferably not on metal shelving (winter cold creates damp that way), and other factors apply, too. Nowadays, it's much easier and cheaper to use POD (Print ...


2

Typically when you self-publish, you retain all rights to your manuscript. The printer is just performing a service for you, there is no contract, so you should be able to take everything with you, no questions asked. The only exception would be if --as you seem to indicate --you used an Xlibris template for your cover art, in which case, that would stay ...


2

If it is something as simple as a novel you can actually use a word processing program. (I know of people who produce relatively complex magazines using Word. My wife has written several books using Word.) Open Office and Libra Office are both free and will produce pdfs if you want someone else to print it. You need to check the layout on the pdf that is ...


2

You need a desktop layout program, such as Adobe InDesign or Quark XPress. Don't use Word; it's a word processing program and not meant for layout. You could possibly use LaTex, but I don't know much about it.


2

Yes, there are print-on-demand publishers who will do this no problem. Here in the U.S., I know of CreateSpace and Lulu. If you live somewhere else, try doing a google/bing/whatever search for "print on demand publishers". Check out their terms. You want someone who doesn't charge any non-trivial one-time fee to get started. (Like in the U.S., Lightning ...


2

You don't need a publishing house for that (and anyway your intended distribution is too low for such companies to be interested). You just want to self-publish your work. When I self-published a book (making, ultimately, about 300 copies), I went to a commercial duplication place that could do production and binding. I was producing a manual, so 8.5x11 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible