68

'Publish' is a word with specific meaning and from the context of your question I can tell you're not looking to publish. You're looking to have your work printed. That can be done quite easily, if you have $39 to spare and live in the US. (I'm not affiliated with BookBaby and have never had them print a book. I can't say anything about the quality of their ...


32

Yes, this is relatively easy to do these days through Print On Demand services. One that I've personally used in the past is Lulu.com. Their user interface is easy, and their POD books are of comparable quality to what you would see from a traditional publisher. The price per book is also comparable to what you would pay retail for a standard book. They do ...


23

Just to offer an old-school solution, you could always print and bind it yourself! Yeah, there's lots of services which can print on demand these days, but when I printed a book for a friend, they were not around. Whether you want to go through the effort to print and bind it yourself is really a matter of how you feel about the physical object you end up ...


8

Having worked in the Print industry for over 20 years, in different shops that print traditionally (offset) and digitially (POD), it usually comes down to quantity if you are asking for an apples to apples cost per book. If you want one book printed, it's much cheaper to send finalized artwork to a printing company and they could process your file for a ...


5

Book layout is a very specialized field. If I were writing a book of my own, I'd save up the extra money for a layout person, particularly if the book had a lot of tables or illustrations, or if it used a lot of non-standard characters. Rates for layout are currently anywhere from $45 to $85/hr, so the cost of laying out a book depends on the length and ...


4

Like you, I came to LaTeX from a background in HTML, web development, etc. I was able to learn it, but as with any markup language, there was a learning curve. LaTeX, being older, has developed many idiosyncrasies over time, but more importantly it has grown to become incredibly powerful. You'll have very granular control over typrography using LaTex. I have ...


4

Most traditional publishers now use POD for their backlists. It's a controversial practice, because some authors and publishers disagree about whether a POD title should be considered "in print" for purposes of determining whether rights revert to the author or not.


4

I published my book at CreateSpace, too. If an order gets in, they print the book, ship it to the buyer and collect the money. Simple work.


3

Any full-service book printer can create custom sizes if they wish, it just takes more work and costs you more. Printing machinery generally only works with paper of particular sizes. This is why you see stock sizing. And why one printer might do a certain set of sizes and another will do a different set; they have different machines! If you want ...


3

You'd have to give more information for a true apples-to-apples comparison. As @chowzen says, a key factor is how many copies you are printing. To offset print a book requires a certain amount of "setup" work to create the master plates. I've never paid someone to offset print a book, but I've had one-page flyers and the like printed, and the printer has ...


3

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: https://www.createspace.com/Products/Book/?sitesearch_query=calculate%20cost&...


3

Yes, some of them use POD for their back-catalogue. Bloomsbury Publishing has launched a digital global publisher, called Bloomsbury Reader, that will sell a back-catalogue of titles in e-book and print-on-demand format. Bloomsbury Reader will sell books that have either never been printed before or haven't been available in print for many years. The range ...


2

Yes, small-press publishers use print-on-demand. It's hard to do a print run of less than 500 books more economically than print-on-demand, and many new books sell less than that. In fact, by the time you factor in printing, shipping from printer to distributor, cost of warehousing, and shipping to retailer, it's sometimes really hard to do better than ...


2

That is how print-on-demand works. It would be best to order a proof, before you publish, which is around 10 dollars U.S, but after you publish with CreateSpace, they will print your book, and ship to whoever buys.


2

I believe the alternative of Lulu for you is Mybestseller. They can print 1200+ pages and have no limit as far as I know. But you should contact them for the specifications of your special order. Nothing is impossible!


2

As far as I'm aware those requirements are when you are placing a book for POD sale to the general public --meaning it goes into an online store. If you are just doing POD for your own personal use, I can't imagine most services would do any censoring --I'd be surprised if they vet the content at all. It's been a while since I did POD, but my recollection is ...


2

They exist. Though it depends where you are. A3 appears to be art book sized. The A3 size print measures 29.7 x 42.0cm, 11.69 x 16.53 inches, if mounted 40.6 x 50.8cm, 15.98 x 20 inches. (ref) Why does it talk about mounting? Because it's a designation for art prints, not books. A3 is a paper size that is typically used for drawings, diagrams ...


1

Last I checked CreateSpace only supported soft cover, so it's something of a moot point there. In any case, you will have to create two PDFs for at least one reason: You must have a different ISBN for a hard cover edition than for a soft cover edition, and you normally include the ISBN on the copyright page of the book.


1

With the advent of digital publishing, printing on demand has become very common and as a matter fact it has become the norm. Primarily it helps to economize the book publishing business model as it reduces the number of books to be printed because conventional printing press will require at least 500 or 1000 prints otherwise it becomes uneconomical ...


1

Here's what I've learned over the past three years. It doesn't have to do with the size or length of your book, but rather with industry norms. For large chains to consider stocking you book, i.e. putting any copies on the shelf, your book needs to be at the 55% discount and returnable. This is "not negotiable." Smaller bookstores seek a 45% discount and ...


1

If you have only found one company you seem to be searching in the wrong way. I would start with broad terms like 'printing services' and narrow it down by location (to reduce shipping) or something similar. I've done this is the past when I wanted books and magazines printed. I've just tried it now and found a place two hundred metres away that would do ...


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