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Why to abandon an idea In considering the question of whether or not you should write an idea you don’t like, my instinct would be no. If you don’t like it, it will show in the writing. If you are bored writing it, you can guarantee that your reader will be bored reading it. How excited you are by a project always comes across on the page. Why to press on ...


11

It's often a good idea to note your ideas down the moment you have them and then look at them at a later point. This makes sure that you have an interest in it that lasts long enough to actually get something done and you can change some of the biggest things. Most stories are re-written / edited quite a few times before they are released. If you just can'...


11

Write. Write a lot. And then write some more. Though your daughter may be a very good writer, it's pretty unlikely that she's going to write anything publishable at her age. So the best thing for her to do would be to just write whatever she wants, and work on getting experience and effort. Focus on finishing things and getting breadth of experience. Try ...


11

I think I've written this before (or upvoted someone who has written it), but so what: You need a basic idea. Oh, you have one, good. You need a main conflict. Otherwise you do not have a story. That means your hero wants something and someone is putting obstacles in his way. Like Remeo wants Juliet, but their families are against their relationship. Hero ...


7

That's a really interesting question. What springs into my mind is wondering why you think it would be interesting to you as a writer, if not as a reader? I'd like to hear more on this, maybe with some examples. If not you, then who? Based on the information available, I'd agree with some of the other answers, that if it doesn't appeal to you as a reader,...


7

For book resources, there are many out there. Here's a small sampling: On Becoming a Novelist by John Gardener (and he wrote several other books on writing like The Art of Fiction) Aspects of the Novel by E. M. Forester Bird By Bird by Anne Lamott On Writing by Stephen King There are a couple of questions on this site that may help: This question has a ...


6

There are some good answers here. I'm finding the Snowflake method useful as well.


4

If she has a book that she feels has potential, then she should try sending it out to any agents that might be accepting manuscripts. At the very least she may be able to get some constructive feedback on what she has written and perhaps even some guidance on where to go from here. I'm not sure that I would encourage her to provide her age, because there is ...


4

An option that I see often used in November during NanoWrimo is to "free the plot bunnies" -- if an idea occurs to you (maybe a Leprechaun/Ghoul romance and a particular issue to solve), but you really don't like romances, you can post the sketch of the idea into a "plot bunnies" thread, and then anyone who DOES want to do a supernatural romance, but is ...


3

I am a discovery writer, for two reasons. First, I have tried plotting out stories, and for me that takes all the creativity out of writing, I stop caring about the story and give up. It feels like a job, and I think that shows in my writing. I don't feel I write authentically about the character's emotions and lines, when I know exactly how it will all turn ...


3

I'm not sure whether this will work for you, but this is what I did: I started with flash fiction (900 words). Then, gradually, began writing longer pieces (3000~4000 words). At the same time, I started posting my work on this site for feedback. Also, I asked grammar questions at https://english.stackexchange.com/ (since I'm not a native English speaker, ...


2

Read. Write. Read some more, in as many genres as possible. An English degree will be of use, but is by no means essential. A creative writing program will only be useful if the program is prestigious (ie she will make connections) and covers aspects of publishing also. She should also make sure the programs covers the genres she wants to write in (most ...


2

Just write. Seriously. Just write. Stop worrying about whether it sucks (it probably will). Write it. Get it out. Because then you can go back and fix it. You can't edit a blank page. But you can take lousy text and make it better. Study materials from the time I wish my story to be set in? If it's historical in any way, yes. Research is good. Take ...


2

I really don't have any special advice other than to just write. Don't worry about the quality of what you put onto paper, just commit it to paper. People will say "it's probably better than you think it is" but the fact is that it will probably be pretty bad. That's okay. Everybody's first draft is bad. Writing quality prose is all about rewriting. If you'...


2

Reading through your question above, I don't find your writing to be overly analytical or unemotional. You report quite clearly your desire for personal improvement and in your words, I can sense your emotional concern about your ability to write emotively. Seems to me that you are doing that already. At least when you are writing in the first person ...


2

I think the main question here is why are you writing? If it's for some work thing, you might want to get a second opinion to make sure it's engaging, so that you can fulfill the work requirements. If it's just for fun, I think the most important thing is if you are enjoying the actual writing process. Personally, I've written stories that I would never ...


2

If you will enjoy writing it that's all that matters. The advice I've had from every professional novelist I've had the privilege to speak to personally is clear on this: write what you want to write how you want to write it. Usually with an addendum or two about the opinions of critics, editors and/or publishers tacked on. If you enjoy working on a piece ...


2

CON: The reasons to not write something you wouldn't read are pretty easy and straightforward: You are a stand-in for your potential audience. If even you aren't interested in this idea, that audience may not exist. It's hard to do a good job writing something that doesn't engage you. If you're writing in a unfamiliar genre, your writing may appear cliched ...


1

Sometimes, I'll begin forming an idea, and then realize that the story wouldn't appeal to me as a reader, despite the fact that I have interest in it as a writer. If I wouldn't want to read the story, is writing it still a good idea? Yes, writing it is, but probably not polishing or publishing it. Write that story, and as you are going down a ...


1

A few months ago, I set out to improve my writing and this is what I did: I started journaling, reading short things like stories or interesting articles, and listening to audiobooks or video essays. I put the lyrics in front of me when listening to music. Anything with the English language that I could do in small periods of time, I did. I didn't ...


1

The most common type of question raised by would-be writers is some version of "why can't I write?" The most common type of answer is "just write." If you look through this site, you will find quite a lot of that sort of question, and that sort of answer. And it really does boil down to pretty much that. You are either going to spend a lot of time ...


1

This is a common problem. I myself conquered this only last year. There is no one reason and no two writers suffer from the same set of reasons in the same proportion. But here are some things to try out: Freewriting exercises - Whenever you feel like it, open up your note book or your word processor and just start writing. Start with any old nonsensical ...


1

I think the problem is that writing is work. The stuff you call 'prep work' is essentially daydreaming. All the usual suggestions will apply here, I think. Set a daily or weekly goal for yourself - an hour a day of writing, or five thousand words a week, or whatever seems challenging but achievable. If you have nothing to say, you can sit there and write ...


1

What I do is usually just sit down and write without thinking, then edit it later. I have a basic idea of a story, but it usually just happens as I go along.


1

To develop story for any novel, first you need to have a start and an end points. Now the whole story and the characters in it will be moving according to this final goal point. You can add as many characters as you want but one condition they need to support your story and shouldn’t go beyond your perception of the story because this will confuse the ...


1

getting expert advise is a great idea! I personally think she should go ahead and look for publishers. if she is truly talented and she truly wants to do this for a living, she might as well start now. and besides, what's the worst that can happen? (answer: they can say no)


1

Finish school. Go to a university. If her "book" is any good she could send query letters to agents and be prepared for a glimpse of reality. I can't think of any successful published authors (today) who are fifteen. Heck, a signing tour would require an adult along....


1

This, I think, is a writing prompt tool unlike any other. Whereas most prompts just start you off, this one can assist you with the continuation of your story. It provides multiple ways to get a prompt depending on your mood or goal. Whether you want a complete scenario, a starting scene, a goal, or a character, you just click a button. I recommend ...


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