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I'm not sure if it matches what you mean, but if you need a one-off throwaway POV, it's a great case for a prologue. In the Harry Potter series, about half the books actually start with one of these, taking on the POVs of Vernon, a caretaker and the prime minister respectively before ever getting to the main character's POV. Most of Dan Brown's books ...


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There are actually a few works that come to mind where much of the twist is that the "main character" is not the main character of the story. Perhaps one of the best examples is the Japanese film "The Hidden Fortress" which is an epic period piece about a war between feudal Japanese states... from the point of view of the comic relief. Naturally it played ...


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What Hink said. I once outlined a short story based on the assassination of Gambino crime family boss Paul Castellano. The story is true, but I want to create a POV of an unknown character that played a huge role in the hit, but in all actuality John Gotti was the main character. I did this by creating a fictional FBI agent who lead a surveillance team. ...


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I’ve seen quite a few books use this, where the POV switches from character to character every chapter. So maybe put in like “part one, part two” if you just need to switch the POV once as well as the name of the character that the POV is switching to. Or if it switches multiple times possibly do it every few chapters. It doesn’t really get more simple ...


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As @RayButterworth alluded to, character voice is key here, and fortunately, it's not limited to this situation; it's an essential skill for writing dialogue as well. Everyone speaks differently. Word choice is one aspect of this; do they prefer simple vocabulary, or flowery descriptions? Informal or formal modes of address? Perhaps they're usually quite ...


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So I would recommend reading the Animorphs and tie in series Megamorphs and "The _ Chronicles" to get an idea, but suffice to say, it's better to denote the speaker changes at the start of each chapter than to do font changes. Animorphs franchise actually dealt with the same problem having Five first person narrators in the main titles and Megamorphs (all ...


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With only two characters, alternating between roman and italic fonts would be fine. But with five characters, using five different type styles would be too confusing. Just make sure you have five very different characters. One should be able to read almost any paragraph and just know whose it is. If two of the characters are too similar (motives, ...


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False Protagonist The trope you are trying to use is called false protagonist. Searching this term will provide some famous examples of how it has been done, but basically: Begin as the false protagonist Introduce the real protagonist as an alternate POV Get rid of the false protagonist POV (usually by killing them)


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I don't know. Maybe the first line could be 'Call me Ishmael'. There is no requirement for the narrator to be the main character. Character focus often shifts in emerging plots. Personally, I try to write in an interactive, three-dimensional style. A recent work features a narrator (a white girl) telling the story about the problems her mixed-race sister ...


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