We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

10

Just write her like a person. There's really not much else to it. I know it may feel like girls are confusing and mysterious at your age, but honestly, in almost any situation, you should take the same approach to writing a female character as you would with a male character, with some minor caveats. When it comes to what goes on in the heads of people with ...


6

You are showing that the character has a lot of questions. Also that the character will do nothing but gape at the questions for some period of time. If you want to show her trying to figure things out, you want to show her figuring. For instance: What was this place? She wished she had caught a glimpse as they were brought in. The lack of windows made ...


4

This is common. As a reader, however, I deeply dislike this technique, and find it distracting. It breaks my suspension of disbelief, and reminds me I'm reading a story, not experiencing it with the character. So, knowing that at least some readers will feel that way, the question is a) whether or not it is worth it, and b) whether there is an alternate way ...


3

Kudos for bravery: Wow, I'm personally not sure that if I got the whole thing written 1st person, I 'd be able to handle completely changing perspective. Rewrite a chapter and see how it feels. I might also get my beta readers to read the chapter and give feedback about what they like. No right or wrong answers. I've read powerful stuff from both ...


2

I don't know if "Not now" changes the depth of the POV, but I would argue that both of those last two sentences are repeating the sentence before it. If it's so close to his chance, we know he can't afford an injury right now. There's a few other instances of repetition I might eliminate that make for more concise narration. so he could catch ...


2

I would honestly say to write her no other than you. Of course, the character will not have all of the same experiences, but you probably have a female who you are close to, who you can ask for help with that. I have run into this problem as well with my story. I am a female trying to write a male character, but the thing that has helped me the most is ...


2

You say you don't want to switch POVs between the two characters. I can see why, and I agree that it would probably hint at the final twist. This is kind of a difficult situation, but there's always a way around it. The two obvious options are to either ignore the haters and do what you were gonna do with switchign the POV at the end, or switch the POV ...


2

As the author of the story, with absolute freedom to tell your story anyway you want, you can use any POV you want in any scene you want. So yes, you can use an Omniscient POV for the prologue and 3rd person limited in the scenes of your chapters. I am told that 3rd Person limited is the most common POV used for writing these days because it is the easiest ...


1

Short answer: No. In general, there are plenty of novels that deal with separate issues even, that don't have a singular protagonist. The one book that comes to mind is "Your House is on Fire, your Children All Gone", which reads like a bunch of short stories, but overall is marketed as a "novel". You are free to write your stories any ...


1

R. A. Freeman invented the "Inverted" detective story, in which the reader is first shown the crime in detail, and then sees how the detective solves it. In most cases the first section is told from the criminal's PoV, and the 2nd from the detective's or an associate of the detectives (the Dr Watson role). But in some cases, the first section was ...


1

Third person unlimited! If your character is empathic (mind reader or just emotions?) you can have something very close to omniscient while maintaining limited omniscience - because your character has near omniscience when it comes to other people. I did something similar, where my MC could read minds. I treated the thoughts of others like a one-way ...


1

I think it really depends on what questions you are asking. For me, this isn't really annoying. The questions just make me wonder and curious. If you were to ask really obvious questions the reader might already be asking themselves, that might be annoying. But when you ask thoughtful questions that help the readers make predictions. I do have one suggestion ...


1

First I have to say: respect. I think it's great that you are highly motivated at such a young age and even willing to write in many genres. With that out of the way. I have to disagree about: all humans are mostly the same. This sort of thing leads to writing a Roman emperor as you would write a modern female radio host. This is the Hollywood approach and a ...


1

I see no problem with this and have seen it a few times before. As long as you make it clear that this new POV is not what it was earlier it will be fine. I would do this by starting a new paragraph with an extra empty line that clearly introduces the new POV OR putting an empty line with a few asterisks or other symbols between POV jumps. But whatever you ...


1

Scenes should break when the action is done so that we do not have the dull interconnection between two dynamic pieces of actions that move the story forward. Chapters should be a unit of story. This can be one scene, this can be many scenes. The important thing is it forms a complete part of the story. Mastering the art of breaking takes a lot of practice ...


1

What I think you are asking about are chapter breaks (or scene breaks) and how to use them. Chapter breaks are gaps in the middle of a chapter that are used, broadly speaking, to gloss over any unnecessary parts of your story. Mind you, that doesn't just cover the everyday details of being human that nobody wants to read about. What is unnecessary to a story ...


1

If you feel the very last end is jarring, drop it. This is purely a Question of style, which means either all that matters is what you feel, or you might like to join a week(end) seminar for writers where you could explore the topic in useful detail. What's 3rd person POV, "close," please? What might make this "objectively…" rather than ...


1

Things that work well in a first-person POV: Everything the reader needs to know is seen or done by a single character. You want to use less formal language in the narrative. You want to get into the main character's head. If there are things the reader needs to know, but the viewpoint character either won't do them or won't see them, you can use some form ...


1

After the book is read, no one really remembers what perspective it was written in. So perspective isn't necessarily important at all. Other aspects of your story are much more important. However, there are a few differences. The first-person perspective is the easiest for most beginning authors, however, it can only show what the POV character can see. If ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible