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You may want to look at some fix-up novels. These are works built up of smaller pieces of fiction that were often published separately first. Two such works are A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. and Operation Chaos by Poul Anderson. These give you an idea how such smaller stories can fit into a larger one.


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"The current plot" should be based in conflicting ideals and morals to begin with. That makes "plot based" and "morals based" betrayal the same. I suggest you read some stories that have more to say than "random plot activities." A good place to start is with Cold Light by Karl Edward Wagner. The core of the story is ...


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I use Excel or Word tables. There are key things I find work: Order events in chronological order and line up characters' story lines so they run in synch. Number the events and make a brief description of what happens at that point. No need to drill down to the minor details - keep it top level. Map the quality of each event in a character's story line ...


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If you're writing a novel, you even need to use multiple storylines. Most often, there is a love line in novels, and you can also tell more about the minor characters. Usually such novels combine detective story, mysticism, history and high prose. There is something similar in the book "Panserhjerte" by U Nesbø and "The Passenger" by Jean-...


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Any decent novel is going to have multiple plot lines, each containing most of the elements of plot that you listed. Not all characters or figures in a story are working towards the same goals - and often enough, even when they do have the same goals they have different routes to reaching them. Take a (relatively) new novel - The Far Side of the Stars by ...


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