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4

It sounds like your story is from the point-of-view of the dog. Maybe the dog is lost and wandering around the neighborhood when he sees the fliers everywhere, and connects the dots to something he saw in the past. Or maybe your story could be in two points-of-view, although that might be difficult to edit in depending on how far you're into the story. One ...


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No one can teach you to be a writer, but anyone can learn how to be a writer is on of my favorite axioms about writing. You’ve answered your own question, but rejected it as hokum when it is the truest and best and quickest path to becoming a better writer. If you rush through the setup of your story, in order to write the good stuff, it is entirely fine. ...


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This is the same challenge I am currently trying to work through, and this is what I've worked out so far. To minimize frustration and screaming at yourself how inept you are, work from low resolution to a higher resolution Start with a one sentence summary of your story. These are called loglines and are used to pitch stories to agents, publishers, and for ...


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Here's a cool exercise for you to try: When you finish your day, right before bed, take a pencil and a notebook (or your phone or computer if that's easier) and outline your day. You don't need to invent anything. Just outline the day that just passed and break it down into "scenes". How did you move from one scene to another? Maybe one scene ...


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How about you let the dog wander around and in the pictures there are always (more or less hidden) hints that the owner is looking for him. But the dog doesn't see them (maybe the flyers are just too high on the tree, or in a newspaper, or the owner is looking for him in the background). The children then see them and would perhaps like to tell the dog (&...


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Interesting question. In a text, it is difficult to mention things subtly, whereas in a movie, you can show things without giving away their meaning. For example, if there is an axe hanging on the wall in the movie, someone may or may not be beaten to death with it later. In the book, on the other hand, the reader would expect something to happen to it if it ...


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Multiple story lines are fairly common, and they are necessarily arising when multiple POV characters are separated for a significant length of time. I would personally differentiate between "action threads" and "full storylines". An "action thread" is when different characters engage in separate action and not aware of the ...


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Figuring out what scenes to have in the story depends mostly on two things: Knowing what you want to say Knowing how to say it Creativity is of course also important, but there needs to be a mix of creativity and craftsmanship. In fact, I think it's about 10% creativity and 90% craft, or something like that. What you want to say What you want to say will ...


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Full Disclosure - I'm not a fan of dream sequences. I can think of perhaps a handful of one-off dream sequences in books that I've enjoyed and felt added value. I can't think of a single recurring dream sequence that's improved a book I've read and these days I skim them at best. But this is only my preference/opinion - and I'm not arrogant enough to assume ...


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Maybe the person who finds and rescues the dog is holding one of the flyers. Upon recognizing himself in the photo, the dog imagines his owner desperately passing out flyers.


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