34

I would credit the actor but not their role if that's possible, credit them by name as part of an "and others" section for the parts with no lines. Or maybe disguise their role, instead of the character name use a title, like "roman guard number 4", adjusted to be materially appropriate of course.


33

Give the actor multiple roles. It's fairly common in small cast shows to have one or two actors filling all of the bit parts, as long as those parts don't appear on screen together (or even if they do appear on screen together – The 39 Steps (the play version) features a scene where an actor has to shake hands with himself). Now you can credit the ...


10

Every character must have a name. The name doesn't have to be a real name, but it needs to be something that identifies that character as unique. In a novel, you can get away without naming characters. But a play requires casting. If you are going to have a person on stage, they need to know which lines are theirs. The director needs to know who they ...


8

Even actors that play dead people in films get credit. A murdered hooker or mugging victim, for example, on a cop show. I am not sure about unnamed extras in a crowd scene, or shopping mall or street scene, but since your actor shows in the final scene, if there is an exception for extras, this doesn't apply. The character has name, presumably has lines, ...


7

Obviously, both female participation and female representation are important. Female participation is more immediately important, because you're dealing with your actual students, and it's crucial that the girls be able to participate just as much as the boys. That being said, this isn't a one-or-the-other case - quite the opposite, since the easiest way ...


5

I would say there's actually precedence for not crediting an actor if it would ruin the story; in the stage production of The Woman in Black, the actress who plays the ghost goes uncredited. (I don't have a copy of the program but the website only credits the two actors and their understudies.) She doesn't even take a bow at the end of the show; I assume ...


5

Dramatis Personæ The traditional character list is called dramatis personæ. It's a list of characters (speaking roles) and very brief descriptions (enough to pick them out in the scene), formatted to fit on one page. This comes at the front, so it can be referred to while reading. No spoilers, you'll want the script to stand for itself. The first read ...


5

A couple of thoughts. If I see a book or a movie that is advertised as being about an unpleasant subject, sexual abuse or racism or Nazi concentration camps or whatever, I generally avoid it. It's certainly not that I condone such things. Of course they're bad. But that's the point. I know they're bad. I don't want to wallow in the misery of it. I don't ...


4

Well. I'm learning as I go and I haven't seen the series. But here's what that sounds like to me. You've identified rhythm and meter. Maybe these can be imagined as dialog that varies in its staccato or legato elements. Here are a few more ideas. 1. There are different genres of music. (and different types of dialog can work.) One type of music is the blues. ...


4

Part of this speaks to the different strengths of different mediums. It's the kind of thing that can sound kind of dumb as an idea, and that probably wouldn't work all that well in a book, but could actually be very effective as dramatized onstage, where it can take on the aspects of a ritual. In terms of writing it, however, what you want to think about is ...


4

The audience believes him to be dead from other characters mentioning it. Would it be possible to not just mentioned his supposed dead, but show it in "cutscene" where the "other charater is metioning it? Like: Alfred: And how is Skipper Betty: That is terrible - I was told, that he was killed last yer in Venice by some unknown assasin New ...


4

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


4

The biggest challenge to any adaptation is letting it be its own work. Every medium has its own demands, and being too faithful to the original can keep the work from living again in the new medium. In general, novels are more internal than plays, have the added demands of vivid descriptive passages detailing the physical setting and the appearances of the ...


4

Well, the first one is certainly a "screenplay", and is the accepted standard for film and television (though sometimes television scripts are differentiated with "teleplay"). The second one looks like a script for a play. I believe "stage play" is a fairly established term for contrasting the two, and that "play script" and "theatre script" are also ...


4

I could do this in Word very easily -- Short Version: Create a Style called "Character Name" Indicate that the style "Dialogue" is what follows next. (that's on the first area of the create-a-style dialogue). Then in the PARAGRAPHS section of that Character Name Style, the second/advanced tab, choose "Keep-with-next" I do most of my editing in drafts-...


4

Stage productions aren't just about the script. In your corpse example, there are several ways to handle it and it depends on the director more than the playwright. The corpses pile up and then there is a marker to indicate the end of the act which resets things. The corpses turn back into actors and get up and walk away. The character falls over and dies ...


4

+1 Cyn, however, typically you use a designation (Woman #1, Cop #1, Kid #1) and always number sequentially from 1, using '#', and don't not use random numbers like 5 or 9. If you want to be specific on the crowd size, if you think that makes a dramatic difference, then be specific. (It can, a crowd of 6 is dramatically different than a crowd of 60). A crowd,...


3

Another free alternative is Trelby available for Windows and Linux. A free, multiplatform, feature-rich screenwriting program! Trelby is simple, fast and elegantly laid out to make screenwriting simple. It is infinitely configurable. Another paid alternative is Fade In available for multiple platforms (Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone/iPad, and Android.) It ...


3

For what you want to do, script writing, you have several options, paying or free. The best paying software truly specialized is Final draft It is a quite old soft, very well planned and relatively easy to use, but come with a price. For what I know it was at a time a kind of de facto standard in the industry, if that means something. The best free option I ...


3

My advice is to try and act out the parts, actually say the lines, make the movements, and so on. If necessary, use cardboard boxes or other cheap stuff (empty aluminum cans as wine glasses or a lantern) for your props. Use a sheet of paper with a name on it, put it on the floor for other actors. Use your living room as your stage, or your bedroom or kitchen ...


3

All the technical considerations really do come back to the fact that someone has to stage it. So from that point of view, you'd want to put yourself in the place of those choosing a play to do. Of course, what they are looking for could vary largely. Here are a couple of possibilities: High School Play - Lots of high schools do plays, so that makes up a ...


3

This is what I've heard/learned: Read a bunch of different kinds of material. You'll get your creativity stimulated and ideas will stir in your brain. You could also research things, or draw ideas - some other things to get your gears turning. Every idea has been done before. You just have to put your own spin on an idea, or invert a trope to be original. ...


2

Parenthetical remarks are used to describe the attitude, tone, or action for the actor who is speaking. Stage direction describe whatever's going on on the stage in general. There's a bunch of different "standard" or "accepted" formats used to accomplish it. The name of a character who is speaking should be capitalized and centered, just like in a ...


2

I suggest you talk to someone who does historical monologues professionally. I've found that there is no substitute when entering into an endeavor for speaking with someone who has done it before. I can recommend "Barefoot" Bill Pacer as someone who has done things very similar to what you propose.


2

While I completely agree with Chris, I'd like to make a few suggestions concerning the 'how'. Approach 1: I'd suggest first writing / drawing a schematic of the plot, in order to get away from the written text. This means that no sentences can be taken out, just ideas and topics. Then, keep away from the play for some time and will yourself to forget it ...


2

Convention is a little unclear on this, as they are not terribly common in modern theatre. That said, I've seen two methods used: Either it is a stage direction like you've used it, or -- and this is what I see when a writer is particularly fond of using them often and the constant direction would get repetitive, or the character slides between diegetic and ...


2

The character of Death in Federico García Lorca's Blood Wedding (Bodas de Sangre) is not supposed to be credited in the program. I note that she (Death being a beggar-woman in the play) is not in the list of characters in the script (see page 4) and this is a specific instruction by the author (page 50). I can’t tell if the intention is to name that ...


2

If you want your play to be performed, write with a particular theatre or acting troupe in mind, or a particular type of venue/ensemble. Research the sort of plays that they actually put on and think about duration, number of characters, technical complexity etc. as well as style and subject matter. Try to involve potential performers or venues as early as ...


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