5

No, that would be dishonest. If you say "I am an illustrator", that means that you draw illustrations. The fact that I bought a piece of beef at the grocery store does not make me a cattle rancher. I own the beef, but I didn't raise the cow. You can say, "I wrote this book and I also own the copyright on the illustrations" or something to that effect. If ...


3

Since you do already own these illustrations, you can use them as a self-publisher, or, in the case that a traditional publisher does want both, you should be entitled to all the royalties without splitting them. However, the original illustrator should still be credited. It's at-the-least unethical to claim their work as yours, even if you have legal ...


2

Not a lawyer. You paid an illustrator to provide artwork for your book. You (supposedly) own the right to publish the artwork - that's what you paid the artist for. But that doesn't make you the illustrator of the work. You are not an author/illustrator. You are an author. The illustrator would need to be credited as such. The book would be "written by X, ...


2

Quite frankly, it all depends on your contract with your publisher. If the publisher is already publishing your series (as a series) the publisher probably has a contract for that series. If you wrote a novel and now want to write a series based on that novel, a series clause may not be in your contract but boiler plate contracts may cover derivative ...


1

I'm not a publisher but I have read a whole, whole lot. So this is based on my observations. Pictures tend to be full-page, and tend to be black-and-white with only a few exceptions. Placement is usually one of the following: The pictures are all in one place, usually in the middle of the book There are pictures interspersed throughout the book, on pages ...


1

I think it depends on the specific style/genre as well as your relationship with the publisher or agent. There are formal queries and then there are chats you have with someone in a position to get your work to publication. In the comic book field, pitching more than one piece is more common, even to someone you don't know. At least my spouse does it. ...


1

Someone already answered this question online. Link: http://writersrelief.com/2010/01/11/query-letters-when-not-to-talk-about-multiple-books-including-sequels-a-series-and-other-projects/ Books designed to be part of a series. Certain books are by their very nature meant to be part of a series—such as some fantasy and mystery novels. But always keep ...


1

Agents and publishers usually publish guidelines for how to reach out to them with a manuscript. Most reputable publishers will only work through agents, because agents filter out a lot of the really terrible manuscripts that come in. (Google "slush pile" for some interesting history.) That said, given your background, you are probably better off working ...


1

Hello and welcome to the group! Since you say you have already checked the contract and there is no clause relating to series, I'd say it depends on the reason the series was dropped. Just as an example, if the early books were selling really well but the publisher went out of business, an author could have luck selling to a new publisher with proven sales, ...


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