9

I'd say it depends on what those numbers are. Writing "five in the morning" instead of "5am" isn't going to make too much of a difference to readability. In fact, depending on the general tone of your story, that slight bit of extra eloquence can really enhance it. However, once you get into longer numbers, using the actual numerals really helps with ...


9

Hard rule? No. Style guide? Yes. As an aspiring author, you absolutely need to pick a style guide and use it or these problems will keep picking at you. I like The Chicago Manual of Style. As such: Born late in the year, Adam was the only kid in his small, fourth-grade class that had already turned eleven. Every morning, he got up at exactly 4:56 a.m., ...


9

five and a half years No hyphens. Hyphens are for adjective phrases: It was a five-and-a-half-year journey. You also don't use the hyphen with the fraction. 51⁄2 years


8

In Chicago Manual of Style, they recommend spelling it out. "At five foot one, he was as thin as a rail." In some cases a hyphen may help avoid ambiguity. If it's being used as an adjective, you might add hyphens. "His five-foot-two-inch body was thin as a rail." You can use numbers if you prefer—"He was 5'2" and small for his age"—no spaces, and be ...


7

Translator's notes, prefaces, and introductions are numbered using Roman numerals so those pages can be safely cited without duplication or ambiguity. It is customary to number the primary text with Arabic numbers starting at 1. But as the front matter is clearly 'before' page 1, you have to make accommodations for it in your numbering scheme. A new set of ...


7

Digits tend to be read faster and are less important. Spelling out numbers takes longer to read and are emphasized. So there are two things to consider: 1) How do people think of dates? Do you think of this year as "twenty seventeen" or "two thousand seventeen"? Was Bill Clinton president in the "nineteen-nineties" or the "one thousand nine hundred nineties"...


6

In a comment under your question, you said that you mostly follow APA style. This is what the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) says: 4.13 Hyphenation en dash: An en dash is longer and thinner than a hyphen yet shorter than an em dash and is used between words of equal weight in a compound adjective (e.g., ...


6

While you don't need to follow a style guide here (except your publisher's of course), it's helpful to look at them. The AP Style Guide (Associated Press) is a good one because it's for American newspapers. Newspapers work hard to bring in a large range of readers, so they aim most of their articles at a high school (or even Jr. High school) reading level (...


5

I would be careful about saying most style guides. For instance, here's what The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), 10.58, says, referring to its own guidance as well the International Symbol of Units (SI) format: In SI usage as in general usage, a space usually appears between the numeral and any abbreviation or symbol. Contrary to general usage, however, ...


4

For formatting S.I. units the standards are posted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology link. To conform to the standard there should be a space between the numerical value of the quantity and the unit: "9 mm". The usual "9mm" is a non-standard format that has become accepted in common usage (for better or worse). If you are doing ...


4

I will provide quotes from The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed., and from The Editors Blog. The links to Chicago are behind a paywall and, unfortunately, can only be viewed if you have a subscription. While these generally hold true across most style guides (in both English in general and literature specifically), other style guides may give different ...


4

There are two parts that impact issues like this. The style guides you link are in use for documents that are frequently displayed and transferred between highly variable devices and services - The presence of characters such as the Degree Symbol are still not completely reliable, and using them may result in unexpected values being displayed. As robust as ...


3

As a reader, if I find a novel in which the author has flouted standard writing style by not spelling out small, short (in terms of word length) numbers, say, writing "100" instead of "one hundred" or, even better, "a hundred" (given the implied precision of this kind of number) -- I'm likely to close the book right then, because neither the author nor any ...


3

[Freely quoting from Office Support. The following text is entirely from the link provided. I do not think I have anything to add to it.] Microsoft Word does not support multiple heading-numbering schemes in a single document or master document. When you work with documents that contain both chapter headings and appendix headings, the headings must not use ...


3

+1 user37826, that is my answer. I understand you are showing the +/- in the superscript and subscript, respectively, but I don't like this format at all; for one it doesn't give the confidence level being quoted. 90%? 95%? 99.9%? is that a 3-sigma or 5-sigma result? If I were your advisor I'd tell you to stop trying to save space or be "efficient" and ...


3

"Three million" and "3 x 106" potentially mean different things. Since the original author wrote "3 x 106", my bias would be to leave it (other than changing the lower case x to a multiplication sign) unless you are confident that you aren't changing the meaning. In standard scientific writing, "3 x 106" often means that there was a measurement with only a ...


3

When you select one way of number notation, stick to it. "Three million" is appropriate in a text where readability is more important than precision, like "The intensity was three million times stronger than the reference". Whenever the number that you use needs to be referenced of copypasted, use a numeric form. Scientific notation is a de-facto standard ...


3

I took a class with Ellen Meister, who said that it doesn't really matter until your book becomes published, that the publishers will decide how to write the numbers according to their rules.


2

Haven't done this lately and I don't have Word on this machine, so this may not be 100% accurate, but: Insert a section break (new page) at the point where the numbering should change. Go into headers/footers. Insert a field for page numbers where you want it in the first section, formatted as Roman numerals. Go to the next section (there's a button ...


2

I recommend you don’t write it in feet and inches at all. Those are antique, non-standard measurements that are understood by maybe 10% of the world population, and that number is shrinking in size every single day. You can not only make your manuscript understandable by the whole world if you use modern, standardized measurements, you can also future-proof ...


2

Answer on the purpose: "Front-matter pages are traditionally numbered in lower-case Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, iv, v, etc.), which prevents renumbering the remainder of a book when front-matter content is added at the last moment, such as a dedication page or additional acknowledgments." (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_design) "The ...


2

Most schools have their courses listed on their website. Middle Schools/Junior High, High School, Colleges. And the course titles vary. I've never seen Two though. I would do it to match how schools do it. My 8th grade daughter is currently taking "Math 1." This is actually 9th grade math. In our current school district, they got rid of Algebra and ...


2

This depends on your style guide. If you're following APA, all of your examples look good to me. My reasoning: I bought nine apples: The number is under 10 and no special rules apply. We need 5 mL acid for this reaction: It is written before a "unit of measurement", so it is written as a number. Jack, you already did it three times!: The number is under 10 ...


1

Ultimately this relies on the definition of tabular matter (or rather table). And I’d say the definition is pretty simple: tables have rows and columns (and content is therefore arranged in a grid). What you have does not have columns so it’s not a table. (Also a table would probably abstract out the word “topics” and put it in the table head.) If it ...


1

The rule I was taught in school was to spell out numbers that are less than or equal to 20, with various exceptions. But this is a matter of style. Different organizations have different style guides. If your company has a style guide, follow it. If not and they have an editor who has his own idea of proper style, then unless he's blatantly wrong or his ...


1

According to this guide, which uses Microsoft Word 2016 for its screenshots (but things shouldn't have changed too much for other versions), you can restart footnote numbering for each section of your work, and you can pick the number format separately for each section. To open the footnotes configuration menu: Within that menu, to restart the footnotes ...


1

My first inclination would be to write it the same way it's written in school materials. If the course catalog or class schedule says "Algebra 2", that's what I'd write. I'd do something different if there was potential for confusion. Like to take a contrived example, if there was a class call "Medical IV", there might be confusion whether "IV" is intended ...


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