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My take on this comes from many years of supporting someone with crippling anxiety and depression, listening to them talk about suicide and learning what makes them think that way. I can’t answer the question in your edit (which Tau has covered amply) but I will try to answer the question in your title, and hope that it helps you consider whether a suicide ...


3

This is indeed a real danger if you write about suicide. The effect is known as copycat suicide or suicide contagion, and it can indeed be triggered by reading - one of the most famous early examples was The Sorrows of Young Werther by Goethe, a novel in which the protagonist commits suicide which came out near the end of the 18th century and caused a spike ...


0

If you have a publisher, you can leave it to them. And as @user5645 stated, you probably won't get a choice. For me, I choose to design my own covers. (I don't have a publisher, so that's why) If you chose to take the path that I've chosen, I would suggest doing some research. Research what makes a good cover, what sells the best, what fits the genre, etc. ...


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shot her quizzical looks said, "what did you say again?" I can't think of anything else that is not already above. Peace out


-1

I hate that stereotype too, but there is some truth behind it. Men do cry, but not as often. It's probably due to society, and hormones too. Society raises men to cry less, and to be seen as "less weak" or "not weak." When I say hormones, it is because of something very interesting. When given hormones, trans people tend to have a change in both emotions and ...


2

This a fun story. The central conflict is "what did the murdered friend have to do with the wife's disappearance?" and, really, the present murder is the subplot that is an obstacle to the resolution of that real central conflict. Regardless, plots and subplots normally feature all or nearly all the usual beats, otherwise the subplot is really just an ...


3

Firstly, I think your concept sounds very intriguing. In answer to your question, I would recommend the 'present' plot should be your main plot, and the missing wife should be the subplot. Although the subplot might be more highly emotional, it's still in the past and the actions driving things forward will still be the recent murder, as that's what your ...


2

I think that the two plot lines must be related if the novel, taken as a unit, is to make sense to the reader. But "related" could mean many different things. The question does not provide much in the way of context about the disappearance of the detective's wife. Was the marriage happy or not before the disappearance? Was it possible that the wife's ...


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