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This appears to be getting overly complicated. "Said" and "spoke" have different meanings. Once you have established that John signs, the dialogue carries on as normal. This is why the 'said' tag is rarely sufficient. "I really need to pee!" signed John. "We gotta go," explained Bob. "Have I offended somebody?" asked Dave. "Right now!" insisted John. "...


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I liked the ideas given so far. I would suggest that like any problems encountered while writing, solve this creatively. Making sure the mute person can be communicated with allows you to throw in a new character who translates for them. This translator may be a spouse, a child, a close friend. They may solve your problem but remember they too should have ...


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While I like the answers provided, there is a context in which that doesn't work - fast paced conversation. Having one or more people signing and others using English to have an argument sounds like fun, but for normal conversation you can skip a few 'Harold said' by virtue of the fact that there are only two people in the conversation. If you have a similar ...


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My new novel will probably have a glossary because of necessity it will have Arabic Norse and archaic English words though not many. All should be roughly clear from context but the glossary is.tger for those who want to double check. Eg. Rujan of the ship. Rujan ,,, captain. Ran with her screaming child to the maristan. Maristan ,,,, hospital.


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Similar to other answers, I tend to do any language that is not the language of my novel (read: English) as translations. Typically to denote a language barrier between speakers and non-speakers I will give the foreign language an additional puctution to denote it's translated to English such that for a character using sign language I would do something ...


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Maybe something like John signed, “The lights on the Christmas tree are very beautiful.” Honestly, just replacing ‘said’ with ‘signed’ would be good. As long as the reader knows that the character is signing and not speaking, it’s good.


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Is it "permissable", for purposes of my novel, to create a second daughter? Yes, that is called historical fiction. Given the time, the daughter could be an illegitimate child of Grand Duke Vladimir; it was not unusual in the 1870-ish time frame for royalty to have affairs with multiple women, including servants of their own house or in the houses they ...


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I'm not exactly sure: do you want to write first and then try to find someone? But ghostwriting is more about answering the need of someone, so it's the opposite. What you are requesting is closer from traditional publishing than ghostwriting: I write and then I sell. I don't see any platform doing what you request; if you're searching for freelance ...


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As mentioned, copyright is automatic. The best form of defense is to only submit physical copies of your work until a publisher agrees to buy it from you to publish. This preserves the only digital copy on files you're able to access. Make sure you have a change log of your main digital copy, or attach to e-mails to yourself An even dumber poor man's ...


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They can and they will steal your work if they can. It happened to me with a music teaching book I wrote years ago. They changed it enough that it was their own and there was nothing I could do about it. Biggest music publishing company out there - naming no names.


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So, you want to create a fictional order in a fictional settings that uses the name of the Templars as well as other historical organisations? So, kinda like the Templar Order in the Dragon Age video game? If nothing happened to Bioware for that decision (and nothing did), then you're safe. It's not like this is the first time a historical person or group ...


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As I remember, the Templars were accused of heresy and disbanded 700 years ago, so the Templar organization will not sue you for libel. As I remember, in Sir Walter Scott's novel Ivanhoe (1819) one OF the main villains who plot with Prince John against King Richard, and who attack and kidnap innocent travelers, is a Templar knight, Sir Brian de Bois-...


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