New answers tagged

0

This is "serial" or "episodic" adventure, like many TV shows. Traditionally, such adventures are tied together by some overarching goal or frame story. There must be some reason the character is collecting the items. In The Odyssey, Odysseus endured obstacles along the way to getting home. In The Labors of Hercules, Hercules served his cousin's bizarre whims ...


-1

Nel here! If you think the character is too perfect than, depending on the setting, she can be bullied for something like a visible scar(like on her face)from some kind of surgery. She could have a really meaningful flaw like, idono, rising slight paranoia! Yeah, probably not. Maybe Making her be insecure or having a deep change of heart. Make sure she ...


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What a lot of cobblers, I have purchased many shorts of the cfnm genre, and boy oh boy, some can be very graphic.


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Is there a name for this kind of novel? As others have pointed out, it could easily be called "serial storytelling", or even more specifically, "fetch quest of the week". What you describe, however, also reminds me of a type of narrative called "frame story". Examples include, but are definitely not limited to: Boccaccio's Decameron; Chaucer's Canterbury ...


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The things we don't write well are the things that we don't observe well. If your characters don't have flaws, it's because you don't like to see the flaws in yourself and others. Try taking an objective, non-judgemental, deep look at the weaknesses of yourself and the people closest to you. Are you greedy, selfish, quick to anger, slow to forgive? We all ...


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If you are willing to be mean to yourself, maybe listen to sad songs, or read sad things, or tap into past memories of when you felt sad/heartbroken yourself (this applies to any emotion). Remember how your body responded then. Maybe, if you get involved enough, you'll feel reactions during the exercise (if you can even call it that). Then you can ...


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I've heard that a good character has strengths and weaknesses, motivation, and backstory. If you flush out a backstory, you will have given your character experiences that shape who they are. How would _______ event affect them as a person? You could the real-life research method in another answer along with this to get a realistic effect. But if you have a ...


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This would be serial storytelling, which is quite commonly found on television these days, but originated in literature, though many of the most famous "serial" books are typically sold with the complete story intact, making it the literature equivelent to binge watching a season of television on Netflix. Originally, the format was used by many authors to ...


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I think I understand your problem and I don't have an answer to your question about a name. However, I do have a suggestion: write all the separate stories and then see if an overall conflict emerges or occurs to you. It is possible that while you are editing the first draft an idea will come to you or you may be more able to impose an idea. Character ...


6

Do your research, but only after the first draft The first draft is usually written to be butchered anyway. A big problem in writing is being too precious with your first draft, and not changing major problems because you don't want to redo the work. Kill two birds with one stone, and do the research specifically to poke holes in your first draft. This ...


1

First: I apologize if anything I say makes light of or dismisses mental/emotional distress. As someone who struggles with AD(H)D, someone telling you the equivalent of, "Get over it," is not helpful. That being said: perhaps at least some of the anxiety is fear of failure masquerading itself as FOMO. You don't want to fail, so you latch onto reasons to not ...


1

Since this question has received no real (non-nonsensical) answers, I will post an answer based on my own investigations and what other experienced authors and publishers have said about it in other websites by making a few quotations that deal with this question. [One can still sell it to a traditional publisher], but if you [do] sell it to a ...


2

Generally it's a bad idea to do anything that does not serve a purpose for the story. Your readers will wonder why you spent their time on it. If how these characters meet and become friends matters for the story you're trying to tell, show it. If not, don't. The writers of Avatar: The Last Airbender had to show Aang becoming friends with Korra, Sokka, ...


5

Hemmingway has some solid advice (tip 5). Don't describe the emotion, describe the thing that caused the emotion. Imagine a young couple, expecting their first child, and suffering a miscarriage. It's probably very difficult to describe accurately what that feels like, but even if you succeeded, it wouldn't make the reader actually feel it. If, however, ...


4

Use research and reference Visual artists now that the best shortcut to making a drawing more realistic is to use research and reference. Here is an example (from Scott McCloud's Making Comics) of the difference between a gas station drawn purely from the imagination, and one based on reference images: No matter how good your imagination is, the details ...


1

Well, to be honest, this is a perfect example where you want to show how the character is feeling. So have a thinking about what your character is doing in response to this heartbreak and insert this into the scene. Like, I have a character in my novel, in one part, she is nervous when she is ambushed (quite by accident) by another character at a quiet ...


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Pick a phrase from your novel that is significant. 'The Day Before' Worried it doesn't stand out? Try restructuring it to make it slightly more unique - and make sure that still fits. 'Before The Day'? Bend your perspective. 'After Yesterday'? Run the words through www.thesaurus.com and see if something new pops. 'Auld Lang Syne'? Make something up '...


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The first question I would ask is: what is your story about? Is there a theme that it's trying to address? Furthermore, is the story more about the character and how the character changes, or about things that happen in the world around her? The degree to which a flaw is "deep" depends greatly on where the main conflict of the story is. I know this is a ...


5

One: the most common mistake is to confuse personality flaws for character flaws. Personality flaws are superficial e.g talks loudly on phone or chews with an open mouth. Character flaws need to be deeper and meaningful. Is your character torn between moving away to another state for her career and taking care of her ill mother who can't travel with her? ...


1

One technique is to read your story through and highlight phrases that pop out. Then choose one or a few and tweak them if necessary. Take your short list to your writing group for feedback.


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I feel you should focus on mapping out your plot, and doing so without tropes in mind. Tropes are not a bad thing, but equally, they are not good things. Just looking through TV Tropes, you can see how often tropes are replicated in all genres and media forms. I know my novel does contain tropes. It's been argued, from an academic point of view, that in ...


1

It works for the very few people who are A Stephen King. It does not work for the masses of wannabees who think they can write like Stephen King by pantsing with Smith's approach or other variation of pantsing.


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I think you should try completely avoiding tropes, but that's sort of hard to do in a vampire story. Tropes make books, movies and shows more predictable, but like I said, it's kinda hard to avoid in something about vampires. I think that if you are going to include tropes, make it a really interesting trope or one that isn't used often.


3

I think adding more "tropes" will just make it confusing, unless you have a plan for how to use them to create conflict. Certainly there have been many stories (and series) focusing on many tropes: Vampires vs. Werewolves vs Witches. But the authors of those stories have a coherent plot in mind; for example all of the factions are going after the same ...


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I lost the count of how many times United Nation has been used in all sorts of fiction. IMO as long as you are not defaming them you are fine. As regards to obfuscating names as Arcanist Lupus had suggested, I would recommend to exercise more caution since Jack Daniel's cease and desist letter. A franchise chain might get their pants in the knot even if ...


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As a general rule, it's fine to use real organizations as part of a fictional story. Your characters can eat at Burger King, volunteer with Doctors without Borders, or listen to NPR without any issues. Doing so can help ground a story in reality, and fill in readers expectations without having to add superfluous exposition. That said, you should pay ...


1

This question is too vague, unclear, and localized for the rest of the world to be able to help you. Your best bet would be to approach the publishers in UAE or, if you do not know how to contact any, then approach that country's government which would certainly have at least some services for the writers to assist in finding venues.


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