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It's done all the time, Charles Stross's first two Laundry Files "novels" were in fact collections of earlier short fiction, albeit somewhat edited. The reverse is also done, this is called serialisation where large works are broken into small sections for publication in magazines. You do need to make sure your contractual obligations are compatible with ...


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You can't plagiarize yourself. It's actually pretty common for writers to turn a short story (or several) into a novel. Your only issues are about copyright. If you self-publish the stories, you of course retain the copyright. If you use a traditional publisher (including magazines, websites, etc), you will have a contract (if you do not have a written ...


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Consider Nightfall by Issac Asimov & Robert Silverberg. The novel was published in 1990, but it was actually an expansion of a short story that Asimov originally wrote in 1941. Unless you have a contract with a publisher that legally prevents it, you can do whatever you like with your own work.


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There is absolutely no rule against it, but if your set of names crosses a certain threshold of recognizability you will have to reckon with the perceived reference to another source, intentional or not. Readers accept intertextuality and will look for a deeper meaning when they spot a coincidence like this. The more unusual any given name is, the more ...


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Of the three best selling book series for boys of an elemenatry/middle school age, all three were written by authors who syled their name thus: [first name initial][second name initial] [full surname] (J.K. Rowling, K.A. Applegate, and R.L. Stein, in order of most success to least). Of those three, only Stein was a man. Both J.K. Rowling and K.A. ...


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There are two main ways around this: Hide your identity as an author or publish something else first. For the first, pseudonyms are your friend--and this is one of the only good reasons to have one. For the second... well, I'd say it is obvious enough?


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That depends a great deal on how common the names are and how well known the other book is. I've never read "Miss Peregrine", I think I vaguely heard of it somewhere, but it's not particularly famous or iconic. And as you say, Emma, Oliver, and Jacob are all fairly common names in English. So I don't this this would be much of an issue. The more common the ...


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The answer to your question depends on how strongly the set of names is associated with the preexisting work of fiction. Not just the individual names, but the set of names together. For example, individually Romeo and Juliet are common enough names, if you set your story in Italy. However, if you name the main characters in your story Juliet and Romeo, it ...


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Plot twists are actually easier to pull off in first person, because the first person perspective shapes what the audience sees. There's a famous plot twist at the end of The Sixth Sense, and the clues are all present throughout the movie, but the audience doesn't pick up on it, because we see the entire movie from the perspective of the protagonist. Make ...


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Is she supposed to be aware of everything happening around her and to her if I'm writing in the first person? Yes. But she can be aware and not understand. She can see and describe things she doesn't understand, but perhaps the reader does. Likewise, she may be involved in conversations, or overhear conversations, that only in retrospect make sense to her....


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There's a MasterClass from Judy Blume on creating stories for kids which might be useful to you as well as R. L. Stine's class.


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Author talking points and author background might give a reviewer or journalist something to write about. 1st-time fiction authors are – publicity wise – a dime-a-dozen. If there is a way to talk about the book and it's author, some "angle" that suggests the main character is unique and authentic because it comes from a unique and authentic experience, that'...


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Narrating what she did, instead of where she is from, is always a good idea. Here's why! What she did (and what she experiences) is immediate, we can imagine the scene. If she is bullied, or discriminated against, we can identify. Where she came from doesn't really tell us much, it is indirect and requires the reader to infer from a location or setting how ...


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If (as you say here) the vampires despide and hunted down, then it may be possible (if it does not conflict with other parts) introduce them out of blue in something like this (yeah everyone knows about vampires, there just was not reason to show it, until now): ... and so I stopped the running boy and asked him "what it is all about?" "Don't you know? ...


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If there is a problem in your story, the problem is earlier in your story. You don't need to explain the element earlier, but you need something--anything--to get the reader prepared. The way to know if your current execution is problematic is to ask a reader. If the answer is yes, find a way to tip off the reader some time earlier. It's a skill that ...


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Was it a short lived trend to write novels this way? I don't believe so. I've been reading novels for over fifty years, I have several hundred of them on my home bookshelves. I would have noticed a trend like that if it appeared since about 1965. As for your title question: Yes, but not so much the items you quote. Those kinds of stylistic things are a ...


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This raises an alarm bell for me. The reason is that magical creatures aren't just scenery. They have a psychological and archetypal dimension --they carry certain thematic resonance along with them. If your book isn't built around vampire themes, and if they aren't foreshadowed, then introducing them late in the book might be a symptom of thematic ...


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As other Answers mentioned, this can be done is a valid way for world building, however you can also make it a complete shock and turn it into a plot twist. There are many bad ways to do this, but there are also many good ways to do it. If you make it a shock to everyone all the time, then it's a bad plot twist. You will lose the readers ability to be ...


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Some of the best worldbuilding is done gradually. If you introduce all the elements of your fantasy world very near the beginning, you risk boring your readers with a massive infodump. It's often better to introduce it piece by piece, as long as you do so in a way that seems 'natural'. This is why a lot of fantasy follows the standard Tolkien motif of the ...


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OP: So, will suddenly adding this species to the mix over twenty chapters in throw the reader off (in a bad way)? It certainly can do that, but you might get away with it. One way is to spotlight the fact that you haven't previously mentioned them, if you can think of a reason nobody has mentioned them in the first twenty chapters. Perhaps some magical ...


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There's nothing inherently wrong with this at all - the important thing is that the introduction seem organic. Is there a reason why the existence of vampiric creatures wouldn't have come up (or even been known) to the existing POV characters before this point? If so, and it's in keeping with your world (you wouldn't just introduce actual magical wizards ...


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If you've established your world as one with fantasy species, it's okay if you don't mention every one early on. Lots of novels and screenplays throw new species into the mix later on and that's fine, so long as you've established that your world is one where similar species already exist. Novels such as A Discovery of Witches establish a couple species ...


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I think you can look to Harry Potter for inspiration to answer your question. Every book introduced new species. Some at the beginning of the book, and others in the middle. But they were always introduced before they became important to the story. In the first book, the dragon egg showed up with no real fanfare and became something that fleshed out Hagrid'...


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My two cents: Some of the examples others have cited, like 1984, or other similar novels like Animal Farm or Brave New World have endings where the main characters lose, but I think that's because these books aren't about the characters, they are about painting a picture of some ugly aspect of society. There's a sort of catharsis that comes from identifying ...


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Yes, provided that it were not inevitable from the outset Suspense and uncertainty are vital ingredients to many a great novel. When it comes to making a good narrative, the outcome itself is less important than how we get there. Readers are often excited by outcomes which could have gone another way but for a few unlucky occurrences (for a classic case ...


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When I was much younger, my actual "definition" of a "novel" was a book that ended unhappily. Old Yeller, The Red Pony, Where The Red Fern Grows...decades ago that was what was in the libraries, so I read them. All the examples that people are giving of "successes" are from books written many decades ago. They probably wouldn't have much of a market now, ...


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Yes. A sterling example is the "Parker" series of books by Donald Westlake, written under the pen name Ricard Stark. Parker is a "bad guy" but the protagonist of the series, and always wins in the end, usually against the odds. These books challenge the notion of what a "bad guy" is, which is what you must do in your books if your bad guy is going to win. ...


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Your girlfriend is correct that the bad guy winning at the end limits your audience, and will anger some readers. But it's important that you write your own book, not the book you think you should write. If you really connect with the material, and you execute it well, there are readers out there who will be as passionate about it as you are. A book aimed at ...


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I think Amadeus hit on the core of the issue with doing this - "good" ultimately triumphing over "evil" is by far the more popular archetype, and for very good reasons. Setting aside the idea of "good guys" and "bad guys" for a moment but thinking about it in terms of "protagonist" and "antagonist", the reader is (typically) intended to sympathize with the ...


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Consider giving a pyrrhic victory to the good guys in the end as an alternative. A Pyrrhic victory is a victory that inflicts such a devastating toll on the victor that it is tantamount to defeat. Someone who wins a Pyrrhic victory has also taken a heavy toll that negates any true sense of achievement. (source) It still resembles a tragedy, it still ...


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It is perfectly fine for your story to end with the "bad guy" winning. Consider for example George Orwell's 1984: He loved Big Brother Complete and utter defeat. 1984 is one of last century's masterpieces. @Wetcircuit mentions tragedy in a comment, for good reason. Tragedy does not necessarily imply that the "bad guys" win, but it does imply the "good ...


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You can do it. But the expectation has to be set that this is possible, and it should be written like a tragedy. The market for such a book may be small, but it isn't nonexistent. Check out the grimdark genre (third law series is an example). People do buy into it and even like it. But it's unlikely to sell as wide as something that has a feel good ending. ...


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No, I don't think it would be okay for a bad guy to win in the end. Readers don't like it. They read for fantasy fulfillment. Happy endings outsell unhappy endings ten to one; publishers and studios don't like unhappy endings. They want something positive in the end. Especially from a writer that has no following; if you were already a best-selling author ...


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Be consistent. It can be a narrative technique where the main character is first person and the others are third person. This is useful for if you want to hide things from the reader. The main character will have their flawed perception, and the third person view can be used to explain how characters in the other parts of the story are progressing. It can ...


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Can it be effective instead to move the Inciting incident to the very beginning? No. Obviously that is my opinion, and you may find some decent writing that has done that; good writers have broken just about every rule in writing. So instead of "rules" maybe we call them "guidelines" and common characteristics of what we usually see in best selling writing....


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