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5

Plot is the dramatization of the lessons the character learns. So, if you have to pause the plot for the character to learn a lesson, something has gotten out of sync. "Show, don't tell" may be overused, not-always-applicable advice for novels, but when it comes to life lessons, it's non-negotiable. The problem is that you want your character to ...


3

Message via story Your intuition is probably right. The best way to convey a message is via Story. The choices of people, plot and setting should/will/may tie into a message. I would continue working with scenes and action, and stay clear of the magic potions for a little longer. The best way to convey a message is by not giving the reader anything that even ...


0

There is no real possibility of defining which books - or other forms of story "should" have sequels. Could you even define “sequel”? That by itself might give useful Answers? There could easily be a sequel to Lord of the Flies; it just didn't matter to Goldsmith or appear to anyone else. Only retrospect might think it strange the Philosopher's ...


1

To add another example, Kouta Hirano and Type-Moon both started out making erotic works. Hirano wrote straight-up hentai and Type-Moon's original works were eroge. Both of their pasts aren't greatly hidden, and in fact the later non-pornographic works they are more famous for (Hellsing and Fate/Stay Night and Tsukihime) actually involve the exact same ...


1

In the real world there's a concept called nominative determinism. The concept is that people are drawn to areas of work which fit their name. For example, Robert Pipe being a plumber. Of course, no one thinks this is an iron clad rule (there's probably plenty of Pipes who are certified public accountants). But what validity it has probably has to do with ...


1

My opinion regarding "meaningful" names is that they're good in child/teen stories and very good in fairy tales but in more serious literature they just spoil characters' future or nature. Moreover, while names having "good and honorable" meanings are common in reality and won't cause significant effect, things are different with "...


1

The Lord of the Rings has a king called Theoden (which means "king"), Harry Potter has the werewolf Remus Lupin (named after Remus, brother of Romulus who was suckled by a wolf, and whose surname means wolf-like), and Snow Crash even got away with naming its main character Hero Protagonist If the story's good people generally won't be bothered by ...


3

I literally just registered here in order to say that. I have randomly stumbled across your question, and I am neither an author nor frequent reader, but reading about your name choices I was thinking: Gosh, this is brilliant! I wish I was reading the book and notice that naming thing. So go for it and be unique :) PS: Have no ability to comment, so sorry ...


9

Why Not? Personally, I LOVE making things in my writing with double meaning, loading with foreshadowing, and integrating mythic significance. I'm not the only one. Your readers will either NOT notice, in which case they don't care either way, or they WILL notice, and likely feel clever at being such keen observers. Now don't go and make things TOO obvious - '...


2

You are free to change a story's POV through the story. You can see this technique used in many novels that contain multiple plots and subplots. Dune, Game of Thrones, Count of Monte Cristo, and many more novels to name change the POV in between chapters. It is an effective technique to build tension and sustain suspense since it can lead to engaging cliff ...


2

I think it is a nice thing that you are doing. In order to make it a better novel, you need to introduce a bit of "challenge" to the reader. There must be something that the reader can learn from it as well (apart from being a good read). And to make it bit more complex, you can consider the following: Create a few twists even if the story is ...


2

Why are people reading your book? To get into a good story with interesting characters doing interesting things? Or trudge through a load of 'why bother' facts. Even a first page of data-dump is too much. Suppose tomorrow is the big battle then you (your characters) need to be focussed on that. The enemy are THE ENEMY BASTARDS with some weaknesses ...


3

Never, ever, try to make your text more difficult to read. Try to write interesting, captivating, nuanced, many layered literature that contains as many meaningful cultural references, themes, allusions to philosophical questions as you can reasonably fit. Then if a nine year old can still effortlessly enjoy it, you did a great job. 'easy' is sometimes used ...


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