New answers tagged

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Instead of looking at this as an arbitrary hoop to jump through, consider the reasons behind it. Publishers are looking for books with LBGTQ+ characters because book buyers are seeking those out. Why? Either because they are LBGTQ+ themselves and would like to see their own experience reflected, or because they want fictional worlds that better reflect the ...


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As far as I know, there is no legal requirement to include LGBT characters in YA novels in the USA. And in a few countries there might be official censorship decreeing that no LGBT characters appear in YA novels. Anyway, stories vary greatly in how many characters they have and how much information about various characters is given. A story could involve a ...


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So far, no LGBT character has 'organically' come up in the story. Speaking as someone who is Bi and in a homosexual relationship, The above quote from you is all I care about. If, in the creative process, you come up with a cool character who fits your story and is fun to read... and happens to be gay... then by all means write about the character. If you'...


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Many authors write one book at a time. The advantage to this is finishing them. Many writers -- or would-be writers -- report trouble finishing because the new project always looks more charming, at least before you start writing on it. (The writers often speak of it in the past tense.) OTOH, some find that switching between projects helps keep them ...


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Two books or more projects may be a good idea. If you have a replenishing bank of ideas and a robot supply of stamia. Let start with the cons: You may crack under pressure Ideas for idea number one are going to expired soon if you don't come back to it. On page 10, you would likely lose interest. Inspiration is good but an overdose of it could get you ...


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The problem with this approach is that it confuses the reader. The genre label is a signal to the reader that this story is one of those type of stories. A reader who is looking for a comfortable reading experience picks a story labeled as a mystery in the expectation that it contains all of the elements of a mystery. There may be some other elements but ...


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As far as I'm concerned, "too short" simply doesn't exist. The amount of words in a chapter don't matter, as long as your ability makes up for it. Author William Faulkner made a novel by the title As I Lay Dying. In this book, there is a chapter which I have memorized. I will now repeat it to you... "My mother is a fish." That's it. The ...


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To be honest, it's all up to you. How many books do you think you can handle writing at a time? Figure that out and try it, and if it doesn't work out than you can just try less, continue doing that until you find an amount that's easily manageable for you. However, you asked a question, so I'll answer it. I know I hate it when people don't answer my ...


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R. A. Freeman invented the "Inverted" detective story, in which the reader is first shown the crime in detail, and then sees how the detective solves it. In most cases the first section is told from the criminal's PoV, and the 2nd from the detective's or an associate of the detectives (the Dr Watson role). But in some cases, the first section was ...


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As the author of the story, with absolute freedom to tell your story anyway you want, you can use any POV you want in any scene you want. So yes, you can use an Omniscient POV for the prologue and 3rd person limited in the scenes of your chapters. I am told that 3rd Person limited is the most common POV used for writing these days because it is the easiest ...


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K. M. Weiland offers a nice short (and inexpensive) book on outlining your novel: Outlining Your Novel: Map Your way To Success available as kindle book at amazon. I to have provided a few steps that help you create a loose outline (based upon breaking your novel or story into scenes. I wrote it up here on writing SE : Basics in the world building of a ...


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Generally I tend to focus on "What is the point" when I get to the plot outline, with the overall plot of the book being the fist big point I need to find out. At the end of Climax, where are we and why? What needs to be seen in the final fight is important because it will build up all your other scenes. From there, it's a matter of tying in the ...


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To write my first books using these kinds of toys, I actually purchased a couple of kinds of floggers and tried using them on myself. I know it's not a whip or a perfect situation, but just like the towel analogy, it depends on position, distance, and how hard you can bring it down to where you're aiming. FYI, every flogger I tried was totally different from ...


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