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I have had a book blocked by KDP. It consisted of a number of images of a nude man, not particularly sexual, but many close-ups of his penis. The form letter said the company had concerns about porn and/or copyright. I could not figure whether it was either or both of these. Amazon sells books that are highly sexual, but I assume that is a separate matter ...


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It's certainly possible to write children's books of any length. However, all other things being equal, publishers tend to prefer shorter books, because they are cheaper to print. Clearly, however, a book can't be too short, or the reader will feel cheated. For an adult audience, the minimum length of a novel starts around 55k words, so something in the 65-...


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If you're part of the community, you could think back to how you felt when you were finding out and how you accepted yourself. If you're not, then you could talk to folks you know who are - particularly those who have had a hard time accepting themselves. Honestly, for me, I can barely remember when I was realizing. I just got a crush on a girl in 7th grade, ...


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Children's books can be a bit longer than that as long as they don't get too adult. Harry Potter started out for children and became young adults, but before it made the jump from "children" to "YA," some of the books were more lengthy. If you don't want/see that happening you need to keep the theme appropriate for children. You can ...


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There is no right answer. You can do something as short as 100 pages if you want, or go beyond 300 pages. There's the Percy Jackson series(plus all the other series in the same universe) that are about 200-300 pages each. There's the Harry Potter series which get longer the farther along in the series you get. There's shorter stories that hover around 100 ...


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It's not too long if it's good enough. I had a look on my shelf and I can see a couple of the Skullduggery Pleasant series that are long. The last of the Raven's Gate series is seriously long. However, I think you might be able to cut some of the words. Start with description. If you have any paragraphs of just description, consider cutting them down to a ...


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Make a list of all the possibilities you can think of. How have you seen secrets being revealed in books, movies, or real life? This could be anything ranging from one of the characters confiding in a friend (and misjudging the friend's ability to keep it to themselves) to the couple being literally caught in the act. At this point, it doesn't matter how ...


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Make it Painful and awkward: Cheesy and out-of-place is stock for nice outcomes and happy endings. So if the new relationship is disruptive to a friendship and incredibly painful, then make it so. Reality is messy, complex, and painful. Explore the harm and damage involved in the relationship. Anyone and everyone can potentially be hurt. It's a love triangle ...


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In your example: Her dictionary said that tukio meant 'was'. The word "tukio" needs to be in the same quotation marks as the word "was" is set in, such that: Her dictionary said that 'tukio' meant 'was'. Judging by your use of Punctuation, I'm going to guess you are using a British English writing guide as opposed to a North American ...


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You can just use regular quotation marks. Single quotes is not invalid, per se, but it's not standard in a context where you're using double quotes for quotations elsewhere.


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Absolutely! Many authors have already done it before. I think that writing your memoir as a novel makes it more engaging. Many authors have already done it before, such as the book "Educated by Tara Westover.


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What you are writing is described as an autobiographical novel. There have been many, so they are indeed all right.


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Journeying is a central part of my novel. A good, traditional theme from the Odyssey to Tolkein. However, it gets really boring really quickly to describe them walking through the same landscape for a few weeks. Well, then your job is to make it interesting. There's an entire genre devoted to making travel interesting: nonfiction travel writing. Travel is ...


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In addition to summarising the entire journey (examples provided in @Ceramicmrno0b's answer), you could also include several smaller time skips connected by significant events described in more detail. You'd summarise the first leg of the journey, then, for example, describe the scene of how they almost got spotted by scouts and little Timmy, previously seen ...


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Just say that they walked for two weeks, but throw in a few interesting tidbits about the journey. The longer the journey, the more details you add. Don't just write; "Alright, to mount death we go!" I said. We walked for two weeks, arriving breathless from the travel, blahblahblah... Write something along the lines of; "Alright, to mount ...


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Depends on the writer and the reader. I, for once, have dropped many novels who have little dialogue. I love an intense plot, with danger lurking every corner and the stakes being high. But this all the time is tiring. I also love to see banters, characters sharing their view of life, and conflicting with others about it, developing their relationships among ...


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It sounds like your first, main question is establishing a unique voice for your narrator, so I'll focus on that in the interest of brevity. There are a lot of great examples of books that have quirky, unique and even unreliable narrators, or simply narrators with unusual voices and limited perspectives. Here are a few ways to give your narrator an ...


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This question has some good answer that might help. Anyway, my suggestion for making your characters unique is to write down their personalities, take a look at the situation, and then just role play. Whatever you/the character does, write it down. Might require some imagination, but if you've written a book already then you've got that covered. This should ...


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It depends on your writing style. Assuming you are writing with a character's voice (the narrator voice is filtered through the viewpoint of your protagonist as opposed to being separate) then you would want to use your character's observations, thoughts, etc. to set up and accomplish this. Examples: My voice seems to echo, and I realize that as I speak one ...


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I don't see why you can't do this. There is no rule saying you can't. It's all about execution, really. How well you pull it off. These things can be jarring to the reader if not done correctly. Basically, any time you change a primary element of your writing style, you need to be careful. But again, there is nothing that says you CAN'T do it at all. It's ...


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There's no reason you can't do this. I have an (unpublished) essay that follows a similar format which garnered a number of personalized rejections and the only comments on mixing first/third person were positive. As with anything artistic, the key question is how well you manage the execution.


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Maybe The Snowflake Method It sells itself as between full outline and pantsing writing, and I mean that literally. The author has multiple books showing you how to use his method. The idea is you start with a one-sentence summary and then build that to a paragraph, then a full page, and so on. Every step of the way you can change and discard stuff that ...


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