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If you know your character well, list the things that the character wants and needs. Then devise situations in which you as the author prevent the character from getting those things, at least in the short term. For example: Jody wants to be King. But Sam wants to be King as well. There can only be one King. Jody needs to be noble and to play by the rules. ...


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One method is: Start with the world. What world/setting is in your mind? Next ask, "In this world, what does the villain want? Why is he doing what he's doing?" You can follow this up by asking "What obstacles would the villain place on the hero, to prevent the hero from stopping him?" That might give you a vision for a plot. Hope this helps. I ...


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If your characters are good, you might not even need to develop a plot. But you do need to know your characters very well and have good imagination. Have you listened to children making up stories? They don't have a plot, but they do have some well-defined protagonists (a princess, a knight, a superhero, a supervillain etc.) and a world where this story is ...


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Judging by your link, what you're going for seems like a first-person, past-tense account of events that transitions into third-person accounts, but never quite closes in on such a deep-point perspective as to show us anyone's thoughts. We're often told of what characters are thinking in the moment, but these descriptions are confided to us in third person, ...


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It sounds like what you are looking for is "Close 3rd Person POV", which is where you narrate as though you were hovering over the main character's shoulder. In Close 3rd Person, you have access to the main character's thoughts and viewpoint, but you don't write in their voice, outside of dialog. You're allowed to use the main character's private names for ...


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This particular example is easy. The plot was apparently reviewed only from one viewpoint - the plot itself. Reviewing it from characters' viewpoints would immediately detect the inconsistency. The leader would never reacted that way (unless he wanted to teach a lesson in humility). In short - develop your characters, and stay true to them.


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It depends on the point of view of your story. 1st person - For example, if your story is narrated from Person A or Person B, then you can tell the reader all the intimate details as long as THAT PERSON knows them themselves. 3rd person limited - It sounds like, since your narrator doesn't know A and B's intimate details, your story is probably narrated in ...


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