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1

Your book is about coming of age. You can have all of that, but then everything needs to serve the coming of age. The love triangle needs to be about how your character is developing into who he will be/needs to be. The opening needs to present the challenge that he must overcome. If it's action/adventure, fine, but it's got to ultimately show where he's ...


4

Find a underlying theme Just because your sections have different tones and plots doesn't mean that they have to be entirely unconnected. You say that the book is a coming of age story - what are the specific elements of coming of age that the character(s) are learning to deal with? Is it about becoming the master of your own fate? Learning to take ...


0

I tend to write my novels as way more episodic than this (to the point that they are episodic short stories with connected characters... and the antagonist of the final couple of chapters is nominally present in chapters where they aren't the villain of that chapter). There are some books that are even less connected than that, such as the Encyclopedia ...


-3

I think it is totally fine. World War Z was kind of written that way, if i remember correctly. It isn't a very good book... BUT some of the episodes are mildly entertaining social commentaries.


0

Most attempts at classifying things like this are completely arbitrary. Different writers will come up with different lists, and it's not like you could somehow prove that one is right and the others are wrong. This reminds me ... nothing about writing, but about classifying. A friend of mine who had not gone to college as a young person decided to go when ...


12

Do you want the most stories, or the least stories? The ad infinitum of plot lists is probably the book Plotto: The Master Book of All Plots by William Wallace Cook. It's a manic collection of (often bizarre) story vignettes, with an algebraic formula for how to string them together. It claims to offer over 2000 plot conflicts, based on his organizing ...


-3

Riches to Rags. Typically this is a western song though. A series of events. See Tom Sawyer. There's no real progression until the Deus Ex Machina of all that gold in the end, and Huck doesn't even like the result.


32

The archetypes are a descriptive framework created by scholars in order to describe stories. Someone had a theory, says every story fits into one of those archetypes. Any story you give them, they will fit it into one of those archetypes, even if it squeaks a little. For my part, there are stories I struggle to fit into this framework. The Jungle Book, for ...


59

No, they are not all of them. This is a common game, there are many books claiming there are 3 plots, 7 plots, 12 plots, 21 plots, 23 plots, whatever. You could say there is only one plot: Character Has A Problem. Overcoming the Monster. The monster is the problem. Rags to Riches. Poverty, disrespect, deprivation is the problem. The Quest. Finding the ...


0

This might not be quite what you are looking for, but it may give you an idea. In one of Higashino's novels, Malice, it becomes clear that the first person narrator is lying to the Reader, who naturally wonders why? (He is also lying to the Police). Maybe you could find a way to use your impossibilities as a plot device. (Actually The Matrix does this).


0

You can always take a middle way, by discussing the issue in the story. So, your hero gets trashed but miraculously survives. Have a doctor discuss it. "Seriously, Mr. Smith, I've never heard of anybody with your injuries living. I have no idea why you are not down in the morgue right now."


9

Never let the truth get in the way of a good story. (Mark Twain, allegedly) If your licence (or licences) from the truth really troubles your conscience, leave your explanation/justification for a note at the end of the novel. This way you won't break the flow for the reader, and you'll leave your explanation for a time (at the end of the novel) when the ...


4

This happened to me earlier while I was writing fan fiction - given the informal nature of it, I simply let my character survive a wound that he shouldn't have survived If this impossible thing is not critical to the story, you might be writing yourself out of a corner with magic. This can yank the reader out of their immersion, and demonstrates that ...


2

One classic approach is to “hang a lampshade on it.” If he really shouldn’t have survived that, you can have a character in the story point out how lucky he is. It calls attention to the fact that the plot is implausible (although this is could be a clue that there’s really more going on). But at minimum, it tells the reader you’re aware of it. John Bois’...


4

One of the best examples I can think of--where the plot requires a counter-factual setting--is the beginning of Never Let Me Go. It simply states the assumptions the reader needs to accept: "The breakthrough in medical science came in 1952. Doctors could now cure the previously incurable. By 1967, life expectancy passed 100 years." By stating the "...


14

A really good example of this is The Martian, where the key event for Watney being stranded on Mars is a violent storm which damages equipment, injures Watney and threatens the lander. Andy Weir was perfectly aware that Mars does not in fact have winds which would match the novel's events - whilst winds on Mars can be extremely fast, the thin atmosphere ...


5

Every book is going to play around with reality to some degree, though some do it more than others. Every case is different. Is this a story that would end up on a "I can't believe they survived!" style TV show? In my own book, I've included one of my favorite songs. But the song didn't exist in that time period. It's in Aramaic and Aramaic and Hebrew ...


32

Sometimes writers make mistakes. Sometimes they didn't know something. Sometimes they chose to ignore a fact because it got in the way of their story. This is so common, TV tropes has a whole family of tropes related to the phenomenon. Of particular interest to you would be Artistic License - Medicine with all its subtropes, and Critical Research Failure. ...


16

"I simply let my character survive a wound that he shouldn't have survived" Real people do this all the time, one of my favourites was a guy in Alaska who accidentally severed his own jugular vein with a chainsaw and then proceeded to walk 20 odd miles to the nearest town for help. He should have been unconscious almost instantly and died a few moments ...


73

I simply let my character survive a wound that he shouldn't have survived, and then left a note at the bottom about what would have really happened. As a reader, this would break my immersion and ruin the story, everything after that is BS, I know it, the author knows it, and did it anyway. Change the plot point. Change the injury to something crippling ...


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