6

A villain doesn't have to be physically present to be "present" in the story. From the sound of it you introduce the villain pretty early on by reputation, and spend most of the story working up to actually meeting/confronting them. There's nothing wrong with that. This happens in a lot of stories. If your story has pacing issues, then it could ...


2

I don't see why you can't do this. There is no rule saying you can't. It's all about execution, really. How well you pull it off. These things can be jarring to the reader if not done correctly. Basically, any time you change a primary element of your writing style, you need to be careful. But again, there is nothing that says you CAN'T do it at all. It's ...


2

I've never been in a sandstorm either, so I don't know exactly how it feels or what all the risks of being stuck in one are, but people do generally seem to want to avoid them. Do a bit more research and see what else you find out about sandstorms. That said, you do have some options here that come to mind off the top of my head: Option 1: The risk of ...


2

I would take a cliffhanger approach where the suspense is built up in the back half of the chapter/entry so that the first sentance of the next chapter does pay off, and you can organically lead with the big part. For example if Brutus was writing a diary during this time, the entry Dated "14th of March" would be about the big decision he has to ...


2

One approach would be to use information the diary author knows, but the reader doesn't: Yes!! Oh my gosh it's YES!! and then just carry on with the reaction or whatever but omitting all the details of what exactly this person has won/earned/been awarded or whatever until you feel like revealing it. Another would be to start with a lede that reveals only ...


1

While I've never been in a proper sandstorm, I have been on a beach during high winds produced by a nearby Hurricane (it had missed us and gone north, but the winds were still quite strong.). The wind was nothing that could be dangerous to large objects, but it did wip up the sand on the beach surface, which had a mild stinging feeling against exposed skin. ...


1

There's no reason you can't do this. I have an (unpublished) essay that follows a similar format which garnered a number of personalized rejections and the only comments on mixing first/third person were positive. As with anything artistic, the key question is how well you manage the execution.


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