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1

This is more of a comment than an answer, but it is long, so I posted it here. I find the subject interesting and I am sure someone will come up with an answer, if there is one it will likely be in psycho-linguistics. When I was in high school, in France, we studied something similar. It was not a science, or a precise field, just a matter of word ...


1

Number one question: Why does your character have 3 names? This is inherently confusing. You're going to have some number of readers wondering, "Wait, you said just Dre and Nezbit were in the room. Who is this Andreas person? Where did he come from?" etc. Remember, you're dedicating months, maybe years of your life to writing this story. You are ...


1

Not necessarily a recommendation for you, but a clever idea Anthony Trollope could get away with. His barrister is Mr Chaffanbrass. His generic farmer is Greenacres. The classy London doctor is Sir Omicron Pie. His rival potential prime ministers are Mr Brock (e.g. badger) and Lord de Terrier.


9

In my opinion, there are three types of side characters: 'Throwaway characters.' These are the random people- shopkeepers, guards and innocent bystanders. They don't always need a name, but if they do have one, either (depending on the complexity of your worldbuilding) give them a name related to their place of origin, or just go on a random generator ...


1

For side characters I try to get along with a common name or without a name; sometimes people can be referenced by their profession only, sometimes by a feature or habit. Example: There is "the bird-watcher" who can be seen every day in a park and who has witnessed something. Later in the story, they can be referenced again as the bird-watcher ...


3

To me it depends on how important I think this side character would be. If it's a shop owner, worker, a throw away character for a one line in a battle, or the human roadblock stopping my character for that scene I may not give them a full name but a generic first name for the region my characters are in. My regions are loosely based off of actual countries ...


4

I recommend a book or a website designed for naming a baby. I have found them very useful, especially for minor characters.


5

My experience has been to concentrate on the story - first and foremost. That is what drives the success or failure of any kind of fiction. So, as you create each new character, if a name fails to materialize immediately, you might try labeling the first unnamed character as "AAA," the second as "BBB," and so on. This will temporarily ...


0

I feel drop hints, like when you write a scene imagine how both characters will act and make note of the difference between them. If for example a character switches part way then show a distinct difference based on their personalities. As you said Suoti is a gaming personality so I am assuming they are more of the teasing type I would say not have Niar/...


0

You could imply that some of her appearance changes; for example: "My name is Eben - who are you?" Inquired the older man. A mystic gloom surrounded Nair. Her smile was vicious, and her eyes became serious. "I am Suoti." You could also imply a change of scenery, like: The light dimmed, and a mystical aurora gleamed from Niar. "I'm ...


0

I'm writing a similar story, and I deal with it by giving the two personalities the same last name. When transitioning, it's always "Ms. Smith."


2

Write the switch-over, and then refer to the individual by the name of the active personality. That, or assign a group noun that all the personalities will respond to (e.g. if they treat each other as sisters, then the surname may be a common factor, "Miss Watevachezcauwd") If this is a Third Person narrative (either omniscient or limited but with ...


2

I would write... "My name is Eben - who are you?" inquired the old man. "I'm Suoti," the younger girl replied. You can dodge the question of identity by referring to the body's physical characteristics until it's apparent that the one body hosts multiple personalities.


3

Think first about the country you want your city to be in. Then find out who the first people were that discovered your country. Let's say you want to name a city in Britain. The first people there were the Romans. Think about what the Romans could find special in your city. Maybe there were, I don't know, many bears as they arrived. So you take the Latin ...


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