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37

The reason for Acme's use is two fold: First the name has a meaning of "peak or pinnacle of achievement" which is good for any standard, but also happens to be perfect for the obsolete search algorithm of "phone books." Back in the day before the internet was accessible to the general public on their phones, the phone book (...


21

Sure! There's always one. This site is a great list, but here are a few: Umbrella Corporation (Resident Evil) Innovative Online Industries (Ready Player One) Wayne Industries (DC) Oscorp, Stark Industries (Marvel) Union Aerospace Corporation [UAC] (Doom) Spaceley's Sprockets/Cogswell's Cogs (The Jetsons) Cyberdyne Systems Corporation (The Terminator) Zorin ...


20

Since you haven't actually sent the book to anybody, you can change the names all you want and nobody will know. I'd say sure, go ahead and change it. If you are still on the fence, you can ask the betas (that's the great thing about betas; they're there to help). Tell them, 'I got these two names I'm not entirely set on. Do you think they're fine or should ...


17

James Bond is a big fan of Universal Exports. First used in Fleming’s novels, Universal Exports operates as the cover for MI6. M is referred to as the “managing director” and Bond is a field agent. Although Fleming changed Universal Exports to “Transworld Consortium” in his novel The Man With The Golden Gun, this change was never reflected on in the films. ...


14

I know you said this is based on an ancient Roman custom, but the way you describe it - a longer name used in formal settings and a shorter version used among friends and family - makes it sound like "Odaenathus" is his real name and "Odainat" is a nickname. This, to me, feels similar to how a character in a modern novel might be called &...


13

While I imagine it might be annoying to the reader, maybe readers will get used to these names and simply skip over them. The best way to check this would be to write some kind of dialogue (or copy an existing one and replace the names) and ask your beta readers. In any case, I'd advise you to make sure that each name has a distinctive beginning and ending, ...


13

My own preference is TLC -- which stands for Three Letter Corporation (not to be confused with TLA, Three Letter Agency, which is a super-secret government operation).


12

Given that most characters in the Lord of the Rings books have at least two names, and that it is successful, I would see no problem. Keep the use of each name local to the appropriate scene. And, drop in the occasional reminder to the reader that the character has two names. Indeed, in your case where the names are simply cultural variants, it should be ...


9

I think it’s fine. It doesn’t sound like your character has two names, more like two titles. And that’s normal for everyone if you take the time to think about it. For example, say you run a company and have a family. You would be called “Boss” by your employees, “Mr./Mrs. _______” by your partners and colleagues, “first name” by your husband or wife and ...


9

Why Not? Personally, I LOVE making things in my writing with double meaning, loading with foreshadowing, and integrating mythic significance. I'm not the only one. Your readers will either NOT notice, in which case they don't care either way, or they WILL notice, and likely feel clever at being such keen observers. Now don't go and make things TOO obvious - '...


9

One take I've seen on this is to use a well known company and then make a pun and go from there. For instance, in William Hertling's sci-fi series about a Google-like company who inadvertently creates an AI from a simple e-mail autocomplete system, he started with Google's name. Google, from Googol in math, meaning a really big number (10100). So in his ...


8

Pet Names/Convenient Initials: The MC can have pet names for everyone, and in third person everyone is called the pet name. But when someone is formally addressed, it's by their full name. So Alejandro Llewelyn Ignacio-Schmitt becomes "Ali" in the MC's head. Or a girl looks feline, so she's "Cat," but when the MC speaks they say "So ...


7

Once it's been through copyediting before publication you shouldn't change character names. Until then, you can change names any time you like. I would say that readers will be much happier if they don't have to deal with too-similar sounding names.


6

In my opinion, the best way to cement two names together in a reader's mind is to have the narrative describe him one way while a character describes him another way. "Is that you, Odainat?" "Yes," Odaenathus said. Obviously, make it less forced than that, but the important thing is to tie the names together in the same passage.


6

This works more than fine. Russian novels frequently refer to characters by various different names -- for example, in "Crime and Punishment", one of the central character's full name is Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikov. Depending on the context, and who is speaking to her, she is alternatingly called Avdotya, Dunya, Dunechka, Avdotya Romanovna, or by ...


6

Since the word acme means the best, but is kind of dated. You can get the same effect as Acme Co. With a more modern, word for the best. Like Pinnacle Corp. Or Peak Technologies. Or Zenith (a real company that made televisions that is out of business.)


6

A lot of the existing answers suggest names I've never heard of before, and I think you'll have that issue with any audience. There will be a subset that gets it, but a decent amount who aren't "in" on the reference. What I suggest is to use a name that's not a pop culture reference, but rather that the generic-ness is implied in the name itself. ...


5

he is called "Odainat" by most including his wife, but on official Roman business he uses the name "Odaenathus." Mention it the first time that Roman officials converse with him. "Hail, Odaenathus! How fare thee? some polite small talk The locals call you Odainat, I hear. Is that true?"


5

If you have yet to send it to anyone, there’s no reason you shouldn’t change the names. Possibly ask your beta readers for an opinion if you can’t decide, but it’s ultimately up to you. However, I would question your supposition that the names Zeidric and Xandria are too close for two reasons: Phonetics of names don’t matter much in written form, and novels ...


5

You can make your own. Just take a word related to what the fictional company does and attach "-dyne" to the end. You automatically have a company name that sounds modern and on the bleeding edge of their industry. We see this is existing fiction already with names like Cyberdyne and Yoyodyne. You don't even need to ask what they do, the name tells ...


5

The current trend in fiction is to depict parodies of specific existing companies and products (with parodies of Walmart being the Walmart of such parodies, I suppose). This is done by changing a letter or series of letters in the name (thus sidestepping a lot of potential trademark issues): McDonald's becomes WcDonald's Instagram becomes Outstagram Google ...


5

No, But Be Careful When Using Invocation: I can't really dispute Sciborg's answer, but I do think it deserves an addendum. The use of German or Latin place names, characters, etc. can be completely coincidental, OR it can be used intentionally to create color for your setting. Using names of a places and people from a certain culture tends to evoke thoughts ...


4

Realism is just a style, and accuracy is just a technique --meaning, you should do what best serves your story. There are historical pieces --the current Hulu series The Great is a prime example, and the classic fantasy novel The Once and Future King is another --that are presented in a contemporary style, and where the illusion of historical accuracy is not ...


4

This answer on a Worldbuilding sub might help: https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/62648/why-would-a-city-not-use-names/62661#62661 In it, I talk about titles and positions in societies. While this is, in fact, the exact opposite of what you are doing, the answer might be contained within. Just ask the question: are the relationships BETWEEN ...


4

It would be a society where talking is simply allowed to take longer than with shorter names. Still, people would get used to rattle down the names - much like Finnish rattle down the digits of numbers. (A very instructive example is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuNs1v_jtfs, which demonstrates all numbers between 1 and 100; the start is very slow so you ...


4

It's quite possible that there are other "generic" names out there that would apply to any industry. But for airlines, the go-to is Oceanic There are occasionally cases where companies take names from pop-culture references (like Brawndo), but Oceanic is fairly safe as if it were a real airline, it would have to overcome their horrific safety ...


4

I'd recommend using preexisting names for a few reasons. Reason 1- you need less explanation of the creature, as people will probably already know what it means. For example, most people have heard of a Pegasus being a bird horse, and so you don't have to explain in detail the Pegasus because they already know the bulk of what it looks like, all you have to ...


4

Avoiding Hot Water: Sonic and Taco John's are actually more wide-spread, but I get the point. People in the region are likely to get oblique references (Mount Rose MN vs. Rosemount MN in the movie Drop Dead Gorgeous) while people outside the area are unlikely to get the reference at all unless they Google it (if you saw the movie, did you know there was a ...


4

No. As with most things when it comes to writing, you are the author, and you can make whatever worldbuilding decisions you want without having to justify all of them. If your characters all have traditionally German and Latin names, then that's what they have. If they have Asian, African or French names, that's what they have. That's all there is to it. ...


3

I literally just registered here in order to say that. I have randomly stumbled across your question, and I am neither an author nor frequent reader, but reading about your name choices I was thinking: Gosh, this is brilliant! I wish I was reading the book and notice that naming thing. So go for it and be unique :) PS: Have no ability to comment, so sorry ...


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