New answers tagged

3

I'd say, make sure her central dilemma is NOT exactly about where her brother is, but about what her brother does for her. A good analogy would be Dorothy in the movie The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. She seeks the Wizard, to get her home, and goes through all sorts of trials and meets her friends, but in the end the Wizard is a bust, a fraud. Not what they ...


4

I think the bigger problem with your story is that it sets the wrong reader expectations. Readers come into the story not having any idea what will be payed off, except maybe some hopes of what the story will be about based on your title, cover art, and synopsis. They can only go off of what you give them. The things you put in the opening chapter, the ...


8

You need to distinguish between payoff for the character and payoff for the reader. The character may or may not get the payoff she wants --your contract isn't with the characters, but with the readers, they are the ones you owe the payoff to. Throughout your story, and especially at the beginning, you as the writer are making a host of promises to the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included