Hot answers tagged

40

Is there a practical, effective way to prevent this IP theft? Yes. As someone who has pirated countless books, I might give you some insight into my frame of mind. There's a very simple way you can counteract this "theft": Put a donation link on your website. You'd be surprised if I told you how many times I wanted to donate to an author after reading ...


18

Writing is mostly a long-term profession. For most professional writers, writing is a long-term prospect. You are unlikely to make much money from one book, or five. Of course, unlikely is not the same as impossible. What makes a professional career work: A reader reads one of your books, enjoys it, searches for another one, and finds one. So to make a ...


18

There is probably no stopping of file sharing in the modern world. But there is a chance we can make it cool to be backer and investor, sponsor and patron. Patreon, flattr, kickstarter, indiegogo and many other sites and services exist at this point and then I haven't even searched particularly notoriously after them the last year or so. There is a ...


12

My advice is to ignore the people that advocate writing a book in one month, or two, or three. Even with no other duties, it takes me at least six months to finish my fifth draft of a book, and I may spend another three months doing more drafts. I don't expect anybody else to follow my formula, it is based on my personal sensibilities and what I have found ...


11

INT. STARBUCKS, LOS ANGELES People are sitting at tables and on couches, some on smartphones, many typing away on laptops. We pan to a man in his 40's, with a ponytail and reading glasses. He is concentrating fiercely, reading something on a Macbook. JOE (looks up at camera): Oh, hello there! I didn't see you. Welcome to Screenwriter's Corner. Today we ...


10

They do not quit their day job. That's true for many other writers, too. But besides that, yes, they get paid for unused scripts if these scripts were optioned. I. e. a producer pays them money for the exclusive right to the script for a certain amount of time. During that time the producer can think about turning it into a movie without fearing that a ...


10

If you want people to be honest, make it easy for them to do so. Eighteen years ago, there was a hugely popular computer program called "Napster". It let people share their music collections with each other in violation of all sorts of copyright laws. The music publishers were up in arms over this, and filed hundreds of thousands of lawsuits against ...


9

You've gotten plenty of negative answers here, which, I am sad to say, are accurate. The unfortunate truth is that writing is a horribly unrewarding profession. The fact of the matter is that, no matter how you slice it, most writers do not make enough money to support themselves from their writing. And when I say most writers, I mean literally ALMOST ALL ...


9

You sign a contract with the copyright owner. The contract specifies the arrangement. Permission to use the quote in your work. Permission to use the quote in derivative works (electronic, translations, movies, comics, etc). Payment. Rights/ownership (more relevant for pieces of work you use that have not yet been published, and for art). When there is a ...


8

Download a random ebook from Amazon, or read a random blog, and you will see that most writers are not ready for prime time. (In the old days, they got screened out by agents and publishers, so this wasn't so obvious.) It's not that most writers are awful (although some are), but they fall short in critical areas. Their writing is charming, but hokey. Or ...


8

The range is enormous, but the average income for published authors is spectacularly low—around $500 a year. No missing zero. Five hundred. The tiny minority who hit the bestseller lists will do quite well. Many novels sell movie rights. Most are never made into movies, but if you are lucky enough to see your book turned into a major movie, of course you ...


8

Almost certainly no. But the positive thing is: the answer was always “almost certainly no.” Most fiction writers in any era did not make any money. Even the greats often worked day jobs and still died young and penniless. And even when a short story or novel sold millions, the writer often got very little. Certainly not enough to get above minimum wage ...


8

I can't quite answer your point directly because I wouldn't dream of publishing without three rounds of edits: developmental, copy, and proof. But this is a personal preference and the answer depends very much on what you want from your book. Many writers self-edit and publish and there's nothing wrong with that. Finishing a book, even a bad one, is a ...


7

Those are basically two of the most common options, yes. Below are the ones that I know: Fee: This is typical for articles, short stories and poems submitted to magazines (when there is payment offered). You get either a one-time flat fee or a per-word fee for first publication rights in that periodical. Contract Writing: This is typical for large ...


6

As a blog author and publisher and open source programmer, I feel even more exposed to "IP theft". But "IP theft" does not exist for me when I write or publish program source codes, even though I earn good money with those. Why? I ditched that frightening term from my vocabulary. It does not contribute to anything, quite the opposite in fact. If carry ...


6

How can you be sure your employer is telling the truth when she says there's no money for bonuses this year? Or your local farmer's market farmer who says the early rain messed with the harvest and that's why the squash is twice the price it was last week? How can you be sure that a writer, famous for books about how authors should follow his advice to ...


5

It is sad but true that without strict enforcement of anti-piracy laws, and in the absence of broad cultural perceptions that consider the act of acquiring and reading a pirated ebook as either criminal or unethical (and I am talking society and culture here, not intellectual property laws or their enforcement) any reader who can get an ebook free is ...


4

Short answer: No. There are, of course, some people who become millionaires from their writing: JK Rowling, Stephen King, etc. But the vast majority of writers do not make anywhere near what you could make by devoting the same amount of energy to something really lucrative, like, say, flipping burgers at a fast-food place. If your goal is to make money, ...


4

First, I am not a business lawyer, or tax attorney. The following are my understandings from being in business, do not rely on this as legal advice, and you should consult with a business lawyer or tax attorney in your jurisdiction. As a general rule, No, my understanding is that writers do not need a business account, or ANY account, for that matter. I ...


3

The Kindle Direct Publishing contract says that you will not make your book available elsewhere for a lower price. So if your book is available on a web site for free, you can't sell it for more than $0.00 on Amazon. If they find your book available at a lower price, they will drop the Kindle price to match it. And they will scold you. I don't know whether ...


3

1) Try to find something that requires lots of time but little hands-on time, like house-sitting, pet-sitting, old-people-sitting, and infant-sitting. (But NOT child-sitting!) Or night watchman. The pay will be lousy (minimum wage or less), but you'll have lots of free time doing it, so you can do it a lot. You can work 12 hours a day at jobs like that, ...


3

Traditional publishing pays the author about $1 per hardback and $.50 on each paperback sale. Midlist authors usually get advances in the $10,000 range for a first run hardback. With the goal to make back their advance on the first year of sales. And then to switch to a paperback that gives them royalties that decline every year thereafter. If a book goes ...


3

It's unclear if these books are ebook only, print only or both. If it's an ebook, then that's not a bad deal at all (especially if you are interested in the topic). The 600 is basically an advance. You said "recoup." I understand that to mean that if revenues exceed 600, then you are entitled to 25% of earnings. With ebooks, very few people are being ...


3

Normally the royalty rate you find online are calculated on the cover price, so 40% is very high. The "reasonable range" is more line 10-25% with 15% being the most common. (25% for ebook, where there are no printing cost) But the single number is not really important: the rate you are asking could not (and normally is not) be a fixed number: often royalty ...


3

One way to build your "list" is to contribute shorter works to anthologies -- someone may buy(borrow) the book because of interest in the topic/prompt OR because they know one writer in it (Peter Beagle did a story here? I need it). Many readers will read the whole book (or at least start each story to give it a chance to grab them), and while you may be ...


3

individual issues 50¢ eBook ~ $2 printed book in stores ~ $5 direct sale ~ $7+ I'm not sure how helpful this will be, but starting with observations. Your marketing should focus on the one type of sale you can control: direct to buyer. This is your "luxury" or "gift" market. Try to think of ways to get people to buy a copy for their friend. Perks can ...


3

I hired an editor in my early days as a comic book scripter, and I think she was absolutely invaluable in helping me learn the basics of the form I was writing in. If you're breaking into the script world, or if you're self publishing, I highly recommend hiring an editor. However, I have also hired editors who didn't do me much good at all, and wasted ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible