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6

Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


6

From the MLA Handbook, 8th ed., p. 55: There are circumstances in which a citation like "(Baron 194)" doesn't provide enough information to lead ambiguously to a specific entry. If you borrow from works by more than one author with the same last name (e.g., Naomi Baron and Sabrina Alcorn Baron), eliminate ambiguity in the citation by adding the authors's ...


4

When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that "[r]...


4

In MLA citation, the author is put before the website. Lastname, Firstname. "Title." Website Title (Italics). Publisher, Date Month Year of publication. Web. Date month year of access. If there is no author, just omit the author and begin the citation with "Title.


4

One website citing the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (New York: MLA, 1988) 46-47 says that you should use just the last name after the first time (with some exceptions): In general, the first time you use a person's name in the text of your paper, state it fully and accurately, exactly as it appears in your source. Arthur George ...


3

First of all, you may have to remove the dash before the word "Wind" in your second entry. As for the in-text citation, the first one will be cited as ("Alternative Energy," Discover) and the second as ("Alternative Energy," Wind). This issue has been addressed in MLA 7th edition, section 6.4.4 (Page number in my edition is 223).


3

Consider how your reader will use the book. In an academic work (which this is not), readers: are likely to already be familiar with the cited works (they're also researchers in this field, after all) will rely on the works you cite to evaluate your work (they care about those citations) read lots of such articles and welcome a consistent style (...


3

Cite the game according to your style guide's format, and provide any more specific context you feel is necessary as part of the lead-in and text surrounding the quote or reference. The Traveller's sudden incarceration on his first arrival in the 233rd Age parallels the Traveller's arrival in Riven: an automated trap is sprung and the Traveller forced to ...


3

Various style guides have recommendations for citing indirect sources. However it's important to keep in mind that your works cited page is a list of sources you personally have used during your research. Since that's the case, it's recommended (generally) that you don't use indirect sources, but that if you do chose to use indirect sources, you let the ...


3

As people said in the comments, double check with your teacher first - seeing as they're going to be the one grading you, I'd make sure whatever you do is okay with them. Now, if you are citing an article, inline citations (for a book or multiple page-long article) only need to have the author and page number, like in (Smith 290). If it's something with an ...


3

If the figure were in another published work, you would cite it the same way you would if it were somebody else's work. Citing yourself is done when applicable; that's not an error. You indicated in a comment, however, that you drew the figure for the purpose of the present work. In that case, you just include it as part of the work. Citations are for ...


3

I am a PhD and former professor. The purpose of the citation is to allow the reader to access the source material and read it for themselves. I have noticed some academic papers cite blogs and even anonymous authors. I don't know of a style guide that includes Internet sources. Most publisher's of academic articles have their own style guides. SO, if the ...


3

It is actually relatively simple. This information is taken from Purdue OWL (a really great website for MLA problems). To cite multiple sources in the same parenthetical reference, separate the citations by a semi-colon: . . . as has been discussed elsewhere (Burke 3; Dewey 21). You stick all your citations between two parentheses and separate them by ...


3

The MLA Handbook (8th ed.) does not mention the use of citations within introductory text at all. Barring their proscription, I can only assume that the rules for such in introductions are the same as for anywhere else in the body of a piece of text. Unless a publisher says not to do it because of their own house style, I see no reason why you shouldn't.


3

The answer is two fold: Ask your teacher. Google it. I can't ask your teacher for you, but I did a quick Google search. Since you added the mla tag, I assume that's the format required. So here's the official word: Citing non-print or sources from the Internet With more and more scholarly work being posted on the Internet, you may have to cite ...


2

This (pdf guide by Austin Peay State University) states the following about citing the same source multiple time in the same paragraph: When citing a source the first time, use the author’s name(s) unless the name is used as part of the sentence that introduces the source’s text. Example: The expert of writing claims, “MLA Style of formatting is the easiest ...


2

I think that it shood be something like this: Paul Rosenburg Sally Seashell James Dickenbottham Peter Demento,Ph.D. PSYC-169 Intro to Wetness 31 December 2018


2

As far as I'm know, the MLA format is used to Cite essays, research papers, and other works in MLA Distinguish the works of the other authors Prepare a list of all cited sources (a.k.a. Bibliography or Works Cited in MLA) MLA is commonly met in publications related to humanities and some social sciences. I don't recall any restrictions about listing ...


2

It depends on what is in between quote x from Ferguson and y quote from Ferguson. If there is no quotes in between x and y then you can just refer the page number and if there is a quote in between you need to refer to the source again. Also, if there is no sentences between x and y you can just refer to the source after y. However, I personally tend to stay ...


2

First, note that as of MLA 8 there is a basic way to cite any source. It goes as follows: Author. Title of source. Title of container, Other contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Publication date, Location. If you can't find a way to cite a source, simply follow that basic outline. For info on it, check here. I managed to find the ...


2

Most Modern Christian works use footnotes except for scripture which is always cited inline. Early works which predate modern citation styles use the author's name or the common identifier for a work when an author was known for more than one work, as many works had no titles, page numbers or publishers in a narrative citation style (the citation, what there ...


2

From what I remember, the standard way to separate two citations like this would be to include the year in the citation. EG: "This is quote one" ("Alternative Energy" 2007), and "this is quote two" ("Alternative Energy" 2015). I cannot cite a source for this, though, as I have not used MLA in years and do not have a copy of the handbook available.


2

The following is quoted from Harvard Guide to Using Sources When you are citing an edition of a book other than the first edition, you should indicate the edition. In both MLA and APA styles, you should identify the edition you are citing by year or number (if either is available), or by name (if the edition is listed as "revised" or "abridged"). ...


2

If it's something that big I would blockquote it (as you've done here for your post) and indent it, and then leave off quotes. It's not dialogue, which has specific practices for multiple paragraphs in a row, and I'd be worried that my reader would forget that I'm quoting someone.


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