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3

Most answers say "it's not a good idea" and that's what I'm going to say as well, but offer an example. Besides commercial or professional work, I occasionally visit fan-fiction platforms as well. And there, serialising a full work like you are asking about doing is pretty standard - a precious few only start sharing after they are done with at least the ...


0

In the comics world, this is normal. Each issue (the standard is 22 pages, not including the cover and publisher additions) comes out separately, either as an e-comic or on paper, or both. After at least 4 issues, but generally a year's worth, which can be 4-12 issues, the comic is collected into a book. Usually these are volumes of a larger work, but it ...


3

I haven't heard of it. When you can get whole books for free, and many books for 99c, this seems an unlikely route to successful marketing. If any piecemeal approach has a chance of working, I'd suggest giving away 3 chapters for free, as a free sample of the writing quality, with a payment for the rest of the book. There are some authors using a scheme ...


4

Serializing a novel has been done before - traditionally this was done as part of periodic publications (so you would get say a chapter per issue of a magazine) but it has been done outside this environment as well. The only recent notable example that comes to mind is Stephen King's The Green Mile which was released in six smaller volumes - this worked IMO ...


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