18

Although you have the right to tell the truth, that is not defined by what you just know must be true. The truth must be verifiable. What proof do you have to publish, or to back up what you publish (like video)? The word of a victim that, conceivably, might be lying to you? Professional news outlets, reporters and editors, are trained and consult lawyers ...


14

I don't have any special knowledge of journalism, but I have a fair amount of experience with academic writing as well as giving advice to my grad students. Here's my take, all at the paper level: You're right about the possibility of sensationalism. I tell some of my students to imagine someone reading their work twenty years from now. Too much enthusiasm ...


11

Well, having been a Social Science major and a Journalism minor who has written several academic papers and worked for a variety of newspapers and magazines here is the difference for me. In academic writing you generally introduce a topic by presenting a thesis or a hypothesis, then you lay out the premise of the discussion, then you discuss the topic and ...


9

As an ex-journalist my guideline is - just write it, two hours and done. Later try not to think too much about it, focus on the next story instead and come back. If you've got the time for it, review the text on the next day, correct the most obvious things and send it. Other way, if you spend too much time on it, you can pretty quickly get bored with ...


9

Makes an emotional and social impact Making a point of how many women and/or children perished or were harmed in a given event makes a larger emotional and social impact. It turns the causative entity into a cruelty or an horror, be it an impersonal force such as nature or certain views on god(s), or be it a personal force such as a person, group of persons,...


7

I'm pretty sure it originates as a Journalism style. It is a newspaper era journalism technique and ultimately I think its an easy and quick way for journalists to answer two of the important 'W's right off the bat. As soon as you begin reading you know where and when, and the story can focus on explaining the who, what, and why. It saves print. With all ...


7

If the article is published, you're trying to shut the door after the horse has bolted. As @JasonBassford says you needed to have had an agreement in place that enabled you to approve edits before publication. You could ask for the article itself to be removed, or request that your name be removed from it, but even then, cached versions will remain on the ...


7

I was the editor of my university paper back in the day. Chris Sunami's answer is right; university newspapers are produced by amateurs, people learning the trade (who might not even be taking journalism-related coursework), and they sometimes err. In addition to following the very good advice from Chris, you can ask for a retraction in the next edition. ...


6

An important consideration is that in the US, the FTC requires clear disclosure of paid reviews by bloggers. Both the advertiser and the blogger may be held liable if the blogger does not disclose that the review was paid. From http://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-publishes-final-guides-governing-endorsements-testimonials/...


6

This is called an indirect (or secondhand) quote. Typically, the advice is to replace it with a primary quote if at all possible. But in an oral recollection like this, it might not be possible to recover the primary source. If possible, I'd suggest NOT placing the putative quotation in quotation marks, which are usually reserved for exact quotes that you ...


6

"Bob Said" is an "attribution". It attributes the spoken words to a particular person. Alternatives include... an "introductory phrese" such as... "According to Bob, " or "Bob reported that " followed by the quote in its entirety. an "introductory sentence" such as... "During a recent interview with Bob, the expert had much to say on the subject of ...


6

I think Orwell would still succeed. For one, a century ago there were simply fewer qualifications to be had; and there has been massive "education inflation" since then; in the USA the number of Bachelor's degrees per capita has gone from about 4% in 1925 to over 30% today. Thus, what we would call "high school education" or "some college" (which Orwell ...


6

Everything else aside, if the writing style you use is going to make the piece exceed the maximum length, then I would change your writing style. The writing style you used to compose this question is succinct but also conveys all necessary information and flows well. It's a remarkably different style from the example that you quoted. I suspect that when ...


5

There's no single standard about this. Whether you engage your readers is up to you, in some cases up to your editor at the publication in question (or perhaps their policies). Barring that kind of guidance, here are the pros and cons of reading the comments and replying to them: Joining the discussion can make you part of the community. This can create ...


5

There are two reasons. First, as described in this answer, news articles are written as an inverted pyramid and are designed to be cut at any paragraph break and still work. In the late stages of newspaper assembly, the editor making the decisions about what goes where and making it all fit is not going to read and decide -- he's going to lop it off at a ...


5

The most important thing to consider is whether or not there are valid justications for the effort of changing posts to the past tense, given that you are increasing your workload and increasing the risk of introducing errors into the text. In terms of justifications, the only one I can think of is that readers may get confused reading something in the ...


5

As I see it, getting paid for reviews can be broken down into different scenarios: You work for someone that pays you to review other products i.e. you're being paid by a neutral party with no affiliation to the product itself. You are approached by someone with a vested interest in the product, and are either paid to review that product, or get given the ...


5

Your assumption about hours rather than days for the mechanical processes of writing (a feature article, for example) is probably correct. I have "text entered" 1000 words in a day more than once. The proviso is that the work has been built and rebuilt in my head over several days (possibly weeks) before I commit to the keyboard. On those occasions when ...


5

I would use a colon rather than a dash and I would write the word 'and' instead of using a symbol. Although colons and dashes are often interchangeable, in this case the extra piece could be considered a 'title' or 'definition' of what went before. Dashes are usually used for extra information. Also, if you look at article titles (in anything I read), they ...


5

It's a simplistic answer, I know, but the qualification both Orwell and Wodehouse shared was that they were excellent writers. There's a tendency to think of qualifications as pieces of paper issued by an academic body, but it's a much broader term. When the question comes up in an interview a skilled candidate can use it to show how they know they're good ...


5

This is probably a not uncommon problem for less professional publications, where editorial norms may not be as well-understood. That's not to say that ALL college publications are less professional, but some of them certainly are. I'm sure the editor thinks he/she was doing you a big favor. I would start by having a conversation with the publication, but ...


5

Jason is right about style. At the risk of sounding like Admiral Ackbar, it's a trap. The people setting the paper know you don't have any direct experience and it sounds to me more like an exercise in journalism than creative writing (the two should be different, whatever impressions the media might give to the contrary). The people setting the paper will ...


5

The editor of a small college magazine really, really ought to have legal counsel readily available. If the magazine has some official affiliation with the college, then the college's lawyers may be available for consultation. Otherwise, a relationship with a proper lawyer should be part of the magazine's budget. You say you believe you can prove that ...


4

When I worked for a major web portal, I was "in a different dept" and all I got was a bit of word on mouth, coffee gossip and "customer interview" (editors discussing features they needed in the portal), so take this with a grain of salt, especially that it was a moderately average portal in a backwater country on an unfashionable continent. The job is 95% ...


4

That would be the "author bio" Here are some links that may be of use: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-to-write-a-terrific-author-bio/ http://www.absolutewrite.com/freelance_writing/bio.htm


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