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28

If I were a rich man, all day long I'd sit and write. To elaborate: What do you eat while you're writing your first novel? Did you manage to get your first novel published? What do you eat until the novel gets published? Once the novel has been published and you're seeing some money from it, how long does it feed you? Does it feed you for enough time to ...


20

I will presume you mean that you can write and get paid for it, and could actually choose a life as a professional writer, without starving. If that is the case (and this answer is tailored to your situation) your problems are quite similar to the problems of a free-lance "gig" programmer; a technical contractor. I have done that job. Or a self-employed ...


7

I feel like this sounds like the employer is the one who really needs me and I sound like I am scarce. That's fair. It seems like the employer does need you more than you need them, and you're not being rude about it. I wouldn't worry about it. I do not know how to end the e-mail. I am 14 so I do not really know what to write so it would not sound ...


6

Loneliness: Writing is primarily a solitary activity. Many software developers are introverts already, so lots of solitude and isolation may not bother you, but for me, as a social person, it's one of the main barriers to happiness as a writer. Disconnection From Reality: You're going to be spending an awful lot of time inside your own head, and as a ...


6

As the copy editor, I believe you'd be responsible for the text itself, the person who does the actual work of editing. As the Editor in Chief, I think you'd be responsible for the bigger picture and for more management-type tasks. For which position would be more fulfilling or challenging, that depends on you. Do you like to focus on the nitty gritty ...


5

Typically, the advice for sample scripts is to write a sample for a close competitor of your target. It may sound counter-intuitive, but it shows that you can write in the immediate ballpark of what they are looking for, but without raising issues with a) your conception of the characters not aligning with theirs and b) the possibility that you might ...


5

Your question is: What are the occupational hazards to being a full-time writer? But based on what you describe I would flip that and perhaps ask: What are the occupational hazards to being a part-time software developer? The reality is simple economics anywhere in the world: There is more of a need for—and thus more stability in—being a software ...


5

Russo-Ukrainian writer Yuri Nikitin (author of one of the longest novel series The Richard Longarms Cycle) wrote in his memories that if you write for more than 3-4 hours per day, there is a high risk of developing aversion to writing. He justifies it using the statistics of the writers he knows. The progression is like this: A writer produces one book per ...


4

Strictly speaking, you don't need an English degree to get writing jobs, nor are you guaranteed any kind of job in writing/editing/publishing if you have said degree. You get hired when you convince someone that you have the skills and/or experience to do the job. Whether you get that experience in our out of school is often irrelevant. I can say, as ...


4

There are few jobs that require only writing skills. Most jobs will want effective writing for some specific purpose, which requires specialization. Journalism Technical writing. Translation. (Including academic, technical, or medical translation.) Copywriting. Publishing and publishing services. Within each of these fields, there will be different ...


4

There is no "usual" rate because writing skills are a very wide spectrum ranging from "kid out of high school who thinks they are a writer because their Dragonball fanfic got over 2000 views" and "world renowned bestseller author whose name alone guarantees millions of readers". Think about how much you consider your writing services worth per hour. While ...


4

Alcoholism has been described as a major occupational hazard for writers (not only in this article but my memory is failing me and that's what a few minutes of googling could uncover).


4

Do it exactly the same way the company does it. If you know what job to apply for, it's because you saw it in an ad, on their website, or in another listing. The hyphen and the slash are used differently. The hyphen means "this job is for a data scientist doing dynamic pricing." The slash means "this job is a combination data scientist and machine ...


4

In many (most?) companies you do not need a degree or certificate; what you need is demonstrated skill. Technical writing is not a super-common degree to begin with; many technical writers have degrees in English or computer science or other fields. I had a writer on my team once whose degree was in history. Further, for very technical documentation, ...


4

...are there some opportunities where one could profit from his/her writing skills? Yes indeed, there are many opportunities - but it comes down to which writing skills you have, and how well you can sell what you have to offer. As a professional I use a wide range of skills depending on the kind of job I'm doing: expertise in grammar and orthography are ...


4

Well, as a software developer who is a partner to a full time published (4x) author, I can attest that hazards will include: Arguing. Authors have a lot of "characters" in their head at any one time, so you'll surely find yourself taking on the persona of one of them at some point. Actions taken by the recipient could be to shake their head and walk away ...


4

Writing, as a career, suffers from what I call The Artist's Bane -- there is more talent out there than there is market to support that talent. But you can sell what you write, if you're willing to put in the effort. But do address the question of marketing before your book is printed. Once it's available for sale, if you then ask how do I actually sell ...


4

I was a division manager of a public company, at one point in my life (for four years). Not all managers are the same, But for me: Skip the emoji, just tell the truth and ask for a decision. Dear Sir, We discussed a job last xxxx and I left my resume with you. I know you were in the middle of renovations, So there would be some delay. I am ...


3

emoting is not recommended unless you are describing your excitement for the prospect. It's considered respectful to follow up after a week and let them know you are still interested. Good job seekers don't stop until they get a "no".


3

Getting a job without a degree is difficult no matter what the field is now. Most middle of the road careers require a degree, ANY degree as long as you have one. Some careers such as Software Engineering or Lawyers require specific degrees to their field. Journalism is a field that is highly competitive. Even just 100 years ago, the world literacy rate ...


2

Because you posted this question in the Writers Stack Exchange, and the company promotes/recommends activities, it seems likely that the internship involves writing. As an intern, you will shine if you accomplish the following: Take the initiative to research information, solve problems, and find answers to questions. Listen well to instructions, and ...


2

Your question is very specific: which one would be more fulfilling or challenging. At a start-up, there is no doubt in my mind that editor-in-chief would be more challenging. A copy editor can always make a weak excuse and slip out the door. The editor-in-chief is there until the last typo is fixed. Being the editor-in-chief would be very exciting, not to ...


2

I'm not sure how much help I'm going to be, since in the end a lot of these things come down to subjective likes and dislikes, but here's a few thoughts: The pattern of "problem, action, result" is often recommended for resume-type writing. The goal is to prove your skills and experience with a concrete example of how you had a problem, what you did to try ...


1

As with any art form, the creative, personally fulfilling writing is what everyone wants to do --only the best make money at it, and there's a glut of aspiring hopefuls. The writing that consistently makes money is functional writing that fulfills some kind of ongoing need. Here are some examples of that kind of writing: Niche reference materials: If ...


1

You can profit from your writing, but it will be harder to. Small publishers are more hesitant to publish your writing, and the bigger ones are too preoccupied (from my experience). If a book you write is something that strikes close to the publisher's heart or is a book they lavish in great amounts, your book will be more likely to be published faster (and ...


1

There's a whole movement of folks working in the technical documentation field who are not "technical writers" or "technical authors" per se, but who care deeply about good documentation, and many are extremely talented, dedicated folks doing an excellent job - as a group, they tend to refer to themselves as "documentarians" and the loose affiliation they ...


1

I know you are looking for data, but based on your edit I will say, don't worry about the numbers, or how many are trying out for the job. Does it change the way you interview if you know you are the only one vs 1 of 100? Hopefully not if you want to get hired because nothing says it has to be you guaranteed or from the 100. They could still choose to wait. ...


1

There is no right or easy answer to this question. If you asked 1000 screenwriters how they got their break you'd get 1000 different answers but the single continuous thread that will run through every answer is "Write an amazing screenplay." Seriously, the world is always looking for writers and good screenplays will always get noticed. On a practical ...


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