51

Explain what needs to be explained as it becomes relevant rather than trying to present all the information in one go. This has certain advantages: it avoids dumping all the information on the audience in one indigestible lump. it actually makes the world feel bigger. Info-dumps tend to bore readers to tears so avoid them: instead tell your readers the ...


39

You want to spend as little time as possible on "setup". Even one page of nothing but setup is too much. The reason for that is that the reader is not yet invested in your story. You'd be forcing a reader to read something akin to a fantasy-encyclopedia about something he has no reason to care for. That's boring, readers aren't going to do that. Instead, ...


23

The Wizard of Oz: What makes the first part of The Wizard of Oz engaging is the wicked witch, on her bicycle, stealing Toto. Each of the Oz characters is introduced in Kansas, within Dorothy's normal life. Also - She runs away from home. Also - Auntie Em thinks Dorothy will die. So, there are a lot of stakes here, in boring Kansas. Dog is stolen, kid runs ...


22

The easiest way is to have someone say the name while looking at the animal and having a frame in your comic where the animal is the center. If you have an animal that plays the role that cats play in our real world for example you could have someone angrily say "Get the damn qutie from our table!" with a frame where this person is getting a water spray ...


11

Look at The Stand (by Stephen King), Tolkien. Send your characters on a journey. I haven't read the above in decades, but they have many characters (far more than eight) and you can follow their pattern: Characters are introduced as the story is developing. You already say each incident is different. You need to link your incidents into a story line, that ...


11

Conflict and Action. It doesn't make a difference what your character does, really, as long as she is in conflict in every scene, small or large. From disagreements with friends or enemies to fighting, or running, or defying her mother or father or brother or sister or teacher or school counselor or class bully, male or female. Perhaps she makes an error in ...


11

An abstract is a quick summary or overview of the entire piece. It's used for search results (manual or computerized) — basically, the reader is saying, "Is this the piece I need as a source for X task?" The introduction can vary in information and tone. It can be the classic "Tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em," it can be a way to guide the ...


10

You don't have to start the story directly with the song. Establish a proper setting first where you create a scene with someone who is singing your song. You can make the song stand out with extra indentation and text formatting (italics for example). After that you can always introduce the reader to the rest of the story.


9

To start with, you have too many invented terms without definition all in a row. Hearthsoul, assassin pouches, luck fairy? You also have enough mistakes that I really can't tell if some of these things are typos or more jargon. His enemies tailed? The land drifted? What does that even mean? You "recite" something which is repeated or often said; it's not ...


8

One way would be to condense the "Kansas" part as much as possible. I don't have "The Wizard of Oz" on me, but let's look at "The Hobbit" as a similar example. It starts with about two pages of what are hobbtis. Bilbo is established in one paragraph: "This hobbit was a very well-to-do hobbit, and his name was Baggins. The Bagginses had lived in the ...


8

If Tolkien had started The Hobbit or the Lord of the Rings with the Silmarillion, no-one would ever have got to the story. Most people can't stomach the Silmarillion even after they've read the novels. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Silmarillion Similarly with Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time Series. Robert Jordan is particularly good at dropping hints ...


7

The two words which come to mind for me are: Prologue (or prolog) - would work especially well if writing an epilogue Prelude Another word which might be used is preamble, but I don't think that would work as well. EDIT: Conversely to annotating the introduction, you could always put it at the beginning and not call it anything. If the chapters are ...


7

I would try to introduce the characters in groups. If some of them are friends with each other, that makes a natural group. Even enemies can make a good group for an introduction, perhaps a police detective and the criminal she caught. I agree that introducing them as individuals would make it difficult for me to stay interested when reading. I would be ...


7

Annoying the reader is almost never a good strategy. So your focus should be on annoying the protagonist. That, in turn, is a matter of developing your protagonist's personality and goals in such a way that the minions intrude on it. Maybe he just doesn't like self-important blowhards. Or maybe he's got places he needs to be, and the procession is ...


6

Okay, it is a difficult problem. I think I would group the characters into groups of 3 and 5. The human brain likes patterns and grouping things together. That's also how some people can count really fast. Or think about how people have a certain pattern for remembering their phone number. So, you could start with 3 friends and then have a certain event ...


6

re:Oz; I haven't read the book; but in the movie there was a lot of conflict and every moment was about playing up the sympathy angle with Dorothy. This is the most important thing going into a crisis: You want your characters at one of the far ends of the spectrum on sympathy. If you hate them, you'll be happy to see them suffer; if you love them, you'll ...


6

After having read far too many books and watched far too many movies that would have been great if they had just been edited more tightly, I have to ask: If the second two thirds are great, can you just lose the first third? Maybe that section is really important world-building, but for you, not for the audience. If there's stuff you really need, maybe ...


6

I don't know much about writing, but studying maths maybe I can give you some ideas anyway. First: Just because someone likes science doesn't mean they just walk through it and understand everything because they are such a genius (in contrast to how "science people" are usually depicted in fiction). This stuff is hard. That is why professors in STEM degrees ...


6

This surely differs depending on the perspective of your story and your writing style in general. The best advice I can give you is: Try. Try to write how you imagine that would "feel" and/or what you would pay attention when and how. The most commonly used point of view (I've been told) is third person, past tense. It could be as simple as: "John ...


6

Have a "Cast of Characters" line up at the beginning showing all your characters with their names and include the creature(s) in some typical pose such as sitting on their owner's shoulder. You can also introduce dynamic by having an antagonistic character (if any) scowling or something at the creature on the other character's shoulder.


6

At my publishing company, we would ask well-known preachers to read our book then write something for the introduction or just a review for the back cover. I don't believe any of them were paid, but seeing as they were friends of my boss and ultimately not in it for the money, that would be why. I would offer them a flat fee if they are someone you ...


5

There's nothing wrong with writing a foreword to a book; ones written by the translator are sometimes called something like "Translator's Foreword" or "About this Translation", etc. Whether you should write this foreword is a question that can be answered simply: Is what you want to say of interest to the reader? Will reading this foreword be time well ...


5

Other answers are correct that you should skip over exposition of all kinds. They're consistent with answers to other questions on this site. Furthermore, they're consistent with a lot of my own experience as a reader. But any good writing teacher would promise you that once you understand the rules you're free to break them! I see three other approaches ...


5

Either can work really well! The thing to pay attention to is that each option builds a different sequence and experience for the reader -- so you want to consider which of the two choices works better for your story. A good general guideline is that at the beginning of the book, the reader is looking for "what is this book about." They'll latch on to, ...


5

Don't introduce them all at once --that's not a story, that's a cast list. Bring them in one at a time, or in small groups, when needed by the storyline, and describe them in ways that illuminate their importance to the protagonist and the narrative: There, standing outside the door was Rachel. Her once flame-red hair was now tinged with gray. As I saw ...


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