44

In technical writing it is important to be precise. If you want to state something, it should generally be stated in the clearest language possible. In a comment you say: I very specifically need to refer to the timeframe of June-July-August. and since you want a replacement for "Summer 2019" I suggest one of the following: June-August 2019 June, July, ...


10

I believe the word "temping" is culturally-specific, but not along national lines of culture. An American with experience in corporate environments where temps are common would know the word. A Brit without that corporate experience might not. In either case, the word is pretty self-explanatory. I would use it without hesitation in anything I wrote.


9

Many global corporations just say Q1, Q2, Q3. So Q3 2019.


9

You may benefit from taking a big breath and looking at the situation from outside. You are Indian and you grew up in a society with richly pervasive traditions to which you feel bound. A Japanese person has also grown up in a society with richly pervasive traditions to which they naturally feel bound and which will influence everything they write. An ...


8

Follow the rules set out on the page you want to copy from. The railway schedule is part of the Bob MacIntosh Collection. Bob has given the DARDPI wiki permission to use his image collection and for individuals to enjoy them for their own personal study of the D.A.R. Bob MacIntosh reserves all rights on his image collection for any commercial use ...


7

Depending on where you live, you own the copyright to a written work the instant you write it. (See Berne Convention.) You don't have to apply for copyright. You already own the copyright. There may be legal benefits to registering your copyright with your government. In the US, for example, when you sue someone for copyright infringement, you may gain ...


6

The answer would seem to be to remember the point of view of the narrator. If you are writing from the protagonists point of view, then write it from the language that the protagonist speaks. if (s)he goes into a shop and doesn't understand anything that is said, then say that they had to point at what they wanted etc If later on the protagonist learns the ...


6

Most books set in a foreign country nevertheless give all dialog in the language of the intended audience. That is, if you are writing for, say, an English-speaking audience, you give all dialog in English, even if the story is set in France or on the planet Vulcan. For the obvious reason: if the reader doesn't understand the dialog, the book won't make any ...


6

I highly recommend http://agentquery.com. It's free, searchable by category and oriented towards North American agents. I haven't personally had any luck yet securing an agent through them, but the listings all seem to be legitimate, and comparable to the ones you can find through other valid sources. I do recommend, however, taking the time to click ...


5

I am currently reading a book where the majority of characters speak one language (Japanese), but two characters additionally speak a different language (Latin). If a character is speaking in Japanese, it is written in normal English: You are beautiful but when one of the characters wants to talk in Latin (so that no-one else can understand), the author ...


4

Provide dialog in the language of your narration and use distorted spelling to indicate the accent of your character (and other poor speakers). You could also use distorted spelling to indicate the way your character mishears the foreign language. — Huts a dime. — Come again? — I asked, trying to make sense of the fluent speech. — What’s the time? — he ...


4

It's hard for anyone to get published anywhere. I recommend writing your book in Brazilian Portuguese, so you have the full range of expression that every author gets from writing in their primary language. Assuming you're in Brazil, you'll also get more support and better feedback from your friends there than from a remote English-speaking audience. Focus ...


4

This is, indeed, the translator's job. For example, here's Gili Bar-Hilel, talking about translating the Harry Potter books into Hebrew: Fantasy books are often full of imaginary words created by the author and I am curious how you go about translating such words. Do you rewrite them in Hebrew, make up your own words to replace them, or use some other ...


4

This is NOT a great or complete answer, just the start of one, as it's been unanswered for a bit. https://www.statista.com/statistics/288746/global-book-market-by-region/ and https://www.statista.com/topics/4062/book-market-in-europe/ (I'm not a subscriber to this, so I don't get the complete set of reports, which may answer your question)


4

This answer is mainly speculation, but it's speculation based on what I have seen come out the pipeline from a few nations. Based on the sheer number of fantasy Light Novel series Japan publishes each year, I'd have to say they sell the most. This assumes, of course, that we are using the following variables: We are talking about print, not comics. (Include ...


4

It really depends on what you signed in that original publishing contract. Did you give them world rights? If so, you could end up in trouble. As an independent, you should seriously consider joining the Alliance of Independent Authors or The Society of Authors. Both of which will review contracts and let you know where you stand. Good luck!


4

Contacting a legal professional familiar with Canadian copyright law is strongly advised - The act of scanning a work frequently establishes a new copyright of that scan, and is not something easily decided by a quick paragraph from a random website. So while you may scan a public domain document and freely use it as you wish, you often can't download ...


4

Allow me to introduce you to a game-changing author who at age 19 wrote a morally complicated "pot boiler" about a privileged jerk who plays god then abandons his responsibility. This novel has everything: an anti-hero who fails his redemption arc, a villain who is articulate and sympathetic, and a heretical theme so aggressively feminist that Christianity ...


4

Stop being an Indian writer, and become a writer. There is an Elton John bio movie coming out. He was born Reginald Dwight and changed his name. In one of the preview clips somebody tells Reginald "You have to stop being the person you were born to be, and become the person you want to be." Same thing for you. Being born Indian doesn't mean you have to ...


3

We have Temp Agencies in America, that, as their name implies, find temporary work for people. The people who work in temporary positions are referred to as "temps." I first heard the word in ordinary conversation when a friend referred to an acquaintance as a temp. So I recognized the verb "temping" immediately. However, I'd never heard "temp" used as a ...


3

Use angle quotes: "Speaking in English" «Speaking in Portuguese» This also has the advantage of being actual (former) usage according to Wikipedia.


3

I'm also Spanish and when I read a translated book, let's say Harry Potter (his nationality doesn't affect to the plot), I don't care if he's British or wherever. If you wrote the story in the way you think is the best, I don't think you should change it; even more when you say it (the nationality) doesn't affect.


3

Under US copyright law, anything created by the US government is not protected by copyright. It is automatically public domain. (There are some complexities to this that we could get into but they're not relevant here.) But it doesn't necessarily follow that every other country in the world has the same laws. In the case of the Soviet Union, the Soviet ...


3

There are a few simple ways to do that. ‘The second season of the year’. It feels a tad uncomfortable but it works. You can simply say which month or date it is. Regardless of where you are in the world the dates stay the same* (so December is warm in the southern hemisphere while July is cold). ‘Halfway through the year’ would be summer in the north and ...


3

A lot of writers seem to assume that the "four seasons" are universal. They may occur at different times but everyone has them. In reality a substantial proportion of the world's population live in the tropics, where temperatures and hours of daylight are fairly uniform throughout the year. There may be "wet" or "dry" or "monsoon" seasons but no "summer" or "...


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