23

Let me tell you something: ALL WRITERS, OR AT LEAST THE VAST MAJORITY, HAVE EXPERIENCED THIS. Don't worry. I've experienced this before. This is something many of us as writers face. But if you wait for inspiration, it will never come. You must give yourself inspiration. Waiting for it to happen is like getting a train to drive on water. Without tracks. Now, ...


13

The first thing you should do is look at the answer to this question. Then realize that this is not an issue, but something that you can use greatly to your advantage. However, you still have the problem of not having your own style. I will address that below. I am a natural mimic as well. When I started out writing, I wrote like whatever I read. I was ...


12

I understand the feeling. However, the way to write better is to critique. Write a full scene when you aren't inspired - force yourself to finish it. Then critique it - what is missing from the scene that is present in your inspired writing. What is the fundamental difference between the two types of writing? If you can isolate those points and then work on ...


9

Are you absolutely certain that your writing is bad when you're not inspired? Or is this just what it feels like to you at the time? For me personally, the best writing advice I ever heard (although I've sadly forgotten the source) was from a published author who said this: although he himself could tell the difference between the parts of the story he ...


9

As somebody who has lots of story ideas but really struggles to get them written to completion, I can personally relate to this, and I would love to offer some advice that helped me to get through this problem. Hopefully it will help you too! What happened to me Over the past few months, I've been writing a cyberpunk detective story. It's a new genre venture ...


7

Consider that the theme in author A's book that is inspiring you was almost certainly found by author A in author B's work and inspired them, and so on. What's important is that you find a unique and original way to weave a story around that theme. For instance: Humble, unremarkable individual finds, quite by accident, some supremely important object ...


7

Two things come to mind. 1. Try to figure out what time of the year you have periods of high creativity. If you have consistent trouble coming up with ideas in spite of all other factors remaining the same, you could have a form of Seasonal Affective Disorder or something similar. The tendency for some people to get depressed in the winter is well known, ...


6

Every block of stone has a statue inside it, and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it. — Michelangelo Buonarroti There is a convincing, exciting, captivating story that you are carving from blank paper with your plans and words. If you are not in the mood for working on some of the finest part of your story, you can go somewhere else and ...


5

If you have similar characters, scenes and plot line, you are too close to the source material. Having a similar plot, idea or device is fine, but you have to find a way to make it yours. If simply being similar to an idea or plot was forbidden, no one would be able to write a story as pretty much every possible plot has been used somewhere.


4

One thing I can say is, do not stress yourself out. That would be rule number one. Other than that, the medium does matter. Writing directly on a forum may put on the pressure for you. Best to dose it correctly, neither too high nor too low. Different subject matter will require different levels of effort. Writing a light-hearted message about an average ...


4

You have a few options: Your story didn't fail. It just didn't find its audience on that site. Post it somewhere else. Your story didn't fail. It just didn't find its audience right now. Post it again in six months. Your story didn't fail. It just needs an editor (or at least a beta reader). Find someone to read it and help you improve it. Your story didn't ...


4

You can't have fast action scenes without slow, wind-down scenes, because if everything is fast, how can you tell it's fast, when you have no slow scenes to compare them to? The same way you can't have light without the dark, good without evil. If everything is the same pace, the same rhythm, it's neither slow nor fast, it becomes the norm. It's monotonous ...


4

I always studied the hero's journey, where the main character goes trough a development process that works for most (if not all) plots. J. K. Rowling used that in all her Harry Potter's books, and I think they are awesome examples. Basically, the character goes trough these steps (I'm sorry if I didn't use the correct English terms): Everyday life The ...


4

If you can describe things well then don't worry about not being able to create story. Every writer is different in his/her style. Once you start writing you can move into different genres of it. For you at this phase, you can do the following: Travel writing Content and technical writing Blogs - you can write any genre of blogs Fashion Blogger - if ...


4

Ghost writing? You can even make money from it. Editing would also be good for you I think. Also journalism, biography novels, travel stories, memoirs. For example you can create a blog and include stories of places you have visited. Just an example.


4

It's okay to have a world without ever writing a story set in it. Nobody is telling you that you have to do anything with your world; sometimes it's fun to just imagine. That's perfectly fine. If you just want to be able to remember the world you are creating and not feel like it's going to waste, you could try just writing about it. Not a story, just ...


4

RE copyright: Copyright protects the specific words in a story, not an idea. If you took someone else's book and rewrote it all in your own words, changed the names of the places and characters, etc, your book might be totally unoriginal, but it would not violate the original author's copyright. There can be hazy cases like, for example, if you write a song ...


3

“Where do you get your inspiration?” This is an often hated, and feared, Q author’s get. Their ability to generate good ideas at the drop of a pin seems unnatural and exceptional to non-writers. They appear like inspired and gifted individuals for whom muses dance. A couple years ago I started developing a story mostly based on my life. After a few weeks ...


3

Take elements from multiple sources and combine them in a unique way. The reality is that none of us is entirely original; we all borrow (consciously or unconsciously) from others. French writer Georges Polti claimed in the 19th century that there were only 36 dramatic situations that could occur in a story or performance. More recently Christopher Booker ...


3

I've suffered something similar, though not exactly same situation. My suggestion is that you make a simple excel sheet and daily record how many words you wrote and how many pages you read that day. Add a row every day. It doesn't matter if you only read few sentences or your mind wasn't concentrated during reading time. Just record the numbers and make a ...


2

I have a bit of a writing exercise to suggest. I used it myself when tying to "find my voice", and probably absorbed the idea from someone else. First, pick a simple setting that is fairly open-ended and adaptable to many styles and genres. Then (without any specific characters, plot, or ending in mind) begin to write a scene in that setting in each style ...


2

Several thoughts here. The first is, don't be discouraged by failure. Learn from it and move on. We all fail sometimes. Thomas Edison, when discussing his attempts to invent a practical light bulb, once said, "I haven't failed. I've found 600 ways that don't work." His point was, trying something and discovering that it doesn't work is a natural part of ...


2

A snappy sarcastic answer is tempting... Something like, "How about Craigslist?" But on second thought... What you're looking for is for someone to solve your problems with writers block for you, rather than solving them yourself. Writers block is something that all writers have from time to time. There are a number of questions here that address it ...


2

Autobiographical writing is difficult, because you know exactly what happened. You can't fudge it. Plus, you're writing about emotions and psychological issues, which are notoriously difficult to get right, even in fiction. Combining the two, it isn't surprising that you are having trouble. So, don't stress. Keep at it. Here is an exercise you can ...


2

I agree with this answer that developing characters will help you to write stories (which don't have to be full-blown books). Another approach you can take is to write very short stories or even just scenes in your world. These aren't necessarily full stories (though they can be), and you might never reuse them in a longer work; think of it as verbal ...


2

I'd use a TTRPG Rulebook. Pathfinder's Core rulebook is found online: Google 'pathfinder core rulebook pdf' Lots to go on there, and if you need more - find the subsequent additions i.e. Ultimate Equipment, Advanced Players Guide, etc. Hope that helps!


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