36

Even if you don't intend to index your entries by page number, you'll annoy quite a few people if you omit page numbers. Librarians, who need to file number of pages, printers, who need page numbers to assemble the book from sheets, archivists, who prepare digital copies and need page numbers for these, ...and so on. Table of contents should always refer ...


13

Pages are the unit by which users manipulate physical books. Personally I hate books that are indexed in anything other than page numbers. Even if your excerpt sizes are extremely consistent I'll still hate you for making me do math in my head (there are about 6 excerpts per page, so to find excerpt 1397 I should turn to approximately page...uh...hrm.) If ...


9

This does not seem to follow conventional usage. It is common in indexes or other references to a page number, that if you want to specify that something begins on one page but continues or repeats on the following pages, you give the page number followed by "ff", e.g. "page 24 ff", meaning, "page 24 and following". In a condensed format like an index, you ...


7

What goes into your index will be defined by your readers' needs. How will they use your book? Will they come in with knowledge of (and vocabulary from) a related subject? Are they experts or novices or some of each? An index's primary job is to have an answer when somebody comes to it with a question. Here are some guidelines that I've learned over ...


6

If you are ever going to print the book then page numbers are essential for Librarians, Archivists, Academics, Researchers and a lot of people who interact with the physical object of the book. e.g. This is the 2018 edition 603 pages and XXII pages of indicia. The other reason for page numbers is to identify if someone rips a page out of your book. ...


5

If you want anyone with any academic pretensions (e.g. undergraduates, researchers) to cite your book you must include page numbers so that it can be easily referenced. As well, I have used books that use section numbers rather than page numbers in indexes and they are really annoying -- how do you know where a section starts or ends?


4

I googled your query and found this: https://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/quicklinks/2017-08/indexing_instructions_for_authors_0.pdf Endnotes are referred to by page (on which the text of the note appears), the letter “n,” and the note number, with no internal space (504n14). If a footnote is indexed, this is indicated by listing an “n” after the ...


4

It sounds you are mostly concerned about page numbers getting confused with entry numbers. One way you could rectify this – assuming your book has chapters – is to number the excerpts with a dot notation using the chapter number first. Thus, Chapter 1 would have Excerpts 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, etc., and Chapter 2 would start with Excerpt 2.1, then continue ...


2

I would say it depends on how the item is discussed in the body of the book. If a Markov chain is something referred to as a single entity, then index it as a single item. If you discuss several of them at once, or generalize (like saying "black holes have thus-and-such properties"), I'd use the plural.


2

From experience I would suggest as much as possible. Many writers/editors try to be smart and reduce the size of the index, but then you end up looking for something you know is in the book, but you can't find it. If you want include a qucik index with the most common or prominent items too. The other thing is the TOC, I would suggest two versions there two,...


2

I remember that some Gamebooks didn't have page numbers, but excerpts numbers. Normally a book of the "Fighting Fantasy" series had 400 of these sequential excerpts, and you could easily find them by turning multiple pages and making an intuitive search. So your answer is: No. Not all books should have page numbers. Also, the concept of pages is becoming ...


2

You need pointers. But when they are inherent in the content, and self-indexing, I'm going to stick my neck out and say no, you don't necessarily need page numbers. We manage very well without them in eBooks. I'm not impressed by the argument that printers would muddle up the pages without them. My experience with printers is that they reproduce the PDF ...


2

From the other answers it seems clear that, perhaps unfortunately, you need to use page numbers, at least in print. And you don't want to connect the excerpt numbers to page numbers, to allow different editions with the same excerpt numbers. So why not make it easy to distinguish both uses of numbers? I mean, whenever you use a page number you write p87 (...


2

I'm assuming you're using Microsoft Word because you don't state otherwise. Firstly, press Control Z when it does this to reverse the change. Then you can keep typing. Secondly, you can go back and add the hyphen afterwards. Unless you have a large number of chapters, this may be the most efficient option. There are some annoying features of Word that I ...


2

Looking at a couple of examples, it looks like they usually list all references, but group them together. Foobar, 24, 38-45, 117 Just from looking at these numbers, the reader will be able to tell that they'll get more information about foobars in the longer section (possibly a chapter) starting at page 38.


1

Unlike the prescribed style guidance of writing that it (normally) be unambiguous and easy to read (in other words, that it avoid awkward-looking constructions), I don't believe there is any such consideration in the back matter of books. The rule is that if there is an article at the front of a title, it is placed at the end of the title after a comma. By ...


1

I've done it both ways, and have found that a hybrid approach ends up working best. Doing it at the end means you can focus just on indexing (not writing). You're more likely to be consistent in choice of terms, avoiding unintended synonyms where some entries are under term A and some are under term B but they should be together. If you do your own ...


1

This is really a matter for personal preference. There's no provably right answer. Personally, for my books, I didn't worry about the index until about the 4th draft. When I was basically happy with the text, then I stated thinking about terms that might be worth indexing. I'd think of a word I wanted to index, then do text searches on that word and add the ...


1

Having page numbers makes quality control easier for printed books. In any random or pseudo random group of people you will have a variation of intelligence. This is demonstrably true of pressmen. Some of them are stupid. some are mean or like to pretend to be stupid, so if your book has page numbers you are much less likely to have pages out of order and ...


1

If an established rule isn't available, one can solve this question using reason. Including names in citations helps readers and future researchers accomplish three important goals: Uniquely identify the author of a work. (Distinguish the author from other authors with similar names.) Identify multiple works by that author. Distinguish between works with ...


1

Keep in mind that you are talking about creating concordances, not subject indexes. Subject indexes cannot be done automatically but require human analysis for substance and quality. For quality results, a good search will search both the text and the human-created index, thereby giving you both concordance findings as well as analysis for relations, ...


1

It might be worth employing the services of a professional indexer to create the index as a separate document, rather than generate the index from embedded codes. The types of difficulties that you have noted are familiar to indexers. An index written by an indexer is probably only applicable to a PDF though.


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