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23

Why to abandon an idea In considering the question of whether or not you should write an idea you don’t like, my instinct would be no. If you don’t like it, it will show in the writing. If you are bored writing it, you can guarantee that your reader will be bored reading it. How excited you are by a project always comes across on the page. Why to press on ...


11

It's often a good idea to note your ideas down the moment you have them and then look at them at a later point. This makes sure that you have an interest in it that lasts long enough to actually get something done and you can change some of the biggest things. Most stories are re-written / edited quite a few times before they are released. If you just can'...


7

Your question is a bit all over the map but, ultimately, it's about tone. Your silly example would be fine for a first person narrator who loves puns and can never be completely serious. If it's the only time s/he ever said anything like that, it would be very out of place and jarring. If your example is a character's dialogue, then it depends on the ...


7

That's a really interesting question. What springs into my mind is wondering why you think it would be interesting to you as a writer, if not as a reader? I'd like to hear more on this, maybe with some examples. If not you, then who? Based on the information available, I'd agree with some of the other answers, that if it doesn't appeal to you as a reader,...


4

If the scene is supposed to be dramatic, a joke is out of place. Personally I did not find it funny, I thought it cliché. As a professional author and teacher, I am NOT in favor of the idea that "one should not hold back from any good ideas, regardless of how it impacts the current end result". If it negatively impacts the end result, it isn't a good ...


4

Female perspective here! (The first paragraph is the most fundamental part of my answer, about creating a strongly written female protagonist. Also refer to Chris Sunami's answer and links. The rest focuses more on portraying a female character, or character of any marginalized group, in an authentic manner.) Your female protagonist is the hero of her own ...


4

An option that I see often used in November during NanoWrimo is to "free the plot bunnies" -- if an idea occurs to you (maybe a Leprechaun/Ghoul romance and a particular issue to solve), but you really don't like romances, you can post the sketch of the idea into a "plot bunnies" thread, and then anyone who DOES want to do a supernatural romance, but is ...


4

What makes us as humans interested in reading about the suffering of the characters in the story? In fiction, they don't expect that suffering to last, at least not for the main characters or heroes they are identifying with. The suffering justifies what the heroes must do to overcome whatever evil or hardship they face. It is not watching gladiators or ...


3

Question: What makes a story interesting? Answer: Here are the things I find make stories interesting. Relationships. Think less about plot and more about how the parts (edit: the way the characters) fit together in helpful vs. harmful ways. Balance the relationships. Some good, some bad, show both. Conflict, but also support. Time. Good stories give us ...


3

I am a discovery writer, for two reasons. First, I have tried plotting out stories, and for me that takes all the creativity out of writing, I stop caring about the story and give up. It feels like a job, and I think that shows in my writing. I don't feel I write authentically about the character's emotions and lines, when I know exactly how it will all turn ...


3

Tell me why I should keep reading. Don't waste your reader's time. This is my mantra. The first sentence should foreshadow a conflict. That is at least what I find the greatest novels always stick with. Example: "We should start back," Gared urged as the woods began to grow dark around them. Why do you think George R.R. Martin began with this very ...


2

Release them as Plot Bunnies! NaNoWriMo has forums for "adopting out" plot bunnies -- see https://www.wikiwrimo.org/wiki/Plot_bunny for more info. Or just create a blog post where you list these ideas, and release them FREE into the world. They're not yours any more -- focus just on the ideas that you need for your work. This may be a sign that your ...


2

I think the main question here is why are you writing? If it's for some work thing, you might want to get a second opinion to make sure it's engaging, so that you can fulfill the work requirements. If it's just for fun, I think the most important thing is if you are enjoying the actual writing process. Personally, I've written stories that I would never ...


2

If you will enjoy writing it that's all that matters. The advice I've had from every professional novelist I've had the privilege to speak to personally is clear on this: write what you want to write how you want to write it. Usually with an addendum or two about the opinions of critics, editors and/or publishers tacked on. If you enjoy working on a piece ...


2

I am an old-school writer without fancy software (I have tried it and don't like it). So if I realize a previous event could have been explained better, I will back up and do it. However, I have a special notation in my writing; "NOTE:", and I will usually record one at the point I am NOW and what is going on, before I jump. If I have an idea for the ...


2

CON: The reasons to not write something you wouldn't read are pretty easy and straightforward: You are a stand-in for your potential audience. If even you aren't interested in this idea, that audience may not exist. It's hard to do a good job writing something that doesn't engage you. If you're writing in a unfamiliar genre, your writing may appear cliched ...


1

A metaphor: at the top of the mountain is a well-reasoned exposition of the events of the story along with the reactions of those entities occupying the story; by well reasoned, I mean that the events eventually make sense to the reader by the end of the story. No effects before the causes, no effects without causes, and no causes without effects. The story ...


1

Sometimes, I'll begin forming an idea, and then realize that the story wouldn't appeal to me as a reader, despite the fact that I have interest in it as a writer. If I wouldn't want to read the story, is writing it still a good idea? Yes, writing it is, but probably not polishing or publishing it. Write that story, and as you are going down a ...


1

Humour can ease tension and lighten the mood when things get dark, but that line seems better omitted. The line you mention in the situation you describe seems to undercut the tension of the scene. Watching a building, preparing to rescue a friend and that line runs the risk of making light of the entire situation. Why should the reader care if the author ...


1

Since your book is about a young girl coming to understand the world they way it is (which sounds much like a coming-of-age story for a teen or pre-teen, or perhaps a coming-to-adulthood story for an MC in their 20's); I suggest you focus on a metaphor for learning or transition. The Twilight series is for a character metaphorically transitioning (from girl ...


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