23

Generally, most readers won't care... and the ones who do are weird. "Going to the Bathroom" is only brought up for low brow humor or plot points (such as a detail of an escape). You can even draw attention to your omission by having a casual question tossed to the character ("Wait... how did you go to the bathroom?" met with "I'd ...


22

Hot Water: If you are going down that rabbit hole, you need to be SUPER careful. Writing in a historical period pretty much implies you stay consistent with history, except for the most trivial of details. I agree with Zeiss Ikon (+1), that going into alternative history is your safest bet. Establish up-front (possibly on the first page) that this is NOT the ...


20

I assume you mean something along the lines of Napoleon winning at Waterloo, or the British not getting caught with their pants down at King's Mountain and Cow Pens? It's usually easier to alter your story to fit the actual historical events than to stray into the (very detail-oriented) field of Alternate History. Change historical events, and don't follow ...


17

Changing history is slippery because it's a complex weave of causes and consequences, and even an expert might not know the full picture. I agree with Zeiss Ikon in their answer, the devil is in the details, and some readers will have vastly different opinions about what this or that change should entail. That's why my golden rule when fundamentally changing ...


15

This stinks! This is a slightly obscure question, and might be better answered someplace like the History SE or worldbuilding. It's more relevant if the character isn't from the period (like a time traveler), but the logistics of it won't be such a big deal for folks of the period. No one has felt the need to answer this question in books I've read unless ...


9

It depends on whether leaving out details would constitute a plot hole There is no problem in leaving out details - if those details are not very relevant. Many authors tend to omit "dirty" details related to bodily functions, and if your book, in general, is not very descriptive and realistic, this would be fine to omit those specifics too. ...


7

Shakespeare changed plenty of history in his "historical" plays. He killed off Richard-II about a decade early for dramatic effect. He freely changes ages -- searching for "Shakespeare accurate" gives plenty. A search on "The Crown accurate" (a popular historical TV show) reveals similar alterations. Sadly "Hamilton ...


5

It should be fine for you to skip certain chapters until you have research material as long as you: Have an outline of the chapters in which you are skipping. This way you won't have to completely rewrite the other chapters in order to fit them with the research and historical facts. Know enough about the time period so that you can at least write passably ...


5

In classic stories, like the tale of Prometheus (which I assume is the blueprint for this), this question is left out because it is unnecessary - you also wouldn't explain how the character took a breath or grew hair (unless it's a wizard beard) The classic story also had an awkward part where a bird eats Prometheus's liver each day, and no one cared if this ...


5

You have to come up with a solution. Whether you share that solution with the reader depends upon the genre, audience, and historical accuracy; whether the solution is an opportunity to show the personalty and motives of your characters; and whether who is telling the tale of the imprisonment would share these details. I do not think much detail is needed, &...


4

A Few Thoughts: I'm far from an expert, but here are a few things that come to mind. I struggle with short stories because I go slow, integrating facts in little dribbles throughout the story. But all this info must come in an organic, naturally-feeling way. This is far from exhaustive, and each done well is clever, done poorly is awful (and this is, ...


4

Answer in three parts, for writers with differing desires for historical accuracy. Part One: Writers who don't care much about research and history. Anyone can write a story set in historical periods and places and change anything they want to, and the historical fiction police will not come to their home in the middle of the night and drag them away to ...


4

I'm not quite sure what you mean by throat clearing. Based on the title, however, I'm assuming you mean introductory info-dumps, and am writing my answer based on that. There is no hard rule for this that I know. Meaning, I'm not sure there's any official limit to how many introductory remarks you can add. The main concern is holding your reader's interest. ...


3

"Show, don't tell!" It's always a good idea to show who your character is through their actions and dialogue. This way, there's no separation between "introducing the character" and "telling the story". It could be said that story is character. Instead of telling the reader what the Centenarian's hobby is, why not show the hobby ...


3

Well, first you write the first draft. Then you rewrite it several times before you have a finished story. (And then you submit it, and if it gets accepted you rewrite several more times...) The first draft is not the final product, and how you write it depends on what you need to get it done. Lots of authors write their stories in another order than the ...


3

So, you have a lot of flashbacks? This indeed can be confusing. Typically, this can be organized in two ways: Relevant flashbacks. Each flashback is connected to the "present" plot, either giving it a subtle (or not so subtle) push in new direction, or providing an important "reveal" or even twist. Flashback plotline. Flashbacks are ...


2

Absolutely nothing wrong with it. If Bernard Cornwell can do it with Sharpe and The Last Kingdom, you can do it with your book. It's worth including an appendix where you discuss the differences though for those of your readers who care.


2

To answer your main question. A book containing spells and rituals is a Grimoire. The term is widely used in modern Wicca and other areas.


2

For point A; Darius needs to have finished up most of what you want him to do. maybe leave a few loose ends because death isn't always convenient. For point B; You can't give the other two characters time to stand around for a few hours crying, they have to keep moving and if they stop they die. For point C; Darius sacrifices himself to save the other 2 MC, ...


2

This is a fiction novel. Other than the restrictions you put upon yourself, there is no problem in changing some historical characters, dates, etc. The limitation would probably be that you want to strictly follow historical events, or that you were afraid of an astute reader noticing that and thinking you were wrong / no longer enjoying the story (however, ...


1

Your question is very broad, but I try to answer it depending on how I interpreted it. I too, sometimes struggle with writing cultures, characters, and countries. The best tool you have is Research. In order to write about foreign traditions and people, you need to understand them first. In these pandemic times - you most likely will not be able to find and ...


1

The answers above are both good, so I'm just adding a few extra notes: It depends how important each character is to the plot and to the other character how much time and detail you should put into their first meeting. It also depends on whether or not you are simultaneously introducing the reader to these characters as well as introducing them to one ...


1

Before you read this answer, do something first; I want to find that rule book that says no small talk, set it on the ground outside, light it on fire, shoot it half a dozen times, and then put whatever is left in the garbage can. Done? Good. Continue reading. Besides grammar and spelling and general formatting rules that your English teacher probably taught ...


1

This could end very well or not, depending on how you write this. The way you leave the reader satisfied is simply how your write. I know that you want more structural and helpful advice, but that's really it. If you can write well enough to leave the reader thinking that Darius died an honorable death, you're going to have to comb through your story ...


1

How can I cue the reader to see the intended pretentious narrator bloopers, for instance that the first of two divergent descriptions of an Apple Watch as having “a small, circular face” represent bloopers on the part of an incompetent fictional narrator? You need to establish a frame - something to give the reader the context that your "incompetent ...


1

Historical Fiction, at least those works which are set in the medium to distant past (longer ago than the current age of your average reader), will be set in a world that is significantly different than the reader's own. The reader can therefore be considered naive to the details of the targeted time period. The main characters, on the other hand, are ...


1

I think you may be misunderstanding the complaints about "telling someone else's story". Every story is the story of someone other than the author, in whole or in part. The complaints come when: The author takes a writing spot from someone closer to the experience. For example, people would complain if a white writer pitched a story with a black main ...


1

Maps are common enough in books that no one will find it abnormal or something like that. In fact, I would put the map there if I were you. It will keep the reader engaged, as they will be able to tell where things are, making them not only follow the story easier, but also feel more like they're in the story.


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