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12

Let me start by saying that this question has already been answered and the answer is no. I've been writing and publishing haiku for about a decade now, so I wanted to weigh in. Western haiku writers, starting more or less in the early 1900s used the 5-7-5 syllable form in imitation of the Japanese. But because of the way the Japanese language works (it ...


5

While an English language haiku is not typically constrained to 17 syllables, there are certain traditions that it often follows. Specifically (from the Haiku Society of America's definitions page): Traditional Japanese haiku include a "season word" (kigo), a word or phrase that helps identify the season of the experience recorded in the poem, and a "...


4

No. There is a distinct pattern that is required. To wit: a Japanese poem of seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five, traditionally evoking images of the natural world. A poem in English written in the form of a haiku. Oxford Dictionaries What you presented does not fit the pattern.


3

You can try Japanese Transliteration which will take English words and *transliterate them into Hiragana, which you can hear spoken (lower right hand option). This means it will show you the Hirigana spelling that most closely approximates the sounds of the English word. You can decide how good it is by listening to the Japanese speaker pronounce the ...


3

An on is a feature of the Japanese language that does not exist in English. Counting something that does not exist makes no sense. For the same reason, whatever is written in English and called a "haiku" is not a haiku in the Japanese sense of the word. American haiku poet Cor van den Heuvel writes: A haiku is not just a pretty picture in three lines of ...


2

You use the rules of the language you are writing in, period. Haiku may be written in English, using the English rules and definitions of syllables. Japanese and English Haiku do not translate as Haiku from one language to the other but they can use the same rules in terms of syllable count. Similarly I've heard Chinese and Malaysian limericks written using ...


2

I don't see how writing an English Haiku is a problem. So you write English words on three lines with line 1 having 5 syllables, line 2 having 7, and line 3 having 5. I remember writing haikus as a kid in elementary school. I'm no linguist, but I'd think any spoken language must have syllables, so the idea of counting syllables should be applicable to almost ...


2

Or would it even be possible to create a tool to consistently determine the number of on in a language other than Japanese? No, it isn't. Or rather, it is possible to count something consistently, but if you're looking at a language like English, there is no agreement about what "on" would correspond to. As the Wikipedia article you linked to mentioned, ...


2

in the original text of ten random haikus by classical japanese poets i just checked, length varies from 11 to 19 syllables and only two had 17. just as they say in french, “il ne faut pas être plus royaliste que le roi”, you can’t be more of a haiku poet than Buson or Bashō. a haiku is more about content than form - i would say that if nature isn’t evoked ...


1

I believe if you're writing a haiku in a particular language, you stick to the smallest unit of sound heard when the language is spoken. In Japanese, this is the ooni; in English, this is the syllable.


1

Now, I'm utter bullocks at poetry, but I am learning Japanese. So allow me to (try and help by) describing how Japanese syllables work, and what Onji are meant to describe. In Japanese words are spoken in a vary per-syllable fashion, with grammar sometimes being the only thing used to define the bounds between words/sentences. Along with this, Japanese ...


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