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20

Just do the math. Although it varies by genre, from about 80,000 to 120,000 (epic fantasy with lots of world-building), 1000 a day means 80 to 120 days. So about three or four months for a first draft. About the time I take myself. Personally, I set aside 90 minutes every morning (my best time to write) to write, and use Orson Scott Card's advice: You don't ...


19

There is a distinction that needs to be drawn here: are you talking about practice that helps you improve your writing, or are you talking about the kind of practice you can put in a CV to help you get a job in journalism or something similar? If you're looking for something to put on your CV, "I write a diary" is weak. "I write a blog" is stronger, because ...


7

Let me make a parallel: Question: Does walking inside my own home counts as exercise? Answer: It depends on the mindset and the way it is performed. For exercises, it depends on what metabolic rate you can achieve during your exertion. Keeping it steady and in the optimal zone makes it an (productive) exercise. Of course every single movement counts. They ...


7

A few hours? Why, that's a good amount of time. If you sit down and write for them, you will be able to write a lot of works. Some things that may help are having a set scheduled time in which you must write -- or sit at your writing desk and do nothing -- or having a minimum daily quota, which should be longer than the amount of writing it takes you to ...


6

There are many factors that would affect whether 1000 words a day is realistic for you or not. E.g.: Do you do overtime? How long is your commute to/from work? Can you use the commute time for writing? What else do you have to do other than working? Do you have a spouse? Children? Must you do the grocery shopping, the cooking, the cleaning? How long does ...


4

Unlike writing, reading time is something that you can sneak into the rest of your day. All you really need is a book and a bit of free time. If you can sneak in four fifteen minute reading sessions a day, you've got an hour of reading done and seven hours of reading a week. If you are a reasonably fast reader, that is easily a novel a week. You can bring a ...


4

I think that my problem with thinking of this as serious writing practice is because it's already a habit of mine and it feels like cheating to accept something that I already do and don't have to actively attempt to learn. I write (and sometimes I get paid for it). To turn your diary writing into serious practice, I'd leave some blank pages after each ...


4

You found a time when you can write. Why on earth would you want to break that habit? Fix your grammatical errors in the morning. Get your ideas on paper when the Muse wants you.


4

It kind of depends on the quality of your writing. Because if you pump out 365,000 words a year, but they aren't high quality words, then it ultimately doesn't get you closer to publishing (if that is your goal; I'm assuming it is since this site is aimed at professionals). The good news is is that the longer you write, the better you will get; and 1000 ...


3

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo, NaNo) is an online challenge to write a 50,000 word novel in the 30 days of November. If you can add exactly 1,600+ words per day you can meet the goal with time to spare. (I' believe the exact number is 1,667 but to be honest I don't keep track that closely. Sometimes you write more than you set out to do, others ...


3

Do you still have a plot? Seriously. As long as you have a functioning plot it doesn't matter what you do with a trope. The reason a lot of subversions don't "work" is because they neuter the conflict of the plot. They try to be subversive just for the sake of being subversive without adding anything to the narrative. The best subversions still have a good ...


2

I'm also working on a weekly publication, and struggle with a lot of the same feelings. I think that rather than trying to address the problem head-on, what has worked for me is to have a fairly strict but reasonable writing schedule that I stick to every day. Following the Seinfeld productivity method, I got myself a giant year calendar and mark the ...


2

You're suffering from impacted arborvision: you have so much pressure on you that you can no longer see the forest for the trees. Get an editor. Ask someone else to look at your work. Let a fresh pair of eyes judge how and where you need to cut or expand.


2

In my experience there are two main types of blogs out there, topic-focused and person-focused. You're describing the latter. Person-focused blogs, which cover a range of topics and styles with the unifying theme of "interesting enough for the blog author to want to write about", seem to attract a smaller audience unless you're famous. That's ok; not ...


2

The original answer is right that there is no one single right answer. But here are a few tips: Avoid using the passive voice in favour of the active voice as much as you can. You will not believe how much this will improve your writing. Brevity is the soul of wit. Short, terse sentences carry a lot more power than long sentences with many commas. ...


2

Tell someone. The act of speaking (or writing) an idea will reinforce its memory. You can tell whoever you happen to be with. Or call someone and leave them a message. Or call yourself and leave a message (but that would fall into the methods you've already considered I'm sure). If you can only tell yourself, do it, just say it out loud. If you're ...


2

There's the Memory Palaces method, which dates back to antiquity. There are whole books written about it, but here's a much simplified version: Imagine you are standing on a street. Stretched out in front of you are ten objects, representing the ten numbers from one to ten. One is a giant bun. Two is a shoe. Three is a bee, and so forth. To remember ...


2

You're confusing words with time Different writers have different natural paces. Trying to write slower than your natural pace will make you miserable. Trying to write faster than your natural pace will produce shoddy writing. And make you miserable. That said, your initial writing speed will probably be slower than your final speed. So it's good to ...


2

That's about four pages per day, which is ambitious but fully attainable for a part-time writer, and is indeed a good pace to complete a first draft in less than a year. More importantly, it sounds like it's working for you, which is really the more crucial question. Keep in mind you can adjust your pace later if it ever is NOT working for you. But if you'...


2

Yes this is a great exercise. That's exactly what Stephen King advises in his audio book "On writing". He explains that, in order to improve you have to practice, but also to maintain your level and 1000 words a day is the good level. This way of doing work in other fields, by the way. Whatever content it produces, you should commit to that.


1

Good writing habits depend on the style of writing you're involved in. You'll find that the same author writing different materials could have different writing habits. Depending on the kind of training the writer has and the self discipline it would take to play the part of the ______ writer, the writer can use similitudes or not, use metaphors or not, ...


1

I was cleaning the barn one afternoon and the first four lines of a ballad came to me. I repeated them, many times, letting it grow longer until I had the entire piece, which I continued to repeat. By the time I got to pen and paper, I had 210 lines memorized. It was very old school. On another occasion, I was working when a plot idea came and I memorized ...


1

I had a similar experience with movies. Watching movies was my favorite hobby, then it was entirely ruined when I watched the second Hobbit movie. I found it so bad that it ruined everything that I watched for a year. I constantly picked holes in the plot, relationships, acting, everything. Ironically enough it was the third Hobbit movie that fixed this ...


1

I experience this all the time, though I don't see it as a bad thing. I embrace it as an opportunity to learn more. If I want to experience someting without analyzing it, I try listening to it on audiobook, or reading it to music. Not music with words. Orchestral music. Since I usually read action/adventure books, I resort to movie soundtracks. These help to ...


1

To add on to Psicofrenia's excellent answer: Simply put, a writer writes. All the time. If you're not at your desk, you're still writing in your head. The notebook gives you somewhere to put your thoughts for later perusal. So if you're sitting at a subway station waiting for the train on the way to work, you may observe two really interesting people ...


1

Basically the idea is to take notes. Supposedly, a writer is always receiving insights of creativity and new ideas. If you have a notebook, you can write them down and not forget even if you are in the middle of street or something like that. The other function of the notebook is to collect interesting things. If you know how to draw and cross a interesting ...


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