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Your narrator can be a character in the book --for instance, Nick, in The Great Gatsby. In that case, he or she can simply interact with other characters as any other character would do. Your narrator can also be the disembodied voice of the author. If the narrator interacts with the characters in that second case, you are writing experimental metafiction. ...


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The biggest difficulty with this idea is that from the moment the narrator calls a character me/I/myself, the reader will see the character and the narrator as the same person, and they won't stop seeing it that way unless you start a new chapter that refers to a different character in the first person (and are very careful to do this without making the ...


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I'm in agreement with Amadeus here. It's just not a technique that is going to work. I'm trying to think of an exception, and I can't. Already you're messing with things by having the 1st person narration know what's in Jason's head. Since the main character is telling this part of the story, s/he shouldn't know what Jason is thinking of and it makes ...


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Be consistent. It can be a narrative technique where the main character is first person and the others are third person. This is useful for if you want to hide things from the reader. The main character will have their flawed perception, and the third person view can be used to explain how characters in the other parts of the story are progressing. It can ...


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The only real issue with using 1st-p is that the narrator (assuming the MC/protag is also the VC) can't know what they don't experience, or so we are told. So they can't narrate scenes they were not present for, unless that is used as a frame story. IOW, a character can relate a story to them, which they repeat to us, either in dialog or narration. But you ...


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