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Undoubtedly, no structures are banned, so to speak, from the English lanuage. It is all a matter of convenience and desired outcome. Sure, as a general rule, to quote @Zan700 from the comments, one tends to avoid repeating words with similar roots within a paragraph, let alone one sentence. This is to avoid sounding monotonous, of course, and unintelligible -...


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“A well-placed hyphen can lend writing c-l-a-r-i-t-y” ... Also see dashes and spelling compound words with or without hyphens. ... It produces a sudden jolt of emphasis, an abrupt pause that draws a dramatic halt to the rhythm ... Intended for the eye rather than the ear, it functions without personality, style, or rhythmic impact.


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In the vast majority of cases, you will never hyphenate an adverb-adjective phrase in the way you're describing. In modern writing, it would be considered clunky and displeasing, and give your writing an archaic look. The practice of hyphenating adverb phrases likely originates from phrases like "two-word" or "one-note" or "close-...


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As you suspected, in the first sentence it's ambiguous who is eating the oranges - is it the men or is it the deer? The comma in the second sentence makes it clear that it's not the deer and, therefore, must be the men. I'm not sure about "greatly" altering the meaning of the sentence, but it definitely does clarify the meaning of the sentence. I ...


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Both the simple present and the present continuous sound a bit off combined with simple past in that way. Also, keep may not be the best verb to use, holding, clinging to, grabbing, riding, surfing etc. may be better. Difficult to say what would sound better without knowing the preceding paragraph, but maybe use past continuous: "They were holding the ...


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