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1

Periods and other punctuation marks being placed inside of quotation marks is a typographical convention. "Full stop." If you do it differently, it will stand out, and not in a good way. If you want your writing to be published, follow the conventions and style rules of the publisher, institution or organization. This is not about programming ...


-2

English dept profs will likely say no, but I ignore them and do what is logical. I put the period after the punctuation you showed. And I still put two periods after a sentence to make it easier to read. The saving of removing one space per sentence is not worth the difficulty in reading especially with so many fonts using a tiny period; they are just too ...


0

I don't think this usage is grammatically incorrect, though it may not be best practices. But it's easily fixed. You can merge the parentheticals, like so: ..rather than visiting flowers that were in ‘same scent’ group (same scent and different colour to the rewarding flower group. See Figure 1). or remove the first: ..rather than visiting flowers that ...


12

No. And particularly not in your example of a list of historical periods, in which the obvious listing would be in chronological order. Alphabetical order would be perverse! In most other cases, it would be merely unnecessary. Also, you misunderstand what the 'Oxford comma' is. In 'The late Jurassic periods are Kimmeridgian, Oxfordian, and Tithonian.' ...


6

There's nothing right or wrong with alphabetical order for nouns. Like a lot of English, there's no explicit rule but there's a way that sounds best. It often depends on what the items are. If history is involved, chronological order makes sense. If they're items you'd find on the shelf at an auto parts store, sorting by function helps the reader find them. ...


19

No. The time periods would be better sorted in order they occurred instead of alphabetical. If not time related then use other factors such as size that has more meaning than their first letters.


52

There's no rule about the order of listed elements, so this is not a question of grammar, but of style. There are a few different approaches you could take: An alphabetical order might make it easier for readers to remember the elements. (However, if it's about ease of memorisation, a better approach might be to see if one particular order creates a ...


4

"Somehow" is an adverb. It is usually placed close to the verb it is describing and can be used without commas as a regular adverb. Your sentence above doesn't require commas. Entering the house, she realized that somehow inside was worse. This isn't a "rule," but it's fairly common to see "somehow" used at the beginning or ...


0

When did grammar rules and 'phrase structure' rules become the same? The correct answer is no, a writer does not have to follow perfect English per some English dept or professor, nor from any handbook that has no official status and of which there are many that do not all agree. What the writer needs to do is be clear to the reader. And since you ...


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