New answers tagged

3

Some readers won't be particularly bothered but others will be seriously put off. You may well slide a substantial number of mistakes past the average reader without them even noticing. But it's doubtful that you've gained anything in the process, and if for every ten readers who doesn't notice there's one who bad mouths your work to others because they did ...


1

Assuming you are talking about prose and not actually speaking, as long as the meaning of the sentence is absolutely clear, then grammar and syntax are less important. But, grammar rules around tense and pronouns exists to make communication clear. So, specifically tensing, it is pretty important to get it right when writing, because there are patterns of ...


2

Writing thought, or, as it's often called, internal emotion, depends on the POV and how deep it is. I'm most familiar with pretty deep POV (one person per scene where the narrator and the POV person is the same), but using an omnipotent third-person POV (the narrator sees all including people's thoughts, even several in the same scene) I think using italics ...


4

There are two general conventions, following from how dialog is handled. Like Direct Speech, dialog spoken by the character, Direct Thought in the present tense, regardless of the tense of the story, but the text is italicized and not quoted. Gandalf said, "You shall not pass!" Bobby, the Balrog, chuckled to himself. Ok, Boomer Indirect thought ...


0

Since you have used a colon in the first sentence, you can use a semi-colon after each number instead of a comma, and it would then be acceptable to drop the 'and' at the end of your sentence.


1

I don't think 'sometimes writer' is correct. The final S is the problem. Compare 'once upon a time' with 'once upon a times'. 'Sometime writer' means at some time I have been/am a writer. If there is no reason to ditch 'occasional' then I'd stick with that if that is an accurate description of bursts of creativity.


1

This is a personal take on the question (nothing even remotely authoritative), but I think the three usages mean slightly different things. I take a description of an individual as an "occasional writer" to mean that they undertake many actions or activities, one of which is writing. A manager of a department might have to write descriptions of ...


1

Grammatically? Yes, it's fine. Wikipedia says: In poetry, enjambment (/ɛnˈdʒæmbmənt/ or /ɛnˈdʒæmmənt/; from the French enjambement) is incomplete syntax at the end of a line; the meaning runs over from one poetic line to the next, without terminal punctuation. Lines without enjambment are end-stopped. Basically, enjambment means to end the line with no or ...


2

English IS confusing... ... but it also has a hundred ways to do everything, at least half of which are technically correct. I'd state this completely differently, but maybe that won't fit your needs. I'd likely go with something more like: Today, my parents have bachelor's degrees and stable employment. When I was growing up, however, it was a very ...


0

"Ok" or any variant feels like a common everyday speech, and thus, it's not adapted to writing/reading, especially for professional quality work. It could of course be used in dialogue as explained above, but it would still look very ordinary and fill the sentences of words that don't serve a big purpose. You could illustrate the agreement of one ...


0

Ok so neither of them sound right. if you were to write ¨Not as educated as¨, that would be better. Hope this helps. Also keep Employed the way it is, Employment doesn't sound right either.


0

OK and Okay are always in speech. Personally I'm 100% OK with OK. Every reader can read it. (I also use Lunch not Luncheon.) In minutes of meetings, where a report is summarised then OK is fine. 'Fred reported the Wafflers were OK with the Boxjangles' is a concise and accurate report. If there was a genuine use in a technical report for alright/OK then ...


1

I believe that this is a matter of style. Some presctiptivist grammar texts used to insist that the "and" (or other con junction) before the final list item was required. That view is, I think, now out of date. However, it is my view that such sentences tend to flow better and are clearer with the "and" included.


6

"OK" is definitely not used in professional writing, with the obvious exception being for character dialogue in fiction when it might make sense in the moment. Usually, though, it comes across like a texting phrase, similar to LOL or ROFL, which is a tone that you don't generally want in a novel. "OK," she said, and put the phone down. &...


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