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Writing an article (or book) in somebody else's name is called "ghostwriting". Typically ghost writers agree under contract to remain anonymous. If you have no such agreement with your sister, and your sister will not get into any trouble if anybody learns she did not write the articles herself (and they may, once you start making it public by telling ...


6

Based on all the info in your question: almost nowhere. You aren't going to get somebody to write books based on your ideas/guidance, with you listed as the main (or only) author [definition of ghostwriter], unless you are famous or have deep pockets (i.e., hefty payment up-front). The lone exception might be the person who posted a question on here about ...


4

Should I story board/outline the novel and hand it over to a ghost writer directly to write from scratch? Or should I write a "bad" first draft and hire an editor to rewrite it, ideally in a more compelling manner. That rumble in the distance is the sound of a thousand plotters and pantsers, marching towards this thread to wage war on each other. ...


3

My advice? Take the plunge, and do the best that you can. Don't assume that because you're used to writing scripts that you can't layer in the description. Just picture in your head the scene and describe it. Then, higher a developmental or someone else to help fix it. Don't send it to a ghost writer. I've written with quite a bit of economy of description, ...


2

In wikipedia I read that Cary Elwes co-wrote a screenplay. I imagine that when you co-write a screenplay, the work might be just as collaborative, i.e. non-independent, as when you publish a book with your byline along with a "with" byline. So it seems quite plausible that the ghost writer / co-writer of the Bride book played a substantial role. But I don't ...


2

Most writers (though check yourself for variance) can comfortably write about 500 words an hour. If one adds in research, edits and revisions; your effective words-per-hour would end up at about 80-120 depending. This allows you to take a target hourly rate and convert it to cost per word. What a fair hourly rate is depends on your experience, location, and ...


2

Writing for the screen is not the same as writing a novel. However, there are many similarities. For example, you have to be prepared actually write rather than just talk about it, you have to edit what you have written, dialogue has to sound realistic, characters have to be three-dimensional, there has to be conflict, etc. If I was you, I would start with ...


2

Always ask for what you want. If you are confident in your skills and your portfolio backs up your work, people will not have an issue with giving you that money. Just like with any job interview, you always ask high and then negotiate down to what you actually want. If you start with what you want, you will get that at most. There is no issue with at the ...


1

I don't have a lot Scrivener-specific experience. You can, subject to being careful not to both edit the same file at the same time. I don't think Scrivener has file locking/version control that way for collaboration (I'm not 100% sure about that). You shouldn't do it for 2 reasons 1. Version Control How do you know what you've changed and maybe you ...


1

Well, I know Dean Wesley Smith is a successful author, with more than 20 million books in print, and he's done a fair amount of ghostwriting in his career. (He doesn't recommend it, IIRC.) I think his wife, Kristine Kathryn Rusch has done the same, and she's an award-winning author and editor. Both of them have LONG careers as writers. Both of them are ...


1

I know K.A. Applegate was a Ghostwriter for "The Babysitters' Club" Series before she went on to write her own massively popular series Animorphs (which was the number one book series among Elementary and Middle School readers until unseated by Harry Potter). Her husband was a silent author (he helped write books but was never credited) and had his own ...


1

I recently read an article about creating a writing portfolio which explained your situation perfectly. It suggested using live links towards the original content to avoid any duplicate content and SEO penalties. Perhaps, this is something to consider as I imagine the SM-agency will be pretty SEO savvy to know if you've published their content anywhere on ...


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