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2

As was already pointed out in a comment, I am pretty sure that works in most genres. Two things I would keep in mind: Watch genre expectations: e.g. in Romance especially (where a good ending is kind of expected I've heard) or Children's, as well as YA if you overdo it, this might be a problem. Integrate it into the marketing: it might not be wise to have a ...


1

Torture Porn has a certain revelling tone to it, it enjoys the specifics for no other reason than, as Amadeus put it, its own sake. Instead of using torture as a device to show, say, that someone is going above and beyond to acquire some information, or vice versa, enduring above and beyond to keep some information contained, they instead just go 'cyoar, ...


1

You almost have to assign your book a genre in order to describe it to an agent or publisher; the publisher will likely make the final determination of what genre they assign internally, and this can differ from publisher to publisher. As said before, genre is a marketing tool, it helps agents know which publishers to approach, and publishers know how to ...


2

I read this really good definition by Chris Sunami: Genre should be seen largely as a way of connecting a writer with the audience most likely to enjoy his or her book based on elements shared with other books. I read it about 2 minutes ago here: What is the most important characteristic of New Weird as a genre?. So if you're not sure what to call your ...


2

I believe your first two definitions are essentially in agreement. The most important characteristic of the "New Weird" is a fantasy story set in a fantasy world, where traditional fantasy tropes and ideas are subverted and replaced with something less neat and tidy and more complicated and unsettling. This new weird approach to fantasy might also be used ...


15

Genre should be seen largely as a way of connecting a writer with the audience most likely to enjoy his or her book based on elements shared with other books. It isn't an exact science, and for this, a hybrid subgenre, you'll be looking for a signature combination of traits, rather than a single defining one. I'm not previously familiar with the label "...


5

If 'new weird' is a reference to the Weird Tales of the likes of HP Lovecraft and other writings in the Cthulhu Mythos, I would imagine the primary trait of New Weird would be application of the fantastical in a way that implies it's incomprehensible, malevolent, unknowable and dangerous, rather than empowering, whimsical, et cetera.


3

Your publisher will decide where to file your book, and it's largely a marketing decision. In the USA, books are often shunted into YA if they can possibly fit there because it's a healthy market. Also schools will often pick up or promote YA books --even ones that are a bit edgy --because they're trying to get kids to read. (Also for this reason, it may ...


6

Young adult vs adult fiction isn't about the age of the characters (though that usually does vary too), it's about the age of your readers. If you're writing for adults, then write for adults and pitch your work that way to publishers, agents, and potential customers. If you use a traditional publisher, they might want to classify your book as young adult, ...


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