Hot answers tagged

6

It's called Alt-History and it's not something new. Just make sure that if you write it over a longer time frame (like if your story starts in the 30's and goes up to the 70's) that it will be a different 70's then we had due tot he changes you made in the 30's. Most common ones are Alt histories about WW1 and WW2 where the Central Powers or the Axis got a ...


6

Science Fantasy: I think your genre falls into a rather mushy category know as science fantasy. Sometimes this is called "soft" sci fi. While this relies on a scientific basis for the story, elements either do not conform to conventional science or have additional fantastic elements not reflective of science. A publisher might have a different ...


3

This is slice of life, a storytelling technique that depicts a period of time without a conventional narrative or plotline, and potentially without an identifiable protagonist. It's relatively uncommon in fiction, but relatively common in documentaries, although those are often really a series of little mini-stories, each with their own protagonist. At the ...


3

If you're writing about real people and real events, that's "non-fiction"/"journalism". If you write it in the style of a novel, it's "creative non-fiction". If you're writing about made-up people in real events, that's "historical fiction." If you're writing about made-up people in made-up events in the real world, ...


2

To find out if your novel is sci-fi vs. fantasy, we must establish the rules of the world your characters live in (even when the story has multiple worlds). If the rules/laws of the world are founded in mystical objects not created by man himself but by a higher being (can be evil, holy, good, bad, both, etc...), then your main genre is fantasy. If the ...


2

The problem with this approach is that it confuses the reader. The genre label is a signal to the reader that this story is one of those type of stories. A reader who is looking for a comfortable reading experience picks a story labeled as a mystery in the expectation that it contains all of the elements of a mystery. There may be some other elements but ...


1

If your story is in the USA in the past it will be historical fiction. No doubt there is evidence of a number of large tsunamis in the present USA in the past, but if your story happens after the USA was founded the number will be smaller. If your story is supposed to happen more or less in the present it will be contemporary fiction. Obviously, a tsunami, ...


1

The suffix "-punk" has come to mean "uses this level of technology." A setting with cars probably is either "dieselpunk" -- technology level about that between the two world wars -- or "atompunk" -- technology level from WWII to about the 1970s. Neither term is as common in usage as cyberpunk or steampunk. (More types ...


1

YOu can also write a story about someone travelling in time to some past era and interacting with historical or legendary persons. One of the earliest examples is Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889). Examples by mainstream authors include The Sense of the Past, 1917, by Henry James, a partial inspiration for the play Berkeley ...


1

According to WikiDiff: "As nouns, the difference between legend and epic is that legend is a story of unknown origin describing plausible but extraordinary past events while epic is an extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a deity or demigod (heroic epic) or other legendary or traditional hero." ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible