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American writer Marge Piercy proposed a new article, "per" (related to person) for speaking about all people regardless of gender. As in, "I saw per at the park today. I waved but I don't think per saw me."


-4

Mathematician Michael Spivak says 'e' for he/she. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spivak_pronoun Prepare to downvote me. I will not directly use people's preferred pronouns. I will use e/h/h and thereby indirectly use anyone's preferred pronouns, and therefore I am never wrong. if you want she and i say e, then you cannot disprove that i said she. of course, i ...


5

"If not, is the modern English language is going toward inventing such a pronoun?" Up until the mid-20th century English used the generic 'he' to refer to both genders. Language is defined by usage - if you frequently and consistently use 'he' generically, people will come to interpret it generically. Rather than evolving a new pronoun, English ...


1

There have been several attempts to coin one, including e/em/eir, xe/xem/xir, sie/hem/hir and ze/zem/zir, along with many other variations. Some of these have been around for more than a century, but none has caught on and become standard English. Singular they has, as others have mentioned. You will also sometimes see “she/he,” “s/he,” “his or her,” or ...


1

A different sort of idea: This is not official English, but I have a thought, and don't downvote it just because it's not official. Alternate pronouns are new territory linguistically. I'm interested in feedback more than votes, so feel free to leave a comment on your opinion. I would not recommend alternate pronouns for a routine story, as it would be a ...


45

"They" is typically the English pronoun you would use here. It is a generally accepted, gender-neutral pronoun that has been in usage for centuries to refer to any of the following: A group of people that may contain multiple genders ("They went to the Silicon Valley conference yesterday."). This differs from other languages like Spanish,...


8

You are looking for "they" (which can be used as singular or as plural).


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