5

I'm also a big FOSS supporter, and I detest using Microsoft products for many reasons. That said, here's a fairly hardnosed take on the subject, from Charles Stross, a very successful author and sound thinker - who is also a FOSS advocate: Why Microsoft Word Must Die MS made what seems like an intensely stupid engineering decision about visual formatting: ...


4

If you do hire the editor, I wouldn't mention it to your prospective publishers. There are probably some who don't care, but to some it's seen as a bit of an amateur move - the general theory is that an author should be able to get their work to a high enough level to attract a publisher on their own, and then work with the publisher's editor. There's also ...


4

There is no "usual" rate because writing skills are a very wide spectrum ranging from "kid out of high school who thinks they are a writer because their Dragonball fanfic got over 2000 views" and "world renowned bestseller author whose name alone guarantees millions of readers". Think about how much you consider your writing services worth per hour. While ...


4

...are there some opportunities where one could profit from his/her writing skills? Yes indeed, there are many opportunities - but it comes down to which writing skills you have, and how well you can sell what you have to offer. As a professional I use a wide range of skills depending on the kind of job I'm doing: expertise in grammar and orthography are ...


3

They're usually just called essays. Though in our modern age we often use names related to the platform. So on a blog, they're posts or blog posts. As Zeiss Ikon points out, in a newspaper, they're called opinion pieces. If they're written by newspaper staff, they're editorials. In a magazine, they're articles. Chances are though you'll find work by ...


3

I'm used to seeing them called "opinion pieces" when they run in a print newspaper. Very possible that term could be out of date, however (as print newspapers more and more seem to be). In some cases, you might also be writing "reviews" -- especially if you are specifically writing about a single piece of art, performance, or writing ("book review", "movie ...


3

I think this is VERY opinion based due to the situation, so here are my opinions. First, I agree with @Cyn, put the deal in writing and in detail and signed and dated. Contracts are simple, and if either the best or worst happens, you will want to refer to what you agreed upon to start, before the work went to hell or broke records. Personally, I would not ...


3

Are you in the US? A primary model here is "I might be interested in you as long as you might have something I can use. I'll give you attention as long as it costs me nothing." In other words, if you are a high school junior in the states, every college wants you to apply, but many lose interest once your application is in. If you apply for a job in the ...


3

I think the best way to evaluate a freelance site is the same as evaluating any other business: Talk with the people who've worked with them before and see what they think about them, search around for other references to them to see what negative comments they have, and check their local Better Business Bureau for comments. Don't be afraid to ask writers ...


3

I don't know what publishers like and don't like, but when you submit work, it should be as clean as it can be. So absolutely edit it many times yourself, have your readers and your writing group edit it, hire an editor. I can't imagine a publisher would care who edited your manuscript, as long as it's edited well.


3

I think I'll second @KateS on a lot of what she says. I don't know if hiring an editor for submission or querying is beneficial. And even if your friend wouldn't charge you much, Kate's also right in that you shouldn't put that forward in any of your query submissions. As an alternative to potentially going into debt on the book before submission, maybe you ...


2

The easiest way to do this is to create a profile on a site such as Elance. Once you've done so, you can immediately begin bidding on jobs from clients around the world. This is where I got my start as a freelance writer after college and my first job was for a start-up in Singapore. However, the vast majority of the jobs posted on these sites offer very ...


2

It's simple really. Write about anything that interests you Write something, proof, rewrite repeat. Submit wait, wait, wait, deal with rejection. Start over if you repeat this process while writing something that matters to you. It will eventually pay off. At this point you can go back through all your rejected, non-time-sensitive material. Proofread, ...


2

Without seeing your articles, we can only guess. My guess is that you don't bring anything new and exciting to the table. I am an atheist and will be one as long as I can think rationally (and when that stops, I don't think that person is "me" anymore, since my rationality is central to my persona). But when I read atheists, I hear the same old arguments, ...


2

You may have had a chance to look at the book by now, but just in case... The books are put out by Writer's Digest and there are a series of them put out annually (Poet's Market, Writer's Market, and others). These list journals, publishers, contests, conferences, etc. and their information as they pertain to a writer trying to market his or her work. As an ...


2

I've heard them called 'personal essays' when we were assigned them in class. For newspapers they're usually called opinion pieces though, and shorter. As Zeiss Ikon said, if you're mainly talking about a book/movie it's a review, though if you just use the media as a jumping of piece for your thoughts about a subject it's probably still a personal essay.


2

Because you posted this question in the Writers Stack Exchange, and the company promotes/recommends activities, it seems likely that the internship involves writing. As an intern, you will shine if you accomplish the following: Take the initiative to research information, solve problems, and find answers to questions. Listen well to instructions, and ...


2

Something in the range of $50/hour (assuming US dollars within the US or the equivalent in industrial countries) is reasonable for professionals. It's about what artists charge to do illustrations and the like. Some charge more, some charge less. My guess is anything from $20-70/hour is what people might charge, but it really depends. I have not seen ...


2

Everyone starts as a newbie, and there's no requirement of a writing degree to be a professional writer. However, you'll likely need to start at the bottom and work your way up, like the majority of other people. Phase I: Write articles for free (or little compensation) for local news outlets, guest posts on blogs and content aggregators like Medium. Phase ...


2

It really is not that uncommon in an online world to use a pseudonym. You're doing it right now, in fact. If you feel it is important to get settled early, though; still don't mention in the initial cold pitch. It is presumptuous, and it really does not relate to the content you are pitching, hence distracting from it. Normally, you'd enter some sort of ...


1

As with any art form, the creative, personally fulfilling writing is what everyone wants to do --only the best make money at it, and there's a glut of aspiring hopefuls. The writing that consistently makes money is functional writing that fulfills some kind of ongoing need. Here are some examples of that kind of writing: Niche reference materials: If ...


1

You can profit from your writing, but it will be harder to. Small publishers are more hesitant to publish your writing, and the bigger ones are too preoccupied (from my experience). If a book you write is something that strikes close to the publisher's heart or is a book they lavish in great amounts, your book will be more likely to be published faster (and ...


1

Your best bet is to build from your previous experience working for magazines and journals by submitting to ones that pay. In addition to the big, general interest publications, there are a lot of niche publications, some of which have healthy budgets. If you're a good researcher, you might be able to make yourself a quasi-expert in a niche area, or at ...


1

A good possible place to start is this article at searchenginewatch.com where they discuss how much a corporation should reasonably spend for search engine optimization. The general timing there (if you do the math) seems to be somewhere between 7 hours on the low end and 16 hours on the high end.


1

In most technology books, a chapter tackles a single subject in depth. For example, "looping" in a language, the FOR loop; WHILE loop, DO WHILE, DO UNTIL, etc. In beginner books, syntax and the reason for it are discussed. What is the importance of the semi-colon in C, or the curly braces {}? What is a FUNCTION in C? What is a SUBROUTINE? What is a MACRO? ...


1

One of the inherent challenges you will face in converting a serialized approach to information (blog, published articles etc) into a book is that episodic articles or blogs are, or should be, largely self-contained. That is, each article or blog post can stand on its own as a piece of writing - though concepts touched on in a previous article or post may ...


1

In the comments you mentioned that you want to write a blog about differenct technologies, for example about different programming languages, and are having problems with how you want to structure the chapters, that are represented by your blog posts. Here comes the frame challenge: you are not writing a book and therefore you are not writing chapters - you ...


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