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0

When it comes to actually writing the signer's line, I tend to write them between apostrophes. I find it easier and a little more visually appealing than italics, but still allows the reader to differentiate the two languages. I more commonly save the italicization for internal thoughts. 'I wish I could go to the park.' vs. I wish I could go to the park.


4

It's fine to use action to insert a beat in the dialogue, or just as a change of pace from tags. But you must separate out each person's actions (whether it's speech, thought, or something else) in to a new paragraph. What you wrote isn't clear. Amadeus' version is perfectly good. How you format it is up to you and it will depend on the sentence or two ...


3

You format it with tags, it won't interrupt the flow. "What?!" Marcia said. I laughed, giving her a minute to process my words. "You're getting married?" she said. "I never thought I'd see the day!"


2

What's interesting is writing for the "eye" vs "ear" -- for example, in the comic books, Wonder Woman is often called, both in dialog and captions, "WW" (a savings of 10 characters) -- but to SAY "doubleyou-doubleyou" is longer than Wonder Woman -- 6 syllables compared to 4. Similarly "World Wide Web" "WWW" "dubdubdub" (save 12 characters, but go from 3 ...


8

AM and FBI are not abbreviations, they are acronyms. We know to pronounce them letter by letter because they are fully capitalized. In some cases, they also have periods after each letter (with no spaces). Never ever sound them out (unless it's to show the character is saying them wrong). "It's 4 AM," she said. Note I fixed the punctuation and changed ...


0

I read somewhere that sounds do not need to always be in caps, but rather only sounds which will add to the experience of reading the script, as if you were watching the film. In other words, it's a stylistic choice. However, I did previously read that all sounds should be in caps, so possibly that is outdated?


2

I'm going to focus solely on the How to convert dialogue in to paragraph? question. There isn't one technique but several that should be used together. Here's four that seem to be the most important IMHO. Mention actions in between dialogues. Maybe Anna flopped down onto the coach, thus showing she was tired. Maybe John dropped his phone with a low curse ...


4

First of all, what do you mean by "taking inspiration from a movie"? If you mean copying the dialogue from a movie line for line, you're not allowed to do that. That's plagiarism. I would also question your statement regarding "having no experience with married life". You might not be married yourself, but what about your parents? Your parents' friends? ...


1

The short answer is, you can do this any way you want. But how you do it will set the tone for the story. If you write it in a log format, it will bring to mind military experiences or a formal log for a job (like a medical record). For example, here is a World War II era U.S. Naval log. The starting location is given for each day and each entry has the ...


2

If you're doing a time stamp (i.e. no one is narrating the time, but each chapter is chronologically ordered but not in a linear way (i.e. flashbacks, or chapter 1 and chapter 2 starting at the same moment in time) or you are depicting actions happening in different parts of the world and time zones are involved, Military time is usually used to distinguish ...


1

It kind of depends, to my way of thinking at least, on who the narrator of the tale is; if they are a disembodied third person POV then it's more or less authors choice, pick something you like and stick with it consistently. If, on the other hand, you're using a character from the narrative as the storyteller then you have to decide how your character ...


6

Depends. If it's a one-off indication, you should introduce it as prose: "It was 9 P.M. on a Sunday in Los Angeles..." But I assume that's not the case, maybe you're writing a thriller, and you're going to point out the changes in location explicitly multiple times during narration, like X-Files does. If that's the case, then I would introduce the change ...


1

I have not been able to find any suitable Markup, so I started coding it myself. A very preliminary version is available on GitLab. Any feedback would be VERY welcome.


2

I think the weirdness you're encountering is that you're using technical speak to convey something to the user who doesn't need to know that. To you this is a tab. While many (most?) people who use computers are familiar with tabs, they probably won't think of their spouse or child as a tab. So use whatever term the program uses for each person (taking ...


2

I'd imitate the style of stack traces. Go from most generic to most specific, provide as many details as possible, and most importantly, try to suggest a solution!. A "maybe you meant..." prompt, or something. The user will appreciate it. You can do something like: Error: invalid data has been provided. Location: Inside window titled: John Doe ...


2

Line breaks are used in addition to indents in many novels. They indicate a substantial time gap or a complete change of subject or setting. They are a bit like a chapter break. Usually, text after a line break is not indented.


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