46

Visually distinguishing a character's dialogue is not a bad idea. Sir Terry Pratchett used this tool quite a lot. Most notably, his Death spoke in ALL CAPS, including small caps when needed. (Small caps make reading significantly easier than just all caps.) There was also a special font used for the Golems' speech in Feet of Clay, a character in The Amazing ...


20

It sounds like the divisions emerged organically and intrinsically from the story – that's how it should be. Don't worry that some are long and some are short. That's not a flaw. Forcing the story to fit a rigid, arbitrary amount of pages – like a screenplay that must introduce pre-requisite conflicts at "percentages" of running time to fit cinema turnover ...


19

I agree that the right-justified text blocks are ugly as heck. I'd recommend italics for non-English and a non-quotation punctuation mark for telepathic dialogue. Mostly it's a matter of deciding what standard looks best for you and making sure the reader understands. As an example, here's what mine looks like: Normal English dialogue - no italics: "What ...


17

Assuming you aren't self-publishing, all concerns about the font-size and typography belong to the final publisher (unless you're playing fancy games with fonts, which is rare, and probably not a good idea for most authors). Instead of worrying about pages, you should focus on word count. 50,000 is generally considered the bare minimum for a viable novel (...


14

Typically, in a prose novel, you would describe the brochure, not reproduce it. After patiently listening to my story, she pulled out a resort brochure titled Transformation Intensive Programme, and pointing out with the pen in her hand she said; “Here, this one looks like something interesting for you." It cost £1500! It would be possible to ...


13

Besides Death in the books of Sir Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (10 Doctors and a Professor omitted), there are lots of precedents for special font or alignment for various usages. The Bible In contrast to some modern prints (see below), the 42-line Gutenberg Bible in Latin of 1454 (part 1) (part 2) uses the same font for everything and no special ...


12

Behold! The Mighty Ellipses! The demon...she? he?...gestured towards the supply wagons. Ultimately, it's a matter of personal style. Dashes, parentheses, ellipses are all correct. Part of the reason I prefer ellipses here is, as Amadeus points out, the gender ponderings aren't really an interruption. It's an aside. The narrator's mind is wandering. ...


12

Write it as it is. When you write dialogue, you don't write it up as formal English (or another language). You write what the characters say. If someone squeals or rolls their eyes or starts choking, you'd narrate that as well. Written communication is similar to speech in that what's said is said and that's how you report it (after having created it of ...


11

This is how Tolkien solves a similar problem in The Lord of the Rings: ENT. When Spring unfolds the beechen leaf, and sap is in the bough; When light is on the wild-wood stream, and wind is on the brow; When stride is long, and breath is deep, and keen the mountain-air, Come back to me! Come back to me, and say my land is fair! ENTWIFE. ...


8

Spoken Words Given that you are writing in English, and the majority of the time your Orcs are speaking to each other in Orcish (but translated to English for the reader), then the best plan I believe is to treat both spoken Orcish and English the same, like normal dialog, and only convey, if needed, that one or the other is being spoken as relevant to the ...


8

To me, the answer has always been pretty clear: fifty pages that happen to be double-spaced, i.e. an amount that would be about 25 otherwise. What would be really confusing is if they expected people to know they really wanted 100. And such page-based requests are similar in practice with the word or chapter counts I've seen elsewhere.


8

Short answer: break where it makes sense. Some points at which breaks are traditionally made or ways to define breaks include: change of site, the place the action is taking place changes. change in POV character, someone different starts telling the narrative. change in auxiliary characters, the people the narrator is interacting with changes. The actual ...


8

AM and FBI are not abbreviations, they are acronyms. We know to pronounce them letter by letter because they are fully capitalized. In some cases, they also have periods after each letter (with no spaces). Never ever sound them out (unless it's to show the character is saying them wrong). "It's 4 AM," she said. Note I fixed the punctuation and changed ...


8

I wouldn't recommend this. Anything that appears in quotation marks is meant to be taken literally. When I first read your example, my first thought was that Celine was talking - and actually saying the words "Bang, bang, bang, pow." This approach is likely to confuse the reader. A common alternative is to use italics instead: Bang! Bang! Bang! Pow! ...


7

Firstly, don't get disheartened. Writing is a skill that takes practice and the more you do it, the better you will get. You may have a longer road that some if your ADHD makes it difficult to concentrate on complete sentences? But even if that's so, don't let that discourage you. It's not a race, you may just take a bit longer to complete a project. If I ...


7

Depends. If it's a one-off indication, you should introduce it as prose: "It was 9 P.M. on a Sunday in Los Angeles..." But I assume that's not the case, maybe you're writing a thriller, and you're going to point out the changes in location explicitly multiple times during narration, like X-Files does. If that's the case, then I would introduce the change ...


6

Some authors use italics to indicate telepathy. Depending on formatting alone could get lost in publication if they don’t understand why you have justified your text. Consistency is key. If some Orcs are bilingual but no humans are, any Orc speaking to a human would be speaking English. Establish it early on. Perhaps Orcish has sounds that are very ...


5

This answer is current as of Scrivener 3 You have a couple of options/features to view your outline: 1. Outline View While selecting a folder or a text file in the binder, go to view → outline. On MacOS this is simply achieved by pressing ⌘ + 3. Here is a snapshot I created using a template: 2. Table Of Content If what you are looking for is more ...


5

I don't know if this is an answer, but answers shouldn't be in comments, so I'll take a gamble. In college, I took as a humanity "Mideval English Literature." Apparently, mid- dle and old English followed this practice to the extreme and with poor judgem- ent even in cases when it wasn't used to the extreme. I seem to recall our pro- fessor commented ...


5

There are a few points to balance with an issue like this. What is the tone and style of the work? Does the use of footnotes aid in reinforcing the tone and style. [If the main character is technical, and the whole piece has a fairly technical tone and air to it, then the use of footnotes might actually serve as a means of reinforcing that technical feel.] ...


5

I use a double-dash, and specifically a double-dash (not an em dash), on both sides of the interruption. The demon -- he? she? -- gestured toward the supply wagons. Although in your example, the interruption doesn't make sense; it would not make sense to say "The demon she gestured toward the supply wagons."


5

Asking for a certain number of pages, along with particular formatting, can seem like a holdover from a pre-computer age. They forgot to update their requirements! And sometimes it is. But another way to look at it is to imagine that the publisher will be printing it out. Many probably do. Others may only print out ones that make a final cut. And some ...


5

It's fine to use action to insert a beat in the dialogue, or just as a change of pace from tags. But you must separate out each person's actions (whether it's speech, thought, or something else) in to a new paragraph. What you wrote isn't clear. Amadeus' version is perfectly good. How you format it is up to you and it will depend on the sentence or two ...


5

The general rule is to start a new paragraph for dialogue or action by a new character. Everything you wrote here is Lisa describing and thinking about what Jack has said or done. So, yes, it can go into one paragraph. But it doesn't have to. If you feel more comfortable breaking up, then break it up. The new paragraph will allow the scene to breathe a ...


5

I think you will find this a matter of formatting style that is unusual enough not to have a convention. Certain publishers of music might have guidelines for it (can't help you there), but in a book you can probably present it as you wish. A publisher may choose to format it differently, as with most formatting details, but if you start with something you ...


5

Many editions of the Bible print Jesus’ words in red ink (although generally not God’s). This is what people who call themselves “red-letter Christians” are referring to. Even those that don’t customarily translate the ineffable name of God as “LORD” in small-caps, and in a few cases, GOD in small caps (generally in phrases such as “the lord GOD”). Those ...


4

Can you do it? Sure. Should you do it? Most likely, no. It's not that you can't use footnotes as an explanatory aide. Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time does so. It's just a matter of making use of the disruption in a constructive manner beneficial to the experience you are attempting to invoke. There is no such thing as a bad ...


4

There are two parts that impact issues like this. The style guides you link are in use for documents that are frequently displayed and transferred between highly variable devices and services - The presence of characters such as the Degree Symbol are still not completely reliable, and using them may result in unexpected values being displayed. As robust as ...


4

I would be careful about saying most style guides. For instance, here's what The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), 10.58, says, referring to its own guidance as well the International Symbol of Units (SI) format: In SI usage as in general usage, a space usually appears between the numeral and any abbreviation or symbol. Contrary to general usage, ...


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