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Visually distinguishing a character's dialogue is not a bad idea. Sir Terry Pratchett used this tool quite a lot. Most notably, his Death spoke in ALL CAPS, including small caps when needed. (Small caps make reading significantly easier than just all caps.) There was also a special font used for the Golems' speech in Feet of Clay, a character in The Amazing ...


13

Besides Death in the books of Sir Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (10 Doctors and a Professor omitted), there are lots of precedents for special font or alignment for various usages. The Bible In contrast to some modern prints (see below), the 42-line Gutenberg Bible in Latin of 1454 (part 1) (part 2) uses the same font for everything and no special ...


5

Many editions of the Bible print Jesus’ words in red ink (although generally not God’s). This is what people who call themselves “red-letter Christians” are referring to. Even those that don’t customarily translate the ineffable name of God as “LORD” in small-caps, and in a few cases, GOD in small caps (generally in phrases such as “the lord GOD”). Those ...


4

Put question marks when you have rising intonation. I suggest you read your poem out loud. Do this multiple times and really do it out loud, not just in your head. Try it with and without the question marks. Or try them in different places. Punctuation is a guide for how to speak writing out loud (of course it also serves other purposes, including for ...


4

For formatting S.I. units the standards are posted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology link. To conform to the standard there should be a space between the numerical value of the quantity and the unit: "9 mm". The usual "9mm" is a non-standard format that has become accepted in common usage (for better or worse). If you are doing ...


4

Screenplays are production documents. Screenplays communicate things that are intended for production like who says what line, so casting agents, directors, and actors know who is present in the scene without second-guessing the author or discovering it episodes later. The producer/director/casting agent of the first episode may never read any of the later ...


3

This is fundamentally a matter of creative preference and desired effect. There is not a right answer for every book, although there might be a right answer for your book: The purpose of the list, the nature of the overall text, and the length of the list are considerations that you can use to decide where to put a list of media titles. If this is a non-...


3

Just write what you mean clearly and expect intelligent people to understand it. In a recent script I indicated I wanted various lines spoken while they appeared as text on the screen. I wrote that. It was clearly signposted. People understand it. Don't use abbreviations before you explain them. For example, above you say 'multiple supers' and I didn't know ...


3

I would strongly urge you to AVOID FORMATTING to convey meaning around the text or dialog in a novel. I would encourage using words to describe the text or dialog, and to convey your intended meaning or emphasis. Special formatting may be difficult for persons with disabilities, or people using text-to-speech tools, or automated voice synthesis. The ...


3

I think that, when formatted differently, a god's speech tends to be formatted with a font more convoluted than normal text. Perhaps to reflect that such a god is something on a higher level of complexity, is beyond normal. Also refinement and beauty. Fonts such as flourished script, or perhaps gothic. Depending on your online publishing tool(s), you ...


3

Keep it consistent. If you are using indented paragraphs with the first paragraph of a chapter not indented, maintain this regardless of the content. Starting with quoted speech isn’t a reason to break consistency. This formatting style is very common, and chapters that start with quoted text are always formatted the same as regular text: with no indent.


3

It honestly doesn't matter, as long as you keep all the "multiple-choice"/"multiple choice" and "multiple-response"/"multiple response" consitistant. I have seen both being used with or without hyphens on tests and these really no difference. As long as each one is consistant with itself, there is no issue. That being said, I would probably use "multiple ...


3

For a scientific work, I would go with something more like scientific notation: 4.54 * 10^7 (four point five four times ten to the seven) Many engineers prefer to use only power of three exponents (3, 6, 12, 21, etc...), so then it would become: 45.4 * 10^6 (forty five point four times ten to the six) For something less formal (where it should be okay to ...


2

I haven't been able to find a book, per se, but I have found a couple of resources that might work for your other request be being able to adopt someone else's writing style. I did a Google search on: "history of" "writing styles"; "history of" "writing styles" book. Here are some of the results that seem to fit your ...


2

I looked for an App that would provide the nikud (vowels) to words I was using to create a glossary. However, once I had the words in that form, I could no longer sort them (as we can tell from these questions). However, the same App, https://nakdan.dicta.org.il/ also allows the user to select the "modern Hebrew" version, and if you click on לחץ כאן (...


2

The semicolon properly separates items in a list that themselves contain commas: "Please send the memo to Jason, Chief Information Officer; Sarah, President; and Courtney, an investor." [1, 2] [1] https://style.mla.org/serial-commas-and-semicolons/ [2] https://www.grammar-monster.com/lessons/semicolons_in_lists.htm


2

I'm quite late to this question, but was searching for exactly the same thing. I discovered PML. Unfortunately it's still under development and only have a windows client. But the syntax and structure is exactly what I was looking for in a markup language. I'm tempted to write my own parser/renderer for linux/macos, since the language looks promising to me....


2

I have seen capitalised or text used for this purpose, but again, almost exclusively in light-hearted works. It comes across as fourth wall breaking, saying "Even the font thinks this character is powerful". If that's your purpose, then bold text is probably fine. On the other hand, you certainly shouldn't feel like you have to do it. I've seen lots of ...


2

This reminds me of Life of Pi. The protagonist is a young man from India named Piscine (French for "swimming pool". I forget why he's called this, but I'm sure he does explain it). As a kid, he was bullied at school because his name sounds like "pissing", so he shortened his name to "Pi" and made it stick by reciting hundreds of digits of pi on a blackboard....


2

I personally wouldn't find it unrealistic that people in any country today mocked somebody for the way their name sounds in English. I'd say keep it. I'm aware that not all countries have a capacity of speaking English as if it were their second official language, but in Denmark, it's pretty much the case. I'd believe something like this to happen in ...


2

It's not clear from the question if you've literally used quotation marks and a hyphen or not. You should not use both. Stylistically, it's more common than not to use a hyphen. But some people choose to use quotation marks instead, especially if there are many words being used adjectivally: It was a once-in-a-lifetime moment. It was a "once in a ...


2

Let us first of all note that this scenario assumes a writer who has a contract for the book. For that, the answer is, yes, the publisher can edit to the book to its standards, and generally does. This is not only formatting, from the font onwards, but can be other alterations to the book. (And nowadays, the publisher expects it in electronic format.) ...


2

The author's rights and responsibilities are spelled out in the contract they sign with the publisher, whether standard, vanity, or otherwise. These contracts also spell out who owns the rights to publication as well as copyright protection. For example, a publisher contracts with an author for a book that the publisher wants to distribute nationally as well ...


2

I have written somewhere between a dozen and a score non-fiction books, going back to the 90s, for several different publishers and imprints. All of these involved a contract before writing started. The process was: write the text, in Word with particular styles applied that the publisher uses. Eg for a chapter title, or a picture caption. prepare the ...


1

There are many examples of formatting where a select few words are emphasized, but to do that for the entire first sentence is not a popular option. Why? Its position at the top of a paragraph already denotes it as the sentence to skim in a cursory reading. There would simply be too much special formatting. You know how in the comments section on many ...


1

Poems are handled the same way as books. There are quite a few online citation generators that may be of help. owl.purdue.edu has good alternatives for whether you'd like to emphasize the original author or the translator. Usually, you cite the original author: Foucault, Michel. Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. ...


1

There are myriad of publishers out there, and each of them has their own rules. Some require a Word document with your name and contact information in the header of every page, page numbers in the footer, and section titles formatted. Others want none of that and only that the document is in Times New Roman, double-spaced, and left-justified. Then there are ...


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