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I have written somewhere between a dozen and a score non-fiction books, going back to the 90s, for several different publishers and imprints. All of these involved a contract before writing started. The process was: write the text, in Word with particular styles applied that the publisher uses. Eg for a chapter title, or a picture caption. prepare the ...


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The author's rights and responsibilities are spelled out in the contract they sign with the publisher, whether standard, vanity, or otherwise. These contracts also spell out who owns the rights to publication as well as copyright protection. For example, a publisher contracts with an author for a book that the publisher wants to distribute nationally as well ...


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Let us first of all note that this scenario assumes a writer who has a contract for the book. For that, the answer is, yes, the publisher can edit to the book to its standards, and generally does. This is not only formatting, from the font onwards, but can be other alterations to the book. (And nowadays, the publisher expects it in electronic format.) ...


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As a reader I'd buy a collection of short stories rather than a single story in this case. When buying a single short story the organizational overhead and cover work will have a relative larger impact on the price. With a collection I expect to get a better deal. I wouldn't worry about the cover design. The challenge is finding your publisher. Search for ...


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Sorry, Amori L; 1970s or 1950s or 1920s or longer ago perspectives are in no useful way different, for the simple reason that the technology is relevant to printing, not to publishing. It simply doesn't work the way you suggest (and crucially, where did you get those ideas?) There are three roles involved: author, publisher and printer… they could be only ...


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