24

When in doubt, do what the masters did. Some examples: Raoden breathed a sigh of relief. "Whoever you are, I'm glad to see you. I was beginning to think everyone in here was either dying or insane." "We can't be dying," the an responded with a snort. "We're already dead. Kolo?" "Kolo." The foreign word was vaguely familiar, as was the man's strong ...


19

I don't think this is the right way to go about it. I have to say I'm not a fan of explanatory footnotes in fiction, it's far too much of an immersion breaker. In fact I'd go so far as to say they are flat-out awful and should be avoided wherever possible. It's a mental load having to go down to the foot of the page, read something that necessarily breaks ...


11

Footnotes are sometimes a good solution and sometimes a bad one; it depends greatly on the tone you want to set. In fact, I'd say the question you want to answer is why your characters should speak another language at all. (The solution with italics would be very confusing—I don't think I've ever seen it done.) Footnotes will be a momentary distraction to ...


11

You don’t say what age of children you want to address and I’m not sure whether your use of the young-adult tag indicates older children or if that is intended to cover your ’adult’ audience. If you are talking about children who have a minimum 4-5 years of schooling, I’d suggest considering a glossary as a section either at the front of the back of the ...


9

It All Depends on the POV. I would use ZERO footnotes in a fictional novel. I think it may have been done, but I think it breaks the reader's reverie and immersion in the story. It is bad form. The same goes for translating in italics, it isn't clear that is a translation, especially if it doesn't happen often. It all depends on the POV. If this is the ...


7

Welcome. You do not need to use footnotes in a novel. In fact, they're usually distracting. Sometimes you can do it, but it's pretty unusual. An example of one that worked was really a chapter endnote and it is for a book in the Little House series. It let the reader know that “fever 'n' ague” (which was the topic of the chapter) is now known as malaria....


7

If I understand correctly, the comments are in the original text. That's what the translator's note says: the interlinear comments (IC) and marginal comments (MC) in the original text If something is in the original text, the translator has to translate it. What the translator did is adapt the format to what we're better used to nowadays, and what is ...


6

The acceptability of the use of footnotes varies a lot. 6-7 lines would be huge in many works but is nothing when compared to others. If it doesn't belong inside the text, and endnotes aren't a possibility, then a long footnote seems appropriate. I would cut it down as much as you can. Footnotes should be more informational than storytelling. While ...


5

I would recommend just leaving it completely untranslated and let the reader pick up the basic meaning from context. In this case, we only really need to know SAHU is an insult and the direct translation is unimportant. If it is important for the reader to know what a single specific word means, just have another character ask, what you mean by SAHU? Or ...


5

First off, I basically agree with Cyn's statement that lots of footnotes can make a text feel more like an academic work than a novel. That said, you say that the purpose of these footnotes is to help a translator. Ask yourself: Why would such notes, in whichever form, intended for an extremely narrow audience, need to go into the text the reader sees? ...


5

Provided you mean that footnotes are only for translations (that is, you're not using footnotes for additional information or for source citations), I'd put the glossary of translations at the beginning, and skip the footnotes. The glossary up front will alert the readers that foreign words are coming up in the text, and putting everything in one spot makes ...


5

There are a few points to balance with an issue like this. What is the tone and style of the work? Does the use of footnotes aid in reinforcing the tone and style. [If the main character is technical, and the whole piece has a fairly technical tone and air to it, then the use of footnotes might actually serve as a means of reinforcing that technical feel.] ...


4

Choice 1: Move the last line and the footnote to the next page. This will leave a little blank space on the original page. If you want an even bottom margin, increase the line spacing, or move some text from the previous page to the current page, which means moving text from the page before that, etc, and reformatting the entire chapter. Choice 2: Put the ...


4

The answer is: It's up to you, and it depends on the context. I normally wouldn't chime in on academic writing, since we have experts here in APA and MLA, but this question seems to involve none of the usual academic style guides. To back up a little: What are often called "footnotes" are, in academic writing, meant to do one of a couple of things: (1) ...


4

Can you do it? Sure. Should you do it? Most likely, no. It's not that you can't use footnotes as an explanatory aide. Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time does so. It's just a matter of making use of the disruption in a constructive manner beneficial to the experience you are attempting to invoke. There is no such thing as a bad ...


3

Your example confuses the issue just a bit. There is a difference between print documents that are available online, and online articles. In the former case you don't need to give a link at all, and when you do, you are doing it simply to make the document more accessible. In this case you can use any link shortener that you like. The url is irrelevant to ...


3

I took riding lessons from a Polish gentleman - former lieutenant in the Polish Cavalry, spent time as a Vaccaro so his credentials were impeccable. Occasionally, when we were not picking up what he was putting down, he would start to speak Polish. It was our assumption that he was swearing or at the very least, extremely frustrated with us. We would try ...


3

For Turabian (Probably Chicago as well, though I am particularly familiar with the Turabian guide, not Chicago directly.) When doing a long summary/paraphrase (i.e. a whole paragraph), it is best to include the name and the article/website/book title up front (this alerts the reader in general where your information is coming from). Then only put a ...


3

Cheat and edit your text. Or keep combing backwards through your layout, either pushing a few lines forward or bringing a few lines back, until your footnote and the referent are on the same page.


3

Personally, I would reconsider marking it with the same footnote marker, and rather mark them as 1 and 2, with the 2nd one consisting of the word "Ibid." Ibid means "the same place", and is "used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the preceding endnote or footnote". If you reference the same source more ...


3

1) This kind of formatting may be something which would have to be done manually by the end typesetter/layout person before publication. You would run everything in numerical sequence regardless of the kind of note. Indicate in the body of the footnote which was which (for example, every footnote would be preceded with [TN] or [FN] for translator's note/...


3

When I was a kid, I had the Walking With Dinosaurs and Walking With Beasts companion books, and I read them over and over. I didn't know a lot of the more technical terms, but I could either look them up in the dictionary, or just guess what they meant based on context. It didn't affect my enjoyment of, or engrossment in, the stories in the slightest. I ...


2

As Oxinabox says, if you are writing for a journal, they will almost always, if not literally always, have standards for footnotes and endnotes. Usually they'll say to follow MLA or APA or whatever style guide. Some may have their own rules. If you are writing a scholarly book, the publisher may have a specific style guide. If not, or if you are self-...


2

I'm wrestling with this issue right now. It is annoying to see a long, long URL, but equally annoying to see meaningless short URLs (beginning 'bit.ly,' which I mistakenly took to be malware sites at first). Since Bitly now allows customized short URLs, how about this as a citation: "Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 41, Part 3, 423. Google eBooks [shortened ...


2

A citation is a pointer to a source. While a URL is technically that, when universities say "citation" they mean something following a formal citation format. A citation typically includes an author, the title of the work, a publisher, and the date of publication. A URL, on the other hand, contains none of that, and if it turns into a dead link later, the ...


2

The SUBJECT of this question focuses on proper hyperlink citation. However, the narrative focuses on the correct usage of footnote/endnote. So, my answer will focus on the footnote/endnote usage. The answer you seek might depend on your preference of style guide unless the document's publisher requires otherwise. For instance, according to MLA Style, ...


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