4

Kind of, but don't go overboard. In theory, yes, you could combine as many literary techniques and figures of speech together as you want and it would make for a semi-coherent piece of writing. However, it wouldn't necessarily be very good writing, and a lot of the deliberate meaning of literary techniques is lost when they are smashed together like Play-Doh....


3

Your examples don’t seem like examples of using metonmy Changing “She flirted with the raunchy snarls of men.” to read “she flirted with the catcalls and wolf whistles” uses metonymy to imply the snarling raunchy men are represented by catcalls or wolf whistles. Your second example “She flirted with degenerate men” might be a metonym if you drop the word men ...


3

If you write with a POV character (e.g. first or third person POV) your descriptions should always be colored by what that character is thinking and feeling. For example, if the character is driving her car through a neighborhood and this is where she grew up and she knows everyone and has memories from many parts of the place, the description will be of one ...


2

I think in your example you are personifying the 'Forest' because The forest thought that these branches could be good for hanging myself (suicide). the forest is thinking. And, the thoughts the forest is thinking The forest thought that these branches could be good for hanging myself (suicide). are clumsily expressing the forest's idea. You can ...


2

The specific use of "fall to" is not at all the same as "fall on". In fact I would read it to mean that Avalon lost (fell) to whoever "these lands" is. Try Avalon rained down on X. Death and blood poured from the sky. "Rained down on" is a clearer metaphor for suddenly and overwhelmingly entering a place and having a ...


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