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7

Don't get Bogged Down in the Technical Stuff: It is outstanding to have this level of detail in mind when creating a fictional city. Kudos. But these things are best for you to have in the background, so if they become relevant, you can pull on them. But guess what? 90% of the time, these factors won't matter to your readers. The less technical and more ...


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The general advice for writing a culture or a viewpoint that isn't your own is to do plenty of research. Ideally, you want to visit or live there. Second choice is to interview people from that place. Third choice is books and other media from there --which you already seem immersed in. Definitely find someone from that culture to read your manuscript and ...


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Writers have responded to this challenge in many different ways over the years. The current common practice is to provide enough of the language pattern for flavor, and then render largely in standard English, trusting the reader to infer the distinct language pattern themselves. However, this doesn't work as well if the language is a barrier to the other ...


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Let me throw this at you, not as a suggestion for what to write, but as a writing prompt regarding this or a similar character: He was a typical martinet--such a stickler for everything being just right that he would rather eat a cold meal than have one pea out of place on his plate.


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All those things would fit well into a gazetteer of your fictional world, and may be important to know when constructing your story, but they don't sound all that interesting to readers. If you want them to experience your city through the pages of your story, you're going to need more than statistics. Imagine you've spent a day in an unfamiliar city (or ...


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When writing about a city, writing should connect your audience with your world. Technical details do not help much in this respect. Cities were like women, he insisted; each one had its own unique scent. Oldtown was as flowery as a perfumed dowager. Lannisport was a milkmaid, fresh and earthy, with woodsmoke in her hair. King's Landing reeked like some ...


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Use Wikipedia articles I had the same questions you have. I used the Wikipedia articles on London, Paris, New York City, and Stockholm combined to create a kind of questionnaire for cities. Looking at the headlines alone will give you an idea of how they're structured. I suggest picking the capital in your country as well to get a "home feeling" or ...


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I asked this very question recently to a group of book editors. They disagreed with what was written here. For context, here was my original post: So, I have a question and it’s a situation I use a lot, but find contradictory information about. “I hate this refrain,” John said, as he went and sat in the corner of the room by himself. The question is the rule ...


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Straight up man, learn this difference: A journalist reports on events, an artist invents. There is a difference, then, between a writer and a journalist. A journalist sticks to the facts to his or her best ability; a writer, an artist, uses facts but also twists them to forge truth from both fact and lies. Do what you want, but don’t feel stupid for wanting ...


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The good news is that from a legal standpoint, Pakistan and America aren't too far separate and both use Common Law for their court systems (The big difference is the ~250 year divide when the U.S. broke with British and added a codified constitution to further govern it's laws (the UK is today one of the few countries with out a codified constitution in the ...


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Rethinking Genre: Although you want to write in a contemporary setting, I'd suggest that to overcome your concerns about realism and getting details right, write in a slightly different genre. There are a wide variety of fantasy, science fiction, and alternative reality stories that would allow you to take all the unique and special elements of your culture, ...


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