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1

Read a writing guide. If you were trying to better your own writing, I'd suggest reading several of them, but that's probably overkill here. The aim isn't for you to accept every "do this instead of that because this example shows why the former's preferable" rule as correct; it's just for you to get into the headspace of people who are used to saying things ...


2

What works for me is I have a list of questions that I work to. At the very least, I reword the question as a statement, like "was the opening clear?" becomes "The opening was clear and I could understand what was going on." and "Did you want to keep reading?" becomes "I wanted to keep reading to find out what happened next." (Or sometimes, "I was glad that ...


2

Ask them what kind of feedback they are looking for. Do they want your opinion on the characters, a specific chapter, the plot line, the details and grammar or only the general conflict? Is it fiction or non-fiction your giving feedback on? When I proofread pieces (non-fiction), I make sure I know the goal of my reading and I communicate with the writer ...


8

Give specific feedback, not general feedback, make sure you mention anything that you do find especially good, and focus on constructive/productive criticism. For example: I thought the section with the dog was strong. The imagery really came alive there and drew me in. The next section didn't grab me in the same way, you might want to think about ...


0

@wetcircuit has some really good points that you should consider. I'm going to attempt to answer your question more directly, however. I'm going to use Scribophile as my example but I believe other sites work similarly. Scribophile has forums, where you can ask question but, in some ways more importantly, you can just read other people's questions and ...


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