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2

I agree with the other answer, that asking for a single area of improvement is a great idea, as it takes the pressure off and focuses on your hunger to improve. In addition, I would suggest that you really need to get feedback from more than one person, as writing and reading is so subjective you need a range of opinions to get a sense of where there are ...


5

"I really want to make this better; please could you tell me just one thing I could improve?" This helps take the pressure off: you're not looking for a thorough dissection, but something that will take much less of the reader's time. Like you, I find that a simple, "What do you think?" always gets back a polite, "Very nice, thanks." I do have a few ...


2

My answer may seem to contradict some of the statements given. So let me point out that feedback is invaluable. But only as such that it doesn't inhibit you creatively. I've worked for tv stations and book publishers and I know how some ideas have changed dramatically from the first idea to the final product. Sometimes so drastically that the writers ...


0

I have a series of novels I am trying to get published. If a traditional publisher won't take them, I will put them out there myself (for free because if someone else isn't prepared to pay, I shouldn't either. They might not be good enough.) I would never get a friend to pay for my work to be printed, even if they offered to. You have to consider what you ...


8

You should seek feedback at whatever point that feedback is not going to interfere with your writing process. It's quite possible to get feedback too early, and have it choke off your creativity. It's also possible to seek feedback too frequently, and to burn out your beta readers. But if your first experience of feedback is when you submit to a publisher, ...


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