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Contrary to the answers claiming the contrary, this is in fact a well-recognized subgenre of fantasy, known as posthumous fantasy, a narrative whose most prominent fantastic element is that it takes place in an imagined afterlife. Although you might quibble with the categorization as fantasy, the fact remains, in the absence of any confirmed reportage from ...


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The whole idea idea of genre is to help reader have a quick idea of the book before reading/buying. It's generally decided by publisher rather than writer. I've seen books with multiple disconnected or sometimes even conflicting genres printed on their front page. So, the real question is who are your target audience? Will a fantasy reader be disappointed ...


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For the lack of separate "afterlife" genre, I would say the following: If your plot takes place in fictional afterlife world, then it's likely a Fantasy. If it happens in the real world, while the protagonist becomes incorporeal, then it's Paranormal. If you put real effort into scientific explanation of all of this, the genre becomes Sci-Fi.


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It's not fantasy, it is a different genre. In fantasy, the world and things in it are real, for the story, but not the same as actual Earth. So there doesn't have to be magic (that is called Science Fantasy), but the world and its contents (creatures, magical or not) has to be the real thing. Your magical creature is not real. We might say the "afterlife" ...


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I've also had this problem. I think it stems from putting the cart before the horse --you're trying to start with the journey, and shoehorning in the character development. Instead, decide what situations you need for character development, and build the journey around that. For instance, let's say you need your characters to develop a physical attraction ...


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While there is something to be said for cutting the travel if it doesn't add to the plot, instant travel makes the world feel small. If you want to paint a large world, you need to pay the price for getting from A to B. As an alternative, you can take inspiration from stories that are entirely contained within a journey. Stories like Murder on the Orient ...


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My process for writing the villain is to actually 'flip' the story in my head, and work on the villain as if they are the protagonist. Look at the evil plan as if it is the righteous plan is actually a very interesting process because you can start to develop a lot of nuance for it. It can help create moments of doubt with the protagonist because by ...


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One approach is to build the plan from the character. An interesting character has interesting desires, which lead to interesting plans. Some examples. Lucifer (Paradise Lost) Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven. Jealous and self-obsessed. When God doesn't love him as much as he feels he should be loved, he rejects God, but is never capable of ...


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You are writing science fiction, right? You could make a point of not mentioning human racism in any way, shape, or form, and thereby highlight how your fictional society differs from the real world. This is a very good option if you are far in the future, or if mankind has contacted other sentient species. Of course a couple of centuries without racism ...


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Everything that contributes to the story you want to tell needs to be included, and everything that detracts from your story needs to be excluded. So if your story is about society or the personal experience of the hero, then racism is probably one of the things that are a part and belong there. But if your story is about superpowers and science, then you ...


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It's Science Fiction, so depending on how far in the future this is set, we may assume that today's problems are totally irrelevant - but that in the future, there might be totally different problems. And that there will be people that are victims of systematic discrimination. But not because they are black, but for example because they are part of the ...


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It's clearly seen that you are defining and introducing the characters you had created and included in your book by using their "races". Then it's out of your control to either include the issue of "racism" or not, of course on the side of the readers. As the author, you don't have to discuss, bring attention or express your thoughts on racism and the ...


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A novel doesn't have to address every problem with society. A good novel has something it is trying to say (besides being entertaining) but you shouldn't try to shoehorn a treatment of every social injustice into your novel. You'll have some theme you are trying to express, and if you try to squeeze in everything else you'll end up with the point of your ...


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It's not necessary at all. A little over 50 years ago, Gene Roddenberry produced Star Trek. Of the main cast members, two were very much White Americans, one was black, one was Scottish, one was Russian (in the middle of the Cold War!), one was Japanese, and one was non-human, and this was all treated as perfectly normal and never remarked upon in-universe....


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Why do people seem to think that if a character isn't a straight white male, then the story must address homophobia, racism, and sexism? When was the last time you saw a movie with a black actor that didn't "talk funny", and without jokes or antagonism related to race? One of the things that made the original Night of the Living Dead movie memorable was ...


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If racism is a component of your storyline, then mention it to whatever degree it's a component of your storyline. Otherwise, never feel compelled to bring something in "just to bring it in". You are never burdened with addressing any societal issue you don't want to address, and if you do want to address it, then it by definition is part of the story. ...


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I don't think you do need to address it, you can just ignore it. One example I can think of is the superhero-comedy movie Hancock, with Will Smith. He's black, and plays John Hancock, a black superhero (with amnesia). He lives like a bum, dressed in rags, filthy, drunk, sleeping on public benches. He does fight crime, sometimes with a bottle of whiskey in ...


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It's not enough to consider your character's present - you must also consider their past People (and characters) are shaped by their experiences in life. Even if your characters are not dealing with racism during the course of your story, if they have experienced it in the past (and I dare say that any modern American of mixed heritage has experienced ...


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Assuming your main characters haven't been in a regular society for a long time, I doubt it is necessary, however since your characters will occasionally interact with the rest of society, maybe you can have them be criticized for their unnatural and "Freakish" powers? Just a suggestion, but other than that I don't think it'll be necessary. Then again it's ...


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