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5

Plot is the dramatization of the lessons the character learns. So, if you have to pause the plot for the character to learn a lesson, something has gotten out of sync. "Show, don't tell" may be overused, not-always-applicable advice for novels, but when it comes to life lessons, it's non-negotiable. The problem is that you want your character to ...


3

Message via story Your intuition is probably right. The best way to convey a message is via Story. The choices of people, plot and setting should/will/may tie into a message. I would continue working with scenes and action, and stay clear of the magic potions for a little longer. The best way to convey a message is by not giving the reader anything that even ...


2

There's no one right answer to this question --many authors have encountered this challenge and come up with many different solutions. Here are a few: Start in the middle of the story (in media res) and then jump back to the beginning. Drop the first few chapters, and start closer to the real action. Add a mini-conflict to the opening scenes to make them ...


1

It's hard to say actually. If we go by your plan A So, in the first four chapters or so, we get to know his current situation and the world in which the story takes place through his interactions with the people around him. You can still make it interesting; I am sure you must have read at least the first chapter of famous fantasy books like Harry Potter ...


0

Dude, I think you could keep this beginning linear, so you can have an introduction where people can understand the context of the story before the action starts. Make the person understand the character so that they can feel something for him, and then like the story. If you still opt for flashback, then create a scheme for your story where those memories ...


1

You could simply look at Deadpool: nearly invulnerable, ugly, entertaining. A little bit foul-mouthed, maybe, but in a charming way. ;)


3

The challenge a character is seeking to overcome should not be the thing that is easy for them to achieve. If a protagonist is bulletproof, and has no problems beyond people shooting at him, then there is very little challenge or struggle involved. Overpowered characters are interesting either because they have an even more overpowered opponent, or because ...


5

An invulnerable character who can't be killed is not necessarily an invincible character who always wins. Suppose there was a character with the invulnerability of Superman but no other powers, no super strength, no X-ray vision, no flight, no superbreath, nothing except they couldn't be killed. Suppose the villain call be killed but has a superpower like ...


5

There are plenty of good alternatives out for the life of death theme. Here are a few of those alternatives: Use the weaker characters The main character will not be the only character in the book. You could have the villains capture the unkillable character's family and hold them hostage and under the threat of death. Now, your character has a goal and ...


1

When it comes to "entertaining" and also "nigh invulnerable", I can do no better than refer you to that paragon of paragons; that manliest of arachnids; that superest of superheroes, the mysterious blue crimefighter known only as .. The Tick! If you do a simple internet search on "The Tick" and/or "Ben Edlund", you ...


21

Unable to be killed is not the same thing as unable to be defeated. Being captured, wrapped in chains, sealed in a box filled with concrete and dropped in the ocean may not kill the protagonist, but it should "defeat" him for at least some period of time. Also threats to others may also defeat him. A missile strike may not hurt the protagonist at ...


2

How does what you want to say relate to the invulnerability of the MC? Are you writing an adventure story (invulnerability would reduce the stakes, but raise some possibilities)? A story about depression or alienation (all of the MC's friends die and MC becomes lonely)? Mystery (you mentioned the MC isn't sure about their own vulnerability)? Not every story ...


42

When the main character is physically invulnerable, then that gives you an opportunity to highlight their emotional vulnerability. Address how his newfound superpowers affect his relationships with other characters. Don't threaten the main character, threaten the characters who are dear to him. Don't threaten the main character with physical injuries, ...


10

Over the years I've noticed that, in media with nigh-invulnerable protagonists, battles tend to follow a basic formula: A villain shows up somewhere and starts causing mayhem A weaker (but still powerful) character tries to stop them and gets their ass kicked The protagonist shows up, rescues the weaker character, and defeats the villain The initial ...


1

That character must have a moment of weakness/vulnerability. For instance, Superman is unkillable (almost). One of the greatest story of his was the one where he uses his SUPER EYE LASER. This helped him defeat this powerful foe, but at what cost? He was literally nerfed down to human level for several of hours. This allows thrilling moments to enter the ...


1

Ahhh...the good ole flashback dilemma! I'd say the usage just depends on how you write your story. There is no real right way to do it. But if placed properly, flashbacks can intensify the mood of a scene, or add insight into a character's decision. Example: When she saw the smoke swirling from his nostrils, she felt immediate revulsion. Suddenly, she was ...


2

There's no real hard and fast rule for this and as such it'll vary from work to work. Put them in the place where it makes the most sense in the narrative. That said, make it clear so the reader will know they're reading a flashback and the context of it should make sense and be relevant to the scene the flashback is framed in.


0

Be Consistent: My novel has a series of dream sequences where the MC is essentially reliving segments of a dead (ghost) character's life. I always placed them at the very beginning of a chapter so that people are already expecting a transition. I also indented them, and used a scene break and extra space to set them apart from the main text. Most of them ...


2

Generally, you can place flashbacks in the beginning, middle, or end of a chapter. Or dedicate a full chapter to them. The only general rule I've seen is to try to keep them away from the beginning of the novel. Most definitely not start the novel with lots of flashbacks. Keep them in act II where we know the people of the novel and care about them enough to ...


-2

Edit: Since my own reply to myself is the only answer that isn't "It is inevitable. Just accept it", I'm going to mark this as a solution of how to handle it until someone else comes along with a better one. Thanks for your responses. The gist I got out of it is: "It is inevitable, there is nothing I can do about it, and I should simply ...


11

You've just encountered one of the oldest and most famous rules of the Internet: Rule 34: If it exists, there is porn of it. No exceptions. The first thing to point out is that Rule 34 is not a "current trend". Porn parodies have been around in some form or another for decades. The advent of the Internet has merely made them easier to create, ...


8

In a way this is an irrational fear, not because it will never happen, but because of the reverse - short of never sharing your work with the world at large there's essentially nothing you can do to prevent it. Rule 34 holds as significant amount of truth now as it did 18 years ago. And the more popular and widely known a property/character gets the more ...


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