New answers tagged

0

Find a credible developmental editor (or coach), preferably someone familiar with your genre, who can give you a professional opinion on your book. They should not only give you an idea of whether you are overly descriptive, but can suggest how to improve. It's entirely possible your descriptive style is appropriate, but not for your genre. I'm told there ...


4

Unfortunately, an objective answer is impossible without first reading your book. But if you suspect your novel might contain too many descriptive passages, it's a good idea to let someone else (preferably not a relative or friend) read your work and provide feedback before you publish it. As writers we often want to provide our readers with the exact image ...


2

At heart this is a worldbuilding question. What shape the conflict takes depends on a number of setting and motivation related factors. For instance, who are these foreigners? Are they explorers, looking for gold in a distant land, and are they the first people to make contact with this tribe? Exploration missions are expensive and dangerous. If a member of ...


1

There seem to be many different ways that the conflict could work. These are my examples: Methods War - all-out battle, think crusades and religious persecution - kill all the heretics and convert their children Missionary activity - think Christian missionaries or the Jewish Chabad movement. Force - pushing the elders and leaders into teaching the young/...


1

Frame Challenge: Sci-Fi and Fantasy (often) REQUIRE a new World Let's run with your example of the Na'vi. As you point out, they are stand-ins for various indigenous cultures that have been impacted by colonialism. That's the whole point. They are stand-ins. When you say "Native Americans" or "African Tribes" or any of a dozen other ...


4

Frame Shift Challenge: Logically, why wouldn't a culture from an alien world come off as "exotic" to the reader? People have noticed that other groups of sapient beings (including this as a qualifier since we are talking about aliens and non-human sophonts like centaurs) around the world have different cultures. It's an observation that goes back ...


0

Consider the pace of the fight, and compare with the pace of the reading. In a slow, lumbering slug-fest, you might have time to describe every blow. By contrast, I can punch you 3 times and kick you twice, all in less than 2 seconds. And, by the standards of international Martial Arts tournaments, that's slow (hence why I've never taken better than ...


2

Description is always a game of point of view. Even if you are doing 3rd person narration, you want to pick a point of view character for this action. Then, don't describe this like a sports announcer sitting on the sidelines. Instead, try to see it as your character would. They wouldn't take in everything, so give us what they would actually notice, and ...


4

The way I've heard it said is as follows... Only show blows that are important. Gloss over unimportant parts of the fight with generalized dialogue because it doesn't provide any useful information to the reader. Focus on events which show reversal of the situation. One party or another gets the upper hand, the fight escalates, there is a significant change ...


2

How important is the sentence is your narrative? If not very important, then "everyone poured into the streets." Bad on you if you haven't set up the reader to understand that "everyone" refers to those of all species. If it is important, and this is perhaps the first time you are showing eqivalence amongst the species, then maybe ...


2

how about "a horde of people of many different species", or "A dense crowd with members of all six species who lived in the city".


4

Here are three possible answers, from the biggest intervention to the smallest, depending on what the underlying issue is: Maybe you aren't interested in people. That isn't an accusation. But we all write best the things we love best. Sometimes, in order to address our weaknesses as writers, we first have to address our weaknesses as observers. I used to be ...


3

Use a general word that includes them all. "A wave of creatures", "a wave of beings", etc. If it's necessary to identify the creatures, be more specific. "A wave of creatures from almost every species of land animal on Earth ..." Or "A wave of beings from every planet in the Orion arm of the galaxy ..." or whatever.


1

You'll have to answer some questions. What species are there? How many? What do they look like? If the species look similar, you can use similar words. It also depends on the species' name. For example, "humanity" comes from "human." If you named a species "Roax" (I just made that up, it's not from a certain place), than you could call it "Roanity," or "...


2

You can take a philosopher you agree with, turn them into a character, and build them a thorough backstory. Such a character will be "fleshed out, deep thinking," and you'll "understand them well"— —none of which makes them interesting to read or write about. Kant was certainly deep-thinking, but given his clockwork nature, I would not love reading about ...


3

Sounds like you need a new character to me. What I would do would be revisit the worldbuilding and look for something that would cause a deep issue for some character, and reinvent a story about that character.


2

You and your readers will only care about your story if it contains a character who is instrumental in protecting or shaping this world: Bring a disruptive force to bear down upon on your planet or your character's personal life. (Conflict) Give your character the primary role in shaping the outcome of this disruption. (Protagonist) Give another character ...


1

Everyone who fights must have a reason to fight. For the bully, it is to maintain his/her dominance. Your character, on the other hand, would need a strong reason to fight when he believes he is too weak to do so. Strong reasons can include survival of self or loved one or tribe, extreme anger or betrayal, or a lack of other options--being cornered as @...


1

As @colmde has commented a character may be forced to do something. But what I feel you mean is that the character is strongest than he thinks. So It could be a great chance to prove him wrong. As many things in life you think you have some limitations that are not real. An accident or stressful situation could make you grow or erase this mental blocks. ...


3

A character may be forced to fight if he's cornered, i.e. he has nowhere to escape to. If he's in a position where he has no choice but to fight or be killed, he will find that despair gives him a new type of courage.


5

I think you might be focusing too much on a plot device and not enough on character development. As Artichoke mentioned, your character doesn't need to fight. If your character is so weak that he would never fight, there's no way to force him to do so. You could make him run and hide. Even though the enemy might pressure him to fight (such as endangeringl ...


Top 50 recent answers are included