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1

In writing you have fiction and non-fiction. Under fiction, you have fantasy and reality. Reality is a story that could conceivably happen in our world/reality. Fantasy is anything that couldn't or hasn't happened. Within fantasy, you have SciFi, Magical, Alternate reality, etc. Within reality, you have mysteries, westerns, romance, etc. To me, the ...


1

You could say that something is fantasy because laws of science are ignored, like the conservation of momentum, without being seemingly science based, like sci-fi. You could avoid explaining these aspects as magic.


1

One might characterize most fiction in which people find true love or amazing success and live happily ever after as fantasy without actual "magic."


2

Sorry, I don't have answers for you, only more questions and a few thoughts: I think it doesn't have to be a waste of time, it can still be a really cool story - Game of Thrones was a hit TV series and almost the complete first season works without any magic. Another question would be how big the audience for such a story would be. I think fantasy fans ...


3

Fantasy isn't defined only by magic. I was a fan of fantasy literature for many years before coming across anyone trying to define "fantasy" as "stuff involving magic", which I've never really understood. For me, being set in an alternate world (including a fictional world-within-a-world like Harry Potter or Artemis Fowl) was always a bigger fantasy ...


3

Perhaps if you need a term, try "magical realism"? 98% like our world, but that little difference is what makes it fantasy... whether it's if subways will sometimes take you sideways to a different realm or unexpected country, or the Byzantine Empire stayed pagan, or if whenever Bob reads a book, all other copies of it are forever deleted, but he ...


11

Low vs High Fantasy: A sliding definition Humans love to makeup labels and group things, but some [many? Most?] subjects don't actually play as nice as we might like the deeper we dive into them. When it comes to grouping and classifying in literature we have some rather awkward issues in drawing lines in the sand and settling on what goes where. If you ...


6

There is also a genre called "Science Fantasy", also "Hard Fantasy" (borrowing from "Hard Science Fiction", which doesn't break any laws of physics) and of course just plain "Science Fiction". The genres with "Fantasy" in the name, even without magic, may have for example Dragons, not as magical creatures but just creatures. They may have other species ...


22

Firstly, it's certainly not going to be a 'waste of time' to write the story you want to tell, regardless of which genre it might end up being described as. Fantasy is a very broad genre; any story recognizably set in a world other than our own can easily be described as fantasy if it doesn't focus strongly on themes that would suggest another (the effects ...


7

I believe low fantasy can encompass stories which have no magic. In some examples I've seen of low fantasy there is no magic but the setting in which it takes place is an entirely fictional world complete with fictional religious and belief systems. For example one of my favorite authors David Gemmell in his book Legend, the book takes place in an ...


1

Here is how I dealt with Lissien, the language in my dragon book. Pick a few root words and use them a lot. This gives readers an idea of what you mean, through repetition and similarity. Thus the dragons are Lissai, their language Lissien, an adolescent dragon is a glissond, an adult female an olissair, a clan leader is a hlissak, the king is hlissosak, ...


2

Yes, writing a new language for you story is quite challenging. In working on fictional languages in the past, I started by determining what sounds the nationality uses (there are hundreds of basics sounds used in English, but most people stick with the Phoenician alphabet for simplicity's sake), then deciding on a subject phrase syntax (subject-adjective-...


3

Whatever language your readers speak, they expect your book to be "translated" into that language. I write in English for English speakers, I have written stories set in the ancient past where the characters, at best, would be speaking in Old English, but that might as well be a different language. I was careful to not use "modern" words and stick with ...


2

So, there are several ways to do this: First, translate into English everything except proper nouns (specific names of people, places, or things) or culturally unique concepts, and insulting words or expressive comments (Mein Gott! for a German who is fluent in English) and anything with counting or math that does not need to be done in communications (even ...


0

If everyone had one of these powers, you would imagine human development to have taken a very different path. Example: The Air people would have mastered flight before written history began. The Fire people would definitely have been cooking from the beginning. They would have fire hardened spears right from the get go as well. The Water guys would ...


0

As others have noted, you have to avoid names. You can't use their world or some specific monsters (no illithids!). Other monsters, like gnolls and orcs, predate D&D and thus are fair game (so to speak). I think the rise of LitRPG shows that plenty of people want to read about game-like worlds, at least as long as you put an interesting twist on it. In ...


2

I would say there's a couple reasons to create a world. "Wonder" as a point of interest As you mentioned, the genre is one reason. Something that appeals to readers of Sci-fi and Fantasy is being introduced to something new that inspires awe. (Think space stations the size of the moon or secret societies of wizards) The writing podcast Writing Excuses ...


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