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At the present time there are thousands of professional Hollywood child actors and even more amateur child actors in school plays, and several times as many adults who have auditioned as children or adults. I think if you asked for stories about typical and/or unusual audition experiences at some sites for actors you might get a number of answers. For ...


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Your question is very broad, but I try to answer it depending on how I interpreted it. I too, sometimes struggle with writing cultures, characters, and countries. The best tool you have is Research. In order to write about foreign traditions and people, you need to understand them first. In these pandemic times - you most likely will not be able to find and ...


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Have you ever been completely exhausted? If so, you can draw on that experience to see what would be realistic. If not --or if it's not fresh in your memory --it's an easy enough experience to create. Just go online and find a difficult workout video. Once you get done working out for 30 minutes, you'll know what exhaustion feels like. Just be sure to take ...


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You seem to have it covered decently well already, so you should do fine. Although, I think you might be overdoing it just a tad. As she's just fainted, I think this is a bit too tired. Depending on how long she's been out, that's how long your character has been napping. Probably not much longer than a minute or two(I've fainted before from heat, it's not ...


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As the answer by @D. A. Hosek said, single words and short phrases are not protected by copyright. However, if a number of names were all duplicated, particularly if there were also other similarities, ther might be an argument that the newer work was a derivative work and thus an infringement of copyright. This is a fact-based determination, but a single ...


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Copyright does not apply to single words or even phrases (including titles). The only possible issue here is if the other author trademarked her country name which is unlikely. So don't worry about it.


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Several answers say or imply that the use of "they" to mean a single person of unspecified sex is a recent development in English. This is not true -- that usage dates to the 1300s.Some very well known and well thought of writers used it, including Shakespeare. However it was not in fashion during the 19th C nor most of the 20th, so it will seem &...


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Can I use they/them pronouns in a medieval style fantasy novel? A simple answer is that you can but your characters can't. Thus, when you describe the character's actions, you use gender-neutral pronouns but when the characters speak, they use "he" or "she" according to how they perceive the person. Part of your plot could refer to them ...


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Realism is just a style, and accuracy is just a technique --meaning, you should do what best serves your story. There are historical pieces --the current Hulu series The Great is a prime example, and the classic fantasy novel The Once and Future King is another --that are presented in a contemporary style, and where the illusion of historical accuracy is not ...


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Sure you can. But, you have to make it fit into your world. You have two basic options here: Make your society tolerant of your character's gender. Quasi-medieval doesn't have to mean precisely medieval, most fantasy worlds have some fairly drastic differences from medieval times (among others, most of them don't have the Catholic Church around - that's ...


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How fantastic is this world? Is it basically historical fantasy (i.e. it's earth unless otherwise noted differently) OR is it another earth like planet in a medievel plot? I will say that the use of modern tolerance standards centuries ahead of modern standards pulls me out of the story a bit. I can accept dragons flying around England, but not a ...


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Journeying is a central part of my novel. A good, traditional theme from the Odyssey to Tolkein. However, it gets really boring really quickly to describe them walking through the same landscape for a few weeks. Well, then your job is to make it interesting. There's an entire genre devoted to making travel interesting: nonfiction travel writing. Travel is ...


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In addition to summarising the entire journey (examples provided in @Ceramicmrno0b's answer), you could also include several smaller time skips connected by significant events described in more detail. You'd summarise the first leg of the journey, then, for example, describe the scene of how they almost got spotted by scouts and little Timmy, previously seen ...


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Just say that they walked for two weeks, but throw in a few interesting tidbits about the journey. The longer the journey, the more details you add. Don't just write; "Alright, to mount death we go!" I said. We walked for two weeks, arriving breathless from the travel, blahblahblah... Write something along the lines of; "Alright, to mount ...


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