48

That's a substantial bit of revision. It can definitely be done, but the question is if that's what you want to prioritize right now. During a first draft, there will be a lot of things you'll want to go back and fix. The problem is, go back for enough of them, and you'll stop making any progress at all. So my first suggestion would be: don't go back yet. ...


29

Depending on the forum you post your fanfiction you will get those comments no matter what you do. It's a sad fact, but there are many people out there who just want to make others feel miserable and growing a thick skin when posting on the internet is a skill that you might need. Other than that it depends on the specifics of your fanfiction. For example ...


27

The main obstacle to fanfics flooding the market is copyright. As long as the original author holds the copyright for their work, fanfics can only live as free stuff on the internet. (Or, as Kirk points out, they can be "reskinned", "retooled", so they're not obviously recognisable as fanfic. In which case, it all depends on how good your lawyers are ...


20

No matter how good your fanfiction is, no matter how good your fiction is, no matter how good anything you do is, there will be trolls using vile language to put you down. There's not much you can do about them except ignore them. That said, the question of what things to avoid like the plague when writing fanfic is a valid one. The Mary Sue is, I believe ...


20

Why wouldn't it be possible? Yes. Fifty Shades et al are Twilight fanfics. Note that you may have to reskin a work (change characters, names, settings, etc) to get far enough away from the original work. Let's try this again: Is Sherlock Holmes on the BBC fanfic? Yup.


13

I say, ignore it. Sort of. I think you're right that the primary characteristics aren't the problem but it's all in how you flesh the race out. If your goal is humanoid aliens with human levels of communication skills and intelligence and a culture that is mutually intelligible (aliens you'd bump into in Star Trek or Supergirl or any of a thousand other ...


12

Short answer is No, it's never too late. The question is: how much will it cost in terms of time and effort? Given the fact that, as you say, this is your "first piece" and you write it to improve your writing, I would give you two suggestions: 1) you can start from scratch, and go back 97 pages and start from 0. It is a big effort, but it is a great ...


12

Negative comments that are not backed by actual criticism of your story are just trolling and should be ignored. I know it's hard, but try to focus on the positive comments you're probably also getting. If you're still worried about the quality of your story, see if you can get a beta reader (possibly from the same fanfiction community) to catch the worst ...


11

If they're on the Internet, someone has a copy of them. They are free now, and you will never have full control of them again. I won't swear to it, but I think when EL James got her book contract for the Fifty Shades trilogy, she deleted all the posted versions of those stories (which were after all Twilight fanfic). I seem to recall that older versions ...


10

First of all, let's be clear: "aggressive and angry" is not "emotionless." He's either one or the other. Second, "a bad man redeemed by the love of a good woman" can fall very easily into cliché. Try to stay away from the broad strokes of that. If you want someone who's aggressive and angry to calm down and be concerned about others, you must get to the ...


9

If your work is visible to the public, you cannot prevent plagiarism. You could reduce the likelihood of plagiarism by posting your work on a site that is protected by a password (and perhaps a user agreement). But this also reduces availability. You can perhaps increase your chances of detecting plagiarism by setting up a Google alert for one or more ...


9

In order to write well received fan-fiction it is important to determine the original author's policy on fan fiction. If the original author is against it, your individual story may not be well received by fans of the original no matter how well it is written. For example, some authors are explicitly against fan fiction based on their works. An example of ...


9

Drip-feed; only mention where you're differing from convention where it matters, when it matters. Sorry I don't do direct fan-fiction not in my writing nor my reading but let me try and elaborate without specific examples of fan-fiction. Terry Pratchett's Capre Jugulum comes to mind, the line "everyone who knows anything about ... knows" gets used on a ...


8

Fan fiction is a legal gray area, but in general these days, most shows will ignore it UNLESS you are trying to make money from it in some way --in which case they will definitely come after you (lawyers always follow the money!). That means publication as an actual novel is out. It's also 100% sure you would be denied permission if you did ask, not ...


8

Sophisticated/upper class English is not the same as antiquated or Elizabethan English. You're doing the latter, not the former. Honestly, the key to a sophisticated person is their lack of 'lower-class' colloquialisms; not necessarily a large amount of 'complex' words, but all of their words should be at the very least fit in as either formal or upper-...


8

@MatthewDave is quite right in saying that a sophisticated person's language would be distinguished by lack of 'lower-class' colloquialisms. Add to that impeccable grammar, and a rich vocabulary. By rich vocabulary I do not mean random use of fancy words. Instead, I mean words with a narrower meaning, that fit the given situation with greater precision. For ...


8

For a while, Amazon ran a program called Kindle Worlds where writers could write "fanfic" within the world of subscribed authors (Hugh Howey's Wool series, for example) within certain original author-established parameters. I wrote and published a story in that system, and it sold better than I expected (several hundred copies, maybe), and I had, over the ...


8

If you really want to make sure that your AU has become (or can become) original and fully independent, this is what I suggest: [Note: I'm trying to make this advice work for any type of story, not just yours, so I will mention things that make no sense in reference to RWBY.] 1. Break both stories into categories a. theme and purpose (what is it about? ...


8

No. Since Harry Potter has not been around nearly long enough to be public domain, and copyright law is a thing. But also Yes. IF you get permission from the person who owns the original content to write a spinoff (In this case I'm assuming J.K Rowling)... Good luck with that.


7

In some ways you're in luck if you want to write fan fiction in the Star Wars or Star Trek universes --because the copyright holders actually solicit authors to write in those universes. Some well-known authors have made good livings writing officially licensed books in those universes. Of course, the bar is probably pretty high to actually write a ...


7

This is a question about dialogue and effective dialogue, can and should do more than just feature a conversation between two people (or the self - inner dialogue). It should add depth and personality, animate your characters, move the story forward, and feel as real as an actual conversation (even though you shouldn't write it that way.) I feel it's always ...


7

Do not post online as you write it; even most professional writers do not like their first drafts, and IMO a beginner should never like their first draft, so you are just inviting criticism of something you would never actually try to call a finished product. I hope that is the case. Next, review the other fan fiction in your same fictional universe, and ...


6

Of course you would need the permission of the creators. A fanfiction is always based on something existing and you are not allowed to earn money with it. Only if the creators allow that. And allow me to say that: With 13 most of my stories were underdeveloped and hadn't shown any sign of something, that could suck the readers in and hold them. As hard ...


6

There are dozens of books out there on crafting dialogue, read as many as you can. Read Stephen King's On Writing. He has a short section on dialogue but the rest of the book is great too. The Writers Digest recommends Write Great Fiction - Dialogue by Gloria Kempton and I generally find WD's recommendations to be of a high standard. The secret to good ...


6

First, Ash's "drip-feed" is good advice. We are trying to avoid info-dumping, not information in general. As for technique, my personal favorite is through the thoughts and memories of the POV character. This can take some engineering on the part of the author to produce scenes that force the information out. Mark shook his head. "I won't do ...


6

First off, copyright is not an issue. Or at least, it is an easily avoidable issue. Copyright does not protect general ideas, like "what this alien race is like". It protects the specific words used to describe those ideas. If you copied ten pages out of a Star Trek script word for word, that would be copyright violation. If you liked the general idea of a ...


6

I don't think it is too long, I write chapters nearly that long. Some readers (even my own) complain that they use chapters to gauge their progress through the story and as stopping points, and very long chapters mess them up on that. You don't have to break yours up, but in response to that I have broken a chapter somewhere in the 40% to 60% area, by ...


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