19

One possibility is to not use the adjective: "Select a printer". Another is to use the adjective appropriate to the action: Sometimes you mean "Select a disk", sometimes (like for formatting) you mean "Select the target disk", sometimes (for installing an OS) "Select the desired boot disk", etc. I wouldn't look for just one word. "Preferred" is sometimes ...


10

All instructions writers wrestle with these terms. Just remember that instructions should be absolutely clear, without ambiguity. "Preferred" can be ambiguous. Does a "preferred" printer stay that way? Are you referring to a "preferred" printer, or just a printer to use now? Select the printer to use (for whatever you are doing). Avoid "desired" and ...


5

The guiding principle in my experience is: put the link where the reader needs the referenced information. Examples: "This interface is like Somebody Else's Thing (link, or make SET a link itself), and in addition..." -- put the link right there, because somebody unfamiliar with SET will need to at least skim the linked text to understand what you're about ...


4

I like Monica's answer -- my answer here is about how to be sure these links are still viable in the future. If others are also making the documents, I encourage "casual citation", so there's not the stress of Proper Bibliographic Formatting, but as long as the URL is there, then readers can get to where the writer went. To be sure that it's still there ...


4

Your first suggestion looks fine. It doesn't seem likely to be misconstrued. There are other similar sentences that would convey the same information in slightly different words, such as: This tag is assigned if FieldName is Value This tag is assigned when field FieldName is Value This tag is assigned if field: FieldName is Value This tag is assigned if ...


3

I would argue against the use of "is" to describe the relationship. There are too many usages of "is" to allow it to be interpreted with the precision that technical writing must have. This is overly fussy, but after decades of trying to communicate technical details to non-technical audiences, I feel totally justified. For an exact match,...


3

This depends largely on the way existing documentation is written. Normally you have some kind of template that you can use for most documents. This template should illustrate how to cite external references. In case it does not show you how to do it you should have a look at other documents or for example ask colleagues who have been in the company for ...


1

For some values, there's a defined length or maximum length. Like US Zip Codes are 5 digits, or 10 digits if you allow for zip-plus-4 and they hyphen. Credit card numbers are typically 16 digits. Etc. Of course many values aren't controlled by some central authority and don't have defined lengths. A person's name would be an obvious example. In these cases, ...


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