16

I think the biggest thing to remember is that you are not your character. You are writing a story, but not actually going through this yourself. I know this is difficult, but if I felt everything my protagonist is going through, I'd go insane. The theme of my story is "identity." The protagonist dies right before the beginning of the story and another soul (...


13

Write the ending. Do it now. You can revise it later, or scrap it and write it over, but get your tears out of the way. I think you dread writing the outcome; face that dread and write it. Make it a done deal in your life, you won't dread it as much while writing. I am a discovery writer; I often don't know who will live and die even amongst secondary ...


12

The short version: To write at length turn off your inner editor. The long version: Why the problem writing long form? Writing at length is a completely different kettle of fish from writing shorts. I am absolutely hopeless in short form. However to become adept at either type of writing takes commitment and effort. I always had the point of view that a ...


8

I'm the same really. I'm scared of sci-fi books, really scared of them, because they always depict a horrible dark future which isn't the kind of future I want. But that's not the point of the question. Question 1 Should I quit trying or try hard no matter what? You mustn't give up. I'm only a few years older than you, but I've written every day for at ...


8

It seems like the most pressing problem is that fear of the death is preventing you from writing the character's life. So my advice is to write "in the moment." Let go of that fated conclusion you've set for the character and just write his life. Be open to the possibility that maybe things won't end the way you originally thought. Fear of death is ...


7

Most importantly make sure you are writing something you really care about (as long as we're not talking about your day-to-day job here). No hobby is made better by forcing yourself to do only what you think others will appreciate rather than what you truly love to create. As for getting bored in the creative process, and this is just a personal annecdote, ...


6

One way is to allow yourself to write a crappy first draft and then fix it in editing. A lot of authors go that way. They just keep writing, not looking too much at what they've written in previous chapters. Their editing work then turns into gold digging where you grab a bunch of muck and rinse away a lot to find the golden nuggets that gets to be ...


6

While other answerers have encouraged you to push through this, and that may be the right call, I thought I'd offer another suggestion. Put it down for a while. Take a breather and do something else, something fun. Maybe write a fanfic-style short story about the same characters, but what if they met when they were kids? You may be surprised how much ...


6

This is not so much a writing question as a question about how to do things that are tough. If this is something you have to do because it is the right thing, then you need to figure out why it's the right thing for you to do and commit yourself to that path. Why do you need to tell this story? Why do you need to kill this character? If it's to show how ...


5

A good way to assess yourself from a new point of view is to: Read your work out loud. Your ear catches things your eye misses, both on the level of content and form. Some things your ears will notice better than your eyes: unwanted repetition of words and phrases word choice how well you've achieved a desired tone rhythm emotional range how real/...


5

If you are a discovery writer, this is part of your process. Just get it all on the page and keep writing; you'll finish when you finish. However, it is then part of the first draft that you must go back and sort it out from beginning to end and make sure it's a coherent whole. Writing "the good parts" is fun and keeps you motivated. As long as you accept ...


5

I get the struggles, believe me. I'm only a few years older than you, but I started writing when was a few years younger. I write sci-fi as well and depending on how out there the story is, it can be difficult. The best advice I can give to you is to experiment. If sci-fi isn't your cup of tea, then figure out what is. Incorporate that into your sci-fi piece....


5

Remember that your creative time is valuable and rare. If you're having trouble thinking of something, there may be a deeper flaw which you only realized after starting. Sure it's possible to write yourself out of a flawed story premise. I've done it several times with amazing success. But you have to prioritize your projects and make sure you're not ...


5

I used to do the same thing when I was first starting out. My sense is that it's because you are excited and inspired by The Thing, and you want more of The Thing, so you make more of it by mimicking it. I'm going to come at a solution for you from an odd angle, so hear me out before you dismiss my answer. My suggestion is that for right now, give in to ...


5

Maybe you're focusing too much on what you like, rather than what you like about it. Once you know what you like about something, it's usually not too difficult to come up with something that has those qualities, but in a different way. The deeper you go in your understanding of what you like, the further you can go in your own creations (because the core of ...


4

You have to look at it in a different way, different perspective, different mindset or different time frame. Go away and do something different, come back and look at it again. Anything you write will generally need to go through a number of revision, editing and proof reading stages to correct and sharpen the writing. Whether you apply these as actual ...


4

I used to have this problem. Here are some tips that helped me in no particular order: 1. Expect your first draft to be broken and be okay with that. I would get somewhere around chapter 6, think: "oh, I should have had this other thing happen in chapter 3". I would then go back and rewrite chapter 3 and think: "oh, but I need this in chapter 2 for this ...


4

The comments on your post suggest therapy, and I think it is good advice. This is more than just writer's block or procrastination. It sounds like you have serious anxiety that's triggered by writing. Here are some things you might try if you can't afford a therapist. First, pick a book and copy the text out of it. This will help you get used to the ...


4

Obviously there's no one answer to this. These are simply my observations on dealing with this issue: I've found writing in LaTeX to be quite liberating; by planning the rough shape of the story (sections or chapters) I can then create a separate module that will contain each chapter or section. Each module contains a comment at the top with the rough ...


4

I often think of what Ira Glass says in this video about the gap between your work and the work that you admire. Here's the quote in text: Nobody tells this to people who are beginners. I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make ...


4

You found a time when you can write. Why on earth would you want to break that habit? Fix your grammatical errors in the morning. Get your ideas on paper when the Muse wants you.


4

Here's a slightly different approach. Write the story in such a way the MC's death has something to compensate it, such as your character becoming irredeemable by dint of their actions of personality, or them dying to save someone else, or his death leading to a noble cause or vengeance against the killer. Now, it's not normally a good idea to tell you what ...


4

Even if there's nothing uplifting or redeeming, the protagonist's death will have a positive interpretation - you've thought enough about his life to tell that story. It's not death itself that's a problem - it's the idea of a meaningless death, and if your story has brought home the futility of war your character has not died in vain. I've seen boys raised ...


4

Figure out how the negativity will bounce back. Your main character dies. Does someone else benefit? Was the main character partnering with someone, and the torch is handed to the partner who went on to do great things? Was the main character's plight written down in an article of a small newspaper, but then some person stumbles across the story and is ...


4

My only problem is when I find the need for research something in the internet for my writing. I'll say what works for me. I use Focus Writer I turn off not only my computer's wi-fi, but my router as well When I feel the shallow need of searching for something, I write down what exactly I want to know and leave it there. So when I really feel the need for ...


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