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Answering the question is like answering how you ride a bicycle: You simply "know" how to do it. And if you can't do... then like with a bicycle you try. In the case of writing characters, each character has some story to tell, internal motivations, internal feelings. This is the case for virtually any character, in any video game, short story, ...


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You’re human. Just use your real life experience to situations as a reference. In other words, use punctuation to highlight emotion. Punctuation may just be a conglomerate of symbols, but they exist to highlight a phenomenon we as humans undergo in real life. “Hey!” Is different from “hey…”, is it not? So this is one tip: use punctuation to your advantage. ...


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Make the Scene Work Harder, or Cut it You can absolutely introduce a character for one scene. The real question is whether the scene is worthwhile as it is. You describe the scene as if all it does is world-building. I would either expand it or cut it. Scenes need to do multiple things at once. The most important thing I scene needs to do is provide a source ...


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As they say in show biz: There are no small parts, only small actors. Take this person and make their one line memorable. Think of it as a cameo by a famous actor past his or her prime.


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EDL's answer is great. One thing I would add, which my editor always enforces, is: read it out loud. As EDL and Matthew said, it's heightened conversation, not what you'd necessarily transcribe from a recording. Still, if you can't even imagine someone saying it, then take it out. This will eliminate those long sentences with lots of subordinate clauses that ...


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