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2

My older sister is a bipolar adult - around 35 years old. She's aware of it, she's been medicated for it, and frankly, I think she manages it very well 99% of the time. While it's true that she has triggers, I think it's probably more relevant to your writing to be aware of how certain situations could be defused or snowball into a complete disaster, so I'm ...


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These are your options. Use ellipsis to indicate a pause Explicitly describe the act of pausing. Fill the gap with a digression about what else is happening at the time, or the surroundings, or the characters' thoughts etc. Omit the pause. I adopt option 4) by default, varying from that only where it is essential to do so. A dialogue in real life might ...


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You could also use normal text set off by "guillemets", which are symbols used in some other languages instead of quotation marks. See the Wikipedia article 'Guillemet'. There are several styles, e.g. with or without extra spaces, with the guillemets pointing inwards » « instead of outwards, « » etc. It would look like: "Hi Dave." « Good ...


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If You can't Puzzle them with Pauses, Stun them with Scenery: In the cases where there is an awkward gap in a conversation, you need something to fill in the gap. There is never NOTHING going on. So talk about what IS going on. In an awkward silence, the emptiness is filled by the wind that can now be heard blowing through the trees. Or perhaps a mob of ...


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The third one reads the most natural to me -- except I would move "I spied..." to a new line, because "I" isn't who is speaking in the previous sentence. As I understand it (I'm still learning this myself, though), there are two things to consider: focus, and chronology. Chronology What happened first? Or rather, what did your POV ...


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Timeline overlap. A scene can be wrote numerous times from different perspectives giving rise to different voices. So a banquette with event x at the end, could have six or seven repeated timelines with different points of view up to the event x. A good example of this was Milan Kundera's 'Unbearable Lightness of Being'. IIR he even had one section where he ...


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Center the Action on the Purpose of the Scene Every scene should have conflict, and every important scene should have character growth. Those things are the reason you write the scene, and why you keep it, when you get to editing. Find the character who has the most (or most important) conflict and/or growth, and stick close to them. Example If you have a ...


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I suggest you always start a new paragraph when you change: speaker; place; time; topic; or character. Consider if the person doing the action is also responsible for the action. If they say it and do it, shouldn't it be in the same paragraph, unless there is a time gap? If the person who says it doesn't do the action, shouldn't it be a separate paragraph? ...


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The way I see it, you'd have to structure this rather rigorously. Perhaps organize their conversation into chunks, maybe even separate chapters? For example, focus on the interactions between 3 of the characters first. Occasionally 2 other characters chip in but only for a few lines, just to remind the readers that other characters are, indeed, present. And ...


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Short answer, is you don't include everyone's dialogue. While it's tempting to have every character have their moment of pride where they get to talk, it's far more common that they react instead. One of them gasps, another places her hand on her heart. Another faints, one of drops their mouth... The Malazan Book of the Fallen might be something to read to ...


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