21

It's not that it's always a bad thing - and to directly answer your question it can be appropriate to use it. Where it's bad is when it is over-used, specifically when the writer relies on it to place the emphasis they "hear" on the words but without actually conveying the particulars of that emphasis to the reader. Imagine you're trying to show a ...


10

Item #1: Words are just tools First, writing is ultimately about conveying something. If your words convey to the reader what you want them to, they're good by definition. It's just a question of: is there a better way to get your message across? If not... then keep it how you have it! Item #2: You're relying on a (possibly inaccurate) proxy. You're ...


6

I would recommend having A paraphrase C and D's dialogue instead of repeating it word-for-word. That way, you don't have to worry about nested quote marks, and you can summarise C and D's exchanges instead of having lengthy conversations inside lengthy conversations, which will get confusing and tiring. Your readers (and B) shouldn't need to know every ...


6

While its certainly easy to overuse both italization and bolding, if you take extra care to use it quite sparingly and certainly NOT multiple times with a sentence it can be ok. Oh, right that also applies to all caps which is bad vs While its certainly easy to overuse both italization and bolding, if you take extra care to use it quite sparingly and ...


4

I would say for me, my style would be a hard no, but I use italicized letters to denote a shift in my two narrators. Italicized letters are the thoughts of the main character while reflecting on events that they would be aware of at that moment. For me, I do capitilizations of non-proper nouns I wish emphasize, and even then I try not to do it in dialog. ...


4

I think this is perfectly fine, just so long as you aren't abusing it. I myself don't do this much anymore, but that's less because of me thinking it's bad and more because of me writing on a platform that doesn't support italics. There are also plenty of published books out there that use italics for emphasis, although I can't remember them at the moment. I ...


4

In short: yes, the phrase "just as well" can be used sarcastically; most anything can, under the right circumstances. At length: In this case, the usage would probably depend more on the precise tone the character is expressing. If they're particularly irate about it, they might use a stronger word like "lovely" or "wonderful" ...


3

You've chosen to limit your readers to a single sense during their journey through your story. Limiting them to the words spoken will limit how deeply they can enter your world. How much they are limited will vary from reader to reader, with highly visual or tactile centric readers suffering the most. Deliberately limiting your audience to those who can ...


2

The Narrator is the Third Person Perspective: I would simply write these parts in third person from the perspective of the narrator as the third person. So the limited omniscience is limited by what the narrator knows. Since C and D conversations don't actually include A and B, A and B don't contaminate the story. You don't discuss A and B in the narration. ...


2

I can tell you exactly how to fix the problem and what mindset you're not in just by your examples you gave: You describe the story perfectly... you show the rising action (the fight), the climax (meeting the old flame), and the conclusion (reconciliation with her spouse). You got a good "Who" "What" and "Why" succinctly ...


2

I'm always a huge proponent of 'less is more'. For example: "As she took in the improvements that time had made on his face, she wondered just how much those new lines were rooted in the countless laughs they had shared." is more engaging and evocative than them rehashing their history verbally. Doing, not saying. It is an action. In this case, ...


2

There is nothing wrong per-se in using italics for emphasis, though relying on it is thin ice. Here's a suggestion: Use whatever you like in your draft, then when editing take it as a prompt to try to paint the picture of the conversation in more detail so the reader is in the same mindset as you. Draft: "I will never let you..." Edit: John ...


2

I find italics to be quite helpful in both emphases on words in dialogue, and internal dialogue. I second the others that you just need to be aware of how much you're using it - don't want it to lose meaning, right? Same goes for internal dialogue. Like, if you have a paragraph of thought, and it's all in italics, that's hard to read sometimes. Overall, ...


2

As others have said, italics in moderation are fine. If they're your only tool for emphasis, yes, they can lose some impact. One other option is moving the dialogue tag: "We," she said, "see a clear difference between the two groups. But other people won't."


1

I tend to use ellipses ("...") and dashes (-) depending on the nature of interuption. The former is for a pregnant pause when the character has a verbal dialog with him/herself over a problem, i.e.: "5 times 3 is 15. Carry the 1... divid by 2... account for change in gravity..." While a dash will be used for dialog that would start ...


1

If you have seen any movie of Tarantino you will know dialogue is quite important. Sometimes you can even have two characters just discussing of a random topic. And even if is nothing important at a first view, it can still add to the story because it let us see how the characters are in their "natural habitat". After all, is not like people lives ...


1

Stories that hinge on emotional relationships are often inclined to an excess of dialogue, but these verbal conflicts between characters are only going to feel tense and meaningful if you also give them some alone time. After your characters have shouted themselves hoarse or reminisced aloud, leave them the space to process it in quiet. The introspection ...


1

In cases I have seen, it goes a bit like this; "And after I punched him he said, 'you hit like a girl!' and then knocked me down and kept kicking me. " You have your character speaking, and then the quote is in single quotes rather than double. Quotes in quotes in quotes though, I'm not entirely sure, but I guess it's also single quotes.


1

I would suggest a mixture of paraphrasing and quoting. That will reduce monotonicity and keep the audience more engaged. Extending @F1Krazy's example: "C suggested that the pair should use the Lorem Ipsum Maneuver," A continued. "D disagreed by saying and I quote, Lorem Ipsum Maneuver was highly dangerous, and that the last pilots to try it ...


1

I find italics to be easier to understand as the reader. It makes it less complicated and can be caught by the eye pretty rapidly and the reader will learn to recognize the person's dialogue by the italics. It's just overall a lot simpler.


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